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Old 05-14-2008, 04:46 PM
David Armour
 
Default Virtual disk recovery

Good morning!
> On Tue, May 13, 2008 at 06:23:16PM -0700, Steven Davies-Morris wrote:
>
>> I've been reading through the documentation but can't seem to find
>> anything in there that lets me tell it grow a VDI from 8gb to 16gb to
> <snip>
>
> I've only just started using/trying VirtualBox but I'm pretty sure it
> told me as I was installing it that it grows the virtual disk as
> required, you don't have to tell it.
>
>
Before upgrading to Hardy a couple of weeks back, I was using both
Virtualbox and VMWare (server) to take a look at various distributions
(LinuxMint, DreamLinux, Hardy-beta, etc.)

Since the up-grade, however, only VirtualBox shows up on the
Applications/System Tools listing, and I initially read that Hardy was
missing a couple of components [paraphrasing] that VMWare needed. Since
then, I've found one way to (re-)install VMWare on Hardy:

[http://ubuntu-tutorials.com/2008/05/03/install-vmware-server-105-on-ubuntu-804-hardy/]

But because I definitely no longer need the space for the Hardy-beta
trial, I still want that hard-drive space back! And since each virtual
install typically allocates a default 8Gb, the potentially recoverable
hard drive real estate remains non-trivial. A related issue involves
recovery of allocated space for which I can no longer remember the
passwords!

Googling variations of 'reclaim partition space vmware server ubuntu
hardy' has come up mostly dry. Using a partition editor, e.g. GParted,
makes my trepidation meter go crazy. And merely deleting .vmdk files
*doesn't* seem to add space to the available remaining 82 of the 160Gb.

As always, any recommendations greatly appreciated.

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Old 05-14-2008, 05:19 PM
Bart Silverstrim
 
Default Virtual disk recovery

David Armour wrote:

> Before upgrading to Hardy a couple of weeks back, I was using both
> Virtualbox and VMWare (server) to take a look at various distributions
> (LinuxMint, DreamLinux, Hardy-beta, etc.)
>
> Since the up-grade, however, only VirtualBox shows up on the
> Applications/System Tools listing, and I initially read that Hardy was
> missing a couple of components [paraphrasing] that VMWare needed. Since
> then, I've found one way to (re-)install VMWare on Hardy:
>
> [http://ubuntu-tutorials.com/2008/05/03/install-vmware-server-105-on-ubuntu-804-hardy/]
>
> But because I definitely no longer need the space for the Hardy-beta
> trial, I still want that hard-drive space back! And since each virtual
> install typically allocates a default 8Gb, the potentially recoverable
> hard drive real estate remains non-trivial. A related issue involves
> recovery of allocated space for which I can no longer remember the
> passwords!
>
> Googling variations of 'reclaim partition space vmware server ubuntu
> hardy' has come up mostly dry. Using a partition editor, e.g. GParted,
> makes my trepidation meter go crazy. And merely deleting .vmdk files
> *doesn't* seem to add space to the available remaining 82 of the 160Gb.
>
> As always, any recommendations greatly appreciated.

A) I've been downloading and installing the latest beta of VMWare server
from Vmware. It uninstalls the old Vmware and the betas have been
working for me on my Hardy install, but be aware that it is very
different in interface from the previous versions...this one is web-based.

B) If you want the space back, just delete the folder in which you had
the virtual machine and you'll reclaim your hard drive space. The
default install area was something like /var/lib/vmware/Virtual
Machines, under that were individual directories for each VM.

-Bart

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Old 05-14-2008, 09:00 PM
David Armour
 
Default Virtual disk recovery

>> Before upgrading to Hardy a couple of weeks back, I was using both
>> Virtualbox and VMWare (server) to take a look at various
>> distributions (LinuxMint, DreamLinux, Hardy-beta, etc.)
>>
>> Since the up-grade, however, only VirtualBox shows up on the
>> Applications/System Tools listing, and I initially read that Hardy
>> was missing a couple of components [paraphrasing] that VMWare needed.
>> Since then, I've found one way to (re-)install VMWare on Hardy:
>> [http://ubuntu-tutorials.com/2008/05/03/install-vmware-server-105-on-ubuntu-804-hardy/]
>>
>>
>> But because I definitely no longer need the space for the Hardy-beta
>> trial, I still want that hard-drive space back! <snip>
>
> A) I've been downloading and installing the latest beta of VMWare
> server from Vmware. It uninstalls the old Vmware and the betas have
> been working for me on my Hardy install, but be aware that it is very
> different in interface from the previous versions...this one is
> web-based.
>
> B) If you want the space back, just delete the folder in which you had
> the virtual machine and you'll reclaim your hard drive space. The
> default install area was something like /var/lib/vmware/Virtual
> Machines, under that were individual directories for each VM.

Thank the relelvant deity-like entity for your reply! Both for the
reassurance of A), and for memory-jogging of B). I was sure I'd seen
something along B)'s lines in the backwash of my ordinary daily surfing,
but I'd encountered the info when I still couldn't locate the folder, so
the advice was mute, as they say in Langford.

Thanks v. much for your message!


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