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Old 09-08-2012, 04:52 AM
Doug
 
Default new video card problems

On 09/08/2012 12:34 AM, Ric Moore wrote:

On 09/07/2012 02:06 PM, Bill Stanley wrote:

On 09/07/2012 11:36 AM, Basil Chupin wrote:

< snip >


You'll find the driver(s) here:

http://www.geforce.com/drivers

but with Ubuntu you need to go thru hoops in order to get a driver from
nVidia to work.

Why? Because to compile it yourself you need to have a few files
installed which are not easy to do in Ubuntu because Ubuntu doesn't
like

you messing around and doing things for yourself. So, stick with the
driver you find in the Additional Drivers menu you see in Ubuntu. It is
the one shown there as 'recommended, or some such, and you are asked if
you want to Activate it. Activate it and the default nouveau driver
will

be replaced.

However, if you really and truly want to compile your own and be
up-to-date then look here:

http://www.google.com/cse?cx=004599128559784038176%3Avj_p0xo-nng&ie=UTF-8&q=compiling+nvidia+driver&sa=Search#gsc.tab=0&gs c.q=compiling%20nvidia%20driver&gsc.page=1





BC



I tried "Additional drivers" and I got some nonsense. It said...

*****
Downloading package indexes failed, please check your network status.
Most drivers will not be available.
*****

The nonsense is that my network is running just fine! What's that all
about? By the way, it proceeded to do a search (presumably of the
network) and found nothing. It looks like I might have to install those
drivers manually. Before I try to do so, is there anything else I can
try? It's funny that Doug said he had the same video card and it worked
just fine. Was Doug's video card in his computer at install time? Maybe
the difference is that I am trying to install new video card drivers.


Maybe it's in a jam since you have an old /etc/X11/xorg.conf file? You
might try renaming it to xorg.conf.orig and then reboot. Without an
xorg.conf file, it should go into rescue mode, since there is no other
video setup or wrong nvidia driver running and from there jockey might
actually do it's job. It has pretty much always worked for me. Others
will have similar ideas so before you pull the plug, see what comes up
before the end of the weekend. Ric




I had mentioned before that I have the card and it works. I remember
that I had to set the BIOS so that the memory could be used. I don't
remember just what I did, and I
don't know if this has any effect on what your problem is, but check out
the BIOS and see if there's anything there that you might need to
modify. --doug


--
Blessed are the peacekeepers...for they shall be shot at from both sides. --A.M. Greeley


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Old 09-08-2012, 07:48 AM
Ric Moore
 
Default new video card problems

On 09/08/2012 12:52 AM, Doug wrote:

On 09/08/2012 12:34 AM, Ric Moore wrote:

On 09/07/2012 02:06 PM, Bill Stanley wrote:

On 09/07/2012 11:36 AM, Basil Chupin wrote:

< snip >


You'll find the driver(s) here:

http://www.geforce.com/drivers

but with Ubuntu you need to go thru hoops in order to get a driver from
nVidia to work.

Why? Because to compile it yourself you need to have a few files
installed which are not easy to do in Ubuntu because Ubuntu doesn't
like
you messing around and doing things for yourself. So, stick with the
driver you find in the Additional Drivers menu you see in Ubuntu. It is
the one shown there as 'recommended, or some such, and you are asked if
you want to Activate it. Activate it and the default nouveau driver
will
be replaced.

However, if you really and truly want to compile your own and be
up-to-date then look here:

http://www.google.com/cse?cx=004599128559784038176%3Avj_p0xo-nng&ie=UTF-8&q=compiling+nvidia+driver&sa=Search#gsc.tab=0&gs c.q=compiling%20nvidia%20driver&gsc.page=1




BC



I tried "Additional drivers" and I got some nonsense. It said...

*****
Downloading package indexes failed, please check your network status.
Most drivers will not be available.
*****

The nonsense is that my network is running just fine! What's that all
about? By the way, it proceeded to do a search (presumably of the
network) and found nothing. It looks like I might have to install those
drivers manually. Before I try to do so, is there anything else I can
try? It's funny that Doug said he had the same video card and it worked
just fine. Was Doug's video card in his computer at install time? Maybe
the difference is that I am trying to install new video card drivers.


Maybe it's in a jam since you have an old /etc/X11/xorg.conf file? You
might try renaming it to xorg.conf.orig and then reboot. Without an
xorg.conf file, it should go into rescue mode, since there is no other
video setup or wrong nvidia driver running and from there jockey might
actually do it's job. It has pretty much always worked for me. Others
will have similar ideas so before you pull the plug, see what comes up
before the end of the weekend. Ric




I had mentioned before that I have the card and it works. I remember
that I had to set the BIOS so that the memory could be used. I don't
remember just what I did, and I
don't know if this has any effect on what your problem is, but check out
the BIOS and see if there's anything there that you might need to
modify. --doug


Oh yeah, if he has a built in video chipset that has to be disabled. The
bios might have gone wonky with a new card installed and restored the
factory setting. Good call, Doug. Ric




--
My father, Victor Moore (Vic) used to say:
"There are two Great Sins in the world...
..the Sin of Ignorance, and the Sin of Stupidity.
Only the former may be overcome." R.I.P. Dad.
http://linuxcounter.net/user/44256.html

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Old 09-08-2012, 03:18 PM
Basil Chupin
 
Default new video card problems

On 08/09/12 14:27, Ric Moore wrote:

On 09/07/2012 11:36 AM, Basil Chupin wrote:

On 08/09/12 00:32, Bill Stanley wrote:

On 09/06/2012 10:56 PM, Basil Chupin wrote:

On 07/09/12 11:38, Ric Moore wrote:


[ snip ]


On some systems, mine included, the gui won't work - even if you have
the default nouveau driver installed - unless you have the correct
nVidia driver for that card AND (especially) the version of the kernel
installed. Without the right driver you will get dumped into command
line mode. (In my case, I also always compile my own nVidia driver
downloaded from nVidia site - the latest driver being 304.37.)

When this happens, one way out is to boot into safe mode then go to
your
settings and install/compile the nVidia driver. Or do what you
suggested

above.

but this is a quick fix from the command line for anyone who needs
it,

when a GUI is completely unavailable.
-----------------------------
You'll want the highest number -l reports, I think... Ric
Your old /etc/X11/xorg.conf should work. Make sure it hasn't been
overwritten, as it should show within it: driver: nvidia. If not then
you should have an xorg.conf.orig or xorg.conf~ file. Check them for
having the driver correctly set and then copy the file that does to
xorg.conf. Reboot. You should be good to go. Ric


BC


Thanks for reminding me about recovery mode. I now have the GUI up
but running in low resolution failsafe mode. I tried to update the
drivers the "additional drivers" could not find the needed drivers
from Nvidia. How do I contact Nvidia, find and install the needed
video card drivers?

Bill Stanley


You'll find the driver(s) here:

http://www.geforce.com/drivers

but with Ubuntu you need to go thru hoops in order to get a driver from
nVidia to work.

Why? Because to compile it yourself you need to have a few files
installed which are not easy to do in Ubuntu because Ubuntu doesn't like
you messing around and doing things for yourself. So, stick with the
driver you find in the Additional Drivers menu you see in Ubuntu. It is
the one shown there as 'recommended, or some such, and you are asked if
you want to Activate it. Activate it and the default nouveau driver will
be replaced.

However, if you really and truly want to compile your own and be
up-to-date then look here:

http://www.google.com/cse?cx=004599128559784038176%3Avj_p0xo-nng&ie=UTF-8&q=compiling+nvidia+driver&sa=Search#gsc.tab=0&gs c.q=compiling%20nvidia%20driver&gsc.page=1



The problem being is that Ubuntu decides where library stuff should go
and nVidia has their own ideas. Not saying who's right or wrong, but
the lib files from each are in different locations. If you are going
to install the nVidia drivers directly from nVidia then you need to
remove all Ubuntu nvidia and nouvaou deb packages (and probably
OpenGL) first. They conflict with the run file you're about to
install. It gets a little weird, but that method does work. Ric


I have to go with what you say because of ignorance on my part but I can
add this which is that nVidia don't have a driver which is labeled "for
ubuntu" or "for openSUSE" or "for fedora", etc. It's a *.run file which
you execute (sh NVIDIA*.run) and it installs the driver.


BC

--
Using openSUSE 12.2 x86_64 KDE 4.9.1 & kernel 3.5.3-1 on a system with-
AMD FX 8-core 3.6/4.2GHz processor
16GB PC14900/1866MHz Quad Channel Corsair "Vengeance" RAM
Gigabyte AMD3+ m/board; Gigabyte nVidia GTX550Ti 1GB DDR5 GPU


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Old 09-08-2012, 08:48 PM
Bill Stanley
 
Default new video card problems

< snip >
> Oh yeah, if he has a built in video chipset that has to
> be disabled. The bios might have gone wonky with a new
> card installed and restored the factory setting.
> Good call, Doug. Ric

That is a possibility but I don't really know. The computer is a Dell
Studio XPS and it came from the factory with the Nvidia GeForce 420 (512
MB videa ram) installed. How can I determine if there is a built in
video chipset on the motherboard.


Also Here is another bit of information that I just discovered. Sorry
for not giving all the information needed to trouble shoot the
situation. (I at first thought that it was something very simple. Mea
Culpa!)


I tried upgrading to version 12.04, didn't line Unity or Gnome 3 and
tried XUbuntu. I really didn't like that either but it was tolerable.
Here is the catch, I never install the new version without keeping the
old version Ubuntu 10.10 - Gnome 2 on my computer. I keep /home on a
separate partition so in effect I can triple boot. I just ignore the
XUbuntu and use the old Gnome 2.



When I boot, the GRUB gives this information.

*************************************
Ubuntu using Linux 22.6.35-generic pae
Windows
Ubuntu using Linux 3.2.0.24-generic pae
*************************************
(There are other entries which are unimportant.)

I assume that the numbers refer to the Linux kernel version. Windows
and Linux version 3.2.0.24 are OK. I am not quite sure if the XUbuntu
(3.2.0.24) is OK because I rarely use it. Most of my Linux computing is
done with Gnome 2 and that is the version I am having problems with.
Maybe Canonical is refusing to allow the upgrade of the video card
forcing me to explicitly install the proper drivers or to do an upgrade?


Bill Stanley

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Old 09-09-2012, 12:54 PM
Liam Proven
 
Default new video card problems

On 8 September 2012 21:48, Bill Stanley <bstanle@wowway.com> wrote:
>
> That is a possibility but I don't really know. The computer is a Dell
> Studio XPS and it came from the factory with the Nvidia GeForce 420 (512 MB
> videa ram) installed. How can I determine if there is a built in video
> chipset on the motherboard.

Is there a monitor connection on the back of the motherboard?
>
> When I boot, the GRUB gives this information.
>
> *************************************
> Ubuntu using Linux 22.6.35-generic pae

Shouldn't this be 2.6.35?

> Windows
> Ubuntu using Linux 3.2.0.24-generic pae
> *************************************
> (There are other entries which are unimportant.)
>
> I assume that the numbers refer to the Linux kernel version.

Correct.

> Windows and
> Linux version 3.2.0.24 are OK. I am not quite sure if the XUbuntu
> (3.2.0.24) is OK because I rarely use it. Most of my Linux computing is
> done with Gnome 2 and that is the version I am having problems with.

What version of *Ubuntu* is this?

> Maybe Canonical is refusing to allow the upgrade of the video card forcing
> me to explicitly install the proper drivers or to do an upgrade?

I don't understand what you mean.

--
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MSN: lproven@hotmail.com • Skype/AIM/Yahoo/LinkedIn: liamproven
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Old 09-09-2012, 09:05 PM
Drac Noc
 
Default new video card problems

On 07/09/12 02:13, Doug wrote:
> On 09/06/2012 08:37 PM, Bill Stanley wrote:
>> I just upgraded my video card from a Nvidia 420 with 512 MB of video
>> ram to a new Nvidia GTX550Ti with 2 GB of video ram. I dual boot and
>> Widnows uses this card OK (this rules out hardware problems) but I
>> can't get the GUI running when I boot to Linux. I am dumped into the
>> command line and since I am not as proficient with the command line,
>> I do not know what commands I have to use to get the new video card
>> to run. Of course, without the GUI, I also can't visit the usual
>> help sites.
>>
>> Since they are both Nvidia cards, I didn't expect much problems and
>> hopefully it isn't much of an issue. Could it be the 2GB of video RAM?
>> Please let me know what CLI commands will get the GUI up and running.
>>
> I can't answer your question, but I can tell you that this exact card
> is running fine under PCLinuxOs 2012, KDE, with one exception: the
> HDMI sound output doesn't work. (It works under XP, in the
> same machine. At the same time, when in XP, there is no sound
> locally. ) I have a graphical (GUI) setup in my KDE menu. I bought
> the card since my on-board mobo video detector could not play
> movies. This card plays movies perfectly. I have to run the movies on
> XP, if I want to watch them and listen to them on my TV. (They run
> fine with local sound and video on Linux.)
> I am thoroughly convinced that the HDMI sound problem is all software,
> but NVidia doesn't care much about Linux, and they don't seem to care
> that much about XP either, since in XP
> sound ONLY comes out of the TV--ever. Unless you disconnect the HDMI
> cable.
>
> For reference, my mobo is a Foxconn G41MXE.
>
> Somebody from the Ubuntu world should be able to get your GUI setup
> going. Good luck.
>
> --doug
>
>
Same problem here with the HDMI audio output on GT210. Here's what I found:

http://www.piggott.me.uk/blog/2011/03/26/how-to-make-pulseaudio-work-with-nvidia-hdmi-audio-outputs-under-fedora-and-ubuntu/

Worked like a charm.

Drac.

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Old 09-10-2012, 07:43 AM
Ric Moore
 
Default new video card problems

On 09/08/2012 04:48 PM, Bill Stanley wrote:

< snip >
> Oh yeah, if he has a built in video chipset that has to
> be disabled. The bios might have gone wonky with a new
> card installed and restored the factory setting.
> Good call, Doug. Ric

That is a possibility but I don't really know. The computer is a Dell
Studio XPS and it came from the factory with the Nvidia GeForce 420 (512
MB videa ram) installed. How can I determine if there is a built in
video chipset on the motherboard.


The motherboard will have video connections on it. But, you might have
to go into your bios to make sure that your video card and it's slot is
correctly set up. Ric





--
My father, Victor Moore (Vic) used to say:
"There are two Great Sins in the world...
..the Sin of Ignorance, and the Sin of Stupidity.
Only the former may be overcome." R.I.P. Dad.
http://linuxcounter.net/user/44256.html

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Old 09-11-2012, 02:55 PM
Bill Stanley
 
Default new video card problems

< snip >

There isn't a video connector on the back of the motherboard so I assume
that there is not a video chipset on the motherboard.


>> When I boot, the GRUB gives this information.
>>
>> *************************************
>> Ubuntu using Linux 22.6.35-generic pae
>
> Shouldn't this be 2.6.35?
>
>> Windows
>> Ubuntu using Linux 3.2.0.24-generic pae
>> *************************************
>> (There are other entries which are unimportant.)
>>
>> I assume that the numbers refer to the Linux kernel version.
>
> Correct.
>
>> Windows and
>> Linux version 3.2.0.24 are OK. I am not quite sure if the XUbuntu
>> (3.2.0.24) is OK because I rarely use it. Most of my Linux computing is
>> done with Gnome 2 and that is the version I am having problems with.
>
> What version of *Ubuntu* is this?

It is version 10.04. I am keeping it around for legacy reasons.

>> Maybe Canonical is refusing to allow the upgrade of the video card
forcing

>> me to explicitly install the proper drivers or to do an upgrade?
>
> I don't understand what you mean.
>


This really was not meant to be a question. (It was more like thinking
out loud. With the Unity problems, I am starting to lose faith in
Canonical.)


Bill Stanley

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