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Old 08-17-2012, 06:42 PM
Liam Proven
 
Default Problems with repartitioning a HP Pavilion Laptop

On 17 August 2012 19:03, Bill Stanley <bstanle@wowway.com> wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I have installed Linux on many computers but this is the first time I had
> any problems. The computer is a new HP Pavilion Model dV6 laptop, I assume
> the HD is ATA Hitachi HTS54505. I used the Windows partitioning utility to
> resize the Windows partition so I would have some unused space (100 GB)
> where I could install Linux. This went smoothly and Windows ran smoothly
> with the reduced partition size. I used Windows about a month without any
> problems.
>
> Yesterday, I had some free time so I decided to install Xubuntu (12.04 - 64
> bit) and all seemed to go smoothly. The steps I followed were...
>
> I chose "something else" when prompted for the install type.
> I then set up the new partition table as
>
>
> sda1 - 1 MB - unknown (I did nothing here)
> sda2 - 208 MB - ntfs (I did nothing here)
> sda3 - 400000 MB - ntfs (The resized Windows partition
> I did nothing here)
> The free space was 100000 MB. I partitioned the free space as follows.
>
> (sda4 - No sda4 ???)
> sda5 - 7998 MB -logical partition - swap area
> sda6 - 49999 MB -logical partition - Ext4 - mount as /
> sda7 - 42003 MB -logical partition - Ext4 - mount as /home
> boot loader (GRUB) at dev/sda
>
>
> I then clicked on "Install now".
> I got the location map and then a pop window saying that an error occurred.
> It says...
>
>
> " ERROR!
> Error informing the kernel about modifications to partition 4 - Device or
> resource busy. This means Linux won't know about any changes made to
> /dev/sda4 until you reboot - so you shouldn't use it before rebooting"
>
>
> I thought this was insignificant since sda4 wasn't listed in the proposed
> partition scheme. I chose "ignore".
>
> Then I got the same message about sda5, sda6, and sda7. I knew something
> was amiss so I aborted the installation.
>
> The problem is that now I can't even boot into Windows because the
> installation attempted to install GRUB. I was able to save any user data to
> a flash drive before trying the failed install.
> I thought that this might be a Ubuntu only problem so I tried installing
> Mint. Same problem. The vexing thing was that I didn't get much of a clue
> to what was happening. Since Ubuntu and Mint are Debian based, I tried a
> different flavor of Linux - Open Suse. This time I did get an error message
> before partitioning even started. It said that the partition scheme on the
> HD and the partitioning tool, parted, were incompatible. (It might be nice
> if Ubuntu checked for partitioning problems before trying to repartition.)
> The error message that Open Suse gave was as follows...
>
>
> "The partitioning on disk dev/sda is not readable by the partitioning tool
> parted which is used to change the partition table.
>
> You can use the partitions on dev/sda as they are. ..."
>
>
> I did all the BIOS diagnostics and no hardware problems were detected. That
> is the history of what has been done. The laptop is unusable since I can't
> boot into Windows, luckily I had the foresight to get a Windows installation
> disks from HP. The Windows installation disk says that a repair can't be
> done and I must do a full reinstall. What can be done now? I assume that I
> should try to install Linux first and then Windows. Does anybody know about
> any new partitioning scheme that MS has come up with that would mess up
> Linux? I assume that if I reinstall Windows as is, I will run into the same
> mess when I try to install Linux.
>
> Sorry for the long message but I thought it wise to give as much information
> as possible to answer any questions you might have.

The PC MBR partitioning system only allows 4 primary partitions per
drive & you already had 3.

If the drive was partitioned with MBR, then you need to create an
extended partition as sda4 and then create the Linux partitions as
logical ones inside the extended partition.

The alternative to MBR on some modern machines is GUID.

If you boot off a LiveCD and run GParted, it should tell you.

I tend to recommend creating the partitions in advance with GParted
anyway - it offers more control & a better UI than the install
program.


--
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Old 08-17-2012, 07:02 PM
Kaj Haulrich
 
Default Problems with repartitioning a HP Pavilion Laptop

On 08/17/2012 08:03 PM, Bill Stanley wrote:

Hi,

I have installed Linux on many computers but this is the first time I
had any problems. The computer is a new HP Pavilion Model dV6 laptop, I
assume the HD is ATA Hitachi HTS54505. I used the Windows partitioning
utility to resize the Windows partition so I would have some unused
space (100 GB) where I could install Linux. This went smoothly and
Windows ran smoothly with the reduced partition size. I used Windows
about a month without any problems.

Yesterday, I had some free time so I decided to install Xubuntu (12.04 -
64 bit) and all seemed to go smoothly. The steps I followed were...

I chose "something else" when prompted for the install type.
I then set up the new partition table as


sda1 - 1 MB - unknown (I did nothing here)
sda2 - 208 MB - ntfs (I did nothing here)
sda3 - 400000 MB - ntfs (The resized Windows partition
I did nothing here)
The free space was 100000 MB. I partitioned the free space as follows.

(sda4 - No sda4 ???)
sda5 - 7998 MB -logical partition - swap area
sda6 - 49999 MB -logical partition - Ext4 - mount as /
sda7 - 42003 MB -logical partition - Ext4 - mount as /home
boot loader (GRUB) at dev/sda


I then clicked on "Install now".
I got the location map and then a pop window saying that an error
occurred. It says...


" ERROR!
Error informing the kernel about modifications to partition 4 - Device
or resource busy. This means Linux won't know about any changes made to
/dev/sda4 until you reboot - so you shouldn't use it before rebooting"


I thought this was insignificant since sda4 wasn't listed in the
proposed partition scheme. I chose "ignore".

Then I got the same message about sda5, sda6, and sda7. I knew
something was amiss so I aborted the installation.

The problem is that now I can't even boot into Windows because the
installation attempted to install GRUB. I was able to save any user
data to a flash drive before trying the failed install.
I thought that this might be a Ubuntu only problem so I tried installing
Mint. Same problem. The vexing thing was that I didn't get much of a
clue to what was happening. Since Ubuntu and Mint are Debian based, I
tried a different flavor of Linux - Open Suse. This time I did get an
error message before partitioning even started. It said that the
partition scheme on the HD and the partitioning tool, parted, were
incompatible. (It might be nice if Ubuntu checked for partitioning
problems before trying to repartition.) The error message that Open Suse
gave was as follows...


"The partitioning on disk dev/sda is not readable by the partitioning
tool parted which is used to change the partition table.

You can use the partitions on dev/sda as they are. ..."


I did all the BIOS diagnostics and no hardware problems were detected.
That is the history of what has been done. The laptop is unusable since
I can't boot into Windows, luckily I had the foresight to get a Windows
installation disks from HP. The Windows installation disk says that a
repair can't be done and I must do a full reinstall. What can be done
now? I assume that I should try to install Linux first and then
Windows. Does anybody know about any new partitioning scheme that MS
has come up with that would mess up Linux? I assume that if I reinstall
Windows as is, I will run into the same mess when I try to install Linux.

Sorry for the long message but I thought it wise to give as much
information as possible to answer any questions you might have.

Bill Stanley

I ran into similar hiccups with my - also new - Pavillon, until I
realized that it had this new thingy called UEFI rather than the good
old BIOS. If yours suffer from the same malady, the solution is to use
grub-efi during the install and tell it to install grub-efi on sda1
(something like 100 MB).


HTH
Kaj Haulrich.
--
--- Sent from a 100% Microsoft-free computer---
--------- Running Linux Kubuntu 12.10 ---------

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Old 08-17-2012, 08:14 PM
Bill Stanley
 
Default Problems with repartitioning a HP Pavilion Laptop

< snip >


I ran into similar hiccups with my - also new - Pavillon, until I
realized that it had this new thingy called UEFI rather than the good
old BIOS. If yours suffer from the same malady, the solution is to use
grub-efi during the install and tell it to install grub-efi on sda1
(something like 100 MB).


I was afraid I might run into this. There is no indication that UEFA is
the problem. I looked into the BIOS etc. Does anybody know more about
this? Where, other than HP tech support, can I find if it is on my
laptop, (it was purchased in late May). By the way, the Windows
version is Windows 7, so presumably the OS does not support UEFI. It
still could be in the hardware, just unused.


Bill Stanley

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Old 08-17-2012, 08:18 PM
Bill Stanley
 
Default Problems with repartitioning a HP Pavilion Laptop

On 08/17/2012 04:10 PM, Liam Proven wrote:

On 17 August 2012 21:07, Bill Stanley<bstanle@wowway.com> wrote:

The PC MBR partitioning system only allows 4 primary partitions per
drive& you already had 3.


If the drive was partitioned with MBR, then you need to create an
extended partition as sda4 and then create the Linux partitions as
logical ones inside the extended partition.

The alternative to MBR on some modern machines is GUID.

If you boot off a LiveCD and run GParted, it should tell you.

I tend to recommend creating the partitions in advance with GParted
anyway - it offers more control& a better UI than the install
program.



I used a USB flash drive to boot into Xubuntu and was able to run GParted.
I looked around the GUI and didn't find the information on if it is GUID.
Can you tell me where to find it?

I did find under VIEW/device information this info...

Model - ATA Hitachi HTS54505
Size - 465.76 GB
Path - /dev/sda

Partition Table - msdos
etc ...

The other information is very good as well it is (some columns were
omitted)...

Partition - - File system - Label - Flags
/dev/sda1 - (exclamation mark) - ntfs - SYSTEM - ...
/dev/sda2 - (exclamation mark) - ntfs - ... - boot
/dev/sda3 - ( ... ) - ntfs - New Volume - ...
/dev/sda4 - ( ... ) - extended - Recovery - ...
/dev/sda5 - ( ... ) - fat32 - HP Tools - ...
/dev/sda6 - (exclamation mark) - unknown
/dev/sda7 - (exclamation mark) - unknown
unallocated - ( ... ) - unallacated

It is obvious that the partition table is messed up by all the attempts at
installing Linux and then trying to recover the windows partition. As I
remember it, there were only sda1, sda2 and sda3 on the first attempt. What
should I do next? If I can make assumptions about sda1 and sda2 (the
exclamation mark), there is something wrong here and presumably it would be
better not to try to recover Windows, luckily, I have my user data. Should I
install Windows or Linux first? I know that a Windows reinstall will
overwrite the GRUB boot loader. But If I go with Windows first, I might not
get the option of leaving unallocated space for Linux.


Bill Stanley

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Old 08-17-2012, 09:52 PM
Jose I Diaz Bardales
 
Default Problems with repartitioning a HP Pavilion Laptop

On 08/17/2012 04:18 PM, Bill Stanley wrote:
> On 08/17/2012 04:10 PM, Liam Proven wrote:
>> On 17 August 2012 21:07, Bill Stanley<bstanle@wowway.com> wrote:
>>>> The PC MBR partitioning system only allows 4 primary partitions per
>>>> drive& you already had 3.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> If the drive was partitioned with MBR, then you need to create an
>>>> extended partition as sda4 and then create the Linux partitions as
>>>> logical ones inside the extended partition.
>>>>
>>>> The alternative to MBR on some modern machines is GUID.
>>>>
>>>> If you boot off a LiveCD and run GParted, it should tell you.
>>>>
>>>> I tend to recommend creating the partitions in advance with GParted
>>>> anyway - it offers more control& a better UI than the install
>>>> program.
>>>
>>>
>>> I used a USB flash drive to boot into Xubuntu and was able to run
>>> GParted.
>>> I looked around the GUI and didn't find the information on if it is
>>> GUID.
>>> Can you tell me where to find it?
>>>
>>> I did find under VIEW/device information this info...
>>>
>>> Model - ATA Hitachi HTS54505
>>> Size - 465.76 GB
>>> Path - /dev/sda
>>>
>>> Partition Table - msdos
>>> etc ...
>>>
>>> The other information is very good as well it is (some columns were
>>> omitted)...
>>>
>>> Partition - - File system - Label - Flags
>>> /dev/sda1 - (exclamation mark) - ntfs - SYSTEM - ...
>>> /dev/sda2 - (exclamation mark) - ntfs - ... - boot
>>> /dev/sda3 - ( ... ) - ntfs - New Volume - ...
>>> /dev/sda4 - ( ... ) - extended - Recovery - ...
>>> /dev/sda5 - ( ... ) - fat32 - HP Tools - ...
>>> /dev/sda6 - (exclamation mark) - unknown
>>> /dev/sda7 - (exclamation mark) - unknown
>>> unallocated - ( ... ) - unallacated
>>>
>>> It is obvious that the partition table is messed up by all the
>>> attempts at
>>> installing Linux and then trying to recover the windows partition. As I
>>> remember it, there were only sda1, sda2 and sda3 on the first
>>> attempt. What
>>> should I do next? If I can make assumptions about sda1 and sda2 (the
>>> exclamation mark), there is something wrong here and presumably it
>>> would be
>>> better not to try to recover Windows, luckily, I have my user data.
>>> Should I
>>> install Windows or Linux first? I know that a Windows reinstall will
>>> overwrite the GRUB boot loader. But If I go with Windows first, I
>>> might not
>>> get the option of leaving unallocated space for Linux.
>
> Bill Stanley
>

Mr Bill, If I were you, I would reinstall Windows with the
Windows-Installation-CD from HP then I would install Xubuntu, you can
delete your old partition while installing Xubuntu or thru
Gparted(LiveCD) as metioned previously by Liam.

Note: The small partition that you mention is probably where the windows
installation file are stored so that you can recover your Windows OS
(see the BIOS message when you computer start) or you might be able to
create a Windows-Cd-Recobery (which you already have from HP).

HTH







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Old 08-17-2012, 09:54 PM
Liam Proven
 
Default Problems with repartitioning a HP Pavilion Laptop

On 17 August 2012 22:52, Jose I Diaz Bardales <jose.dbardales@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Note: The small partition that you mention is probably where the windows
> installation file are stored so that you can recover your Windows OS
> (see the BIOS message when you computer start) or you might be able to
> create a Windows-Cd-Recobery (which you already have from HP).

Yes, I think this is the case.

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Old 08-17-2012, 10:04 PM
Liam Proven
 
Default Problems with repartitioning a HP Pavilion Laptop

On 17 August 2012 21:18, Bill Stanley <bstanle@wowway.com> wrote:
>>>
>>> I used a USB flash drive to boot into Xubuntu and was able to run
>>> GParted.

OK, good.

>>> I looked around the GUI and didn't find the information on if it is GUID.
>>> Can you tell me where to find it?
>>>
>>> I did find under VIEW/device information this info...
>>>
>>> Model - ATA Hitachi HTS54505
>>> Size - 465.76 GB
>>> Path - /dev/sda
>>>
>>> Partition Table - msdos

That's the important line. That means it's an MBR format drive.

>>> etc ...
>>>
>>> The other information is very good as well it is (some columns were
>>> omitted)...
>>>
>>> Partition - - File system - Label - Flags
>>> /dev/sda1 - (exclamation mark) - ntfs - SYSTEM - ...
>>> /dev/sda2 - (exclamation mark) - ntfs - ... - boot
>>> /dev/sda3 - ( ... ) - ntfs - New Volume - ...
>>> /dev/sda4 - ( ... ) - extended - Recovery - ...

OK, so this partition is the Extended partition. The question is, why
is it marked "Recovery"?

>>> /dev/sda5 - ( ... ) - fat32 - HP Tools - ...

Aha, and here we might have the answer. HP use a hidden recovery partition.

>>> /dev/sda6 - (exclamation mark) - unknown
>>> /dev/sda7 - (exclamation mark) - unknown

Those are probably your Linux root and swap partitions.

>>> unallocated - ( ... ) - unallacated

... and a bit of leftover space on the end.

>>> It is obvious that the partition table is messed up by all the attempts
>>> at
>>> installing Linux

Might be...

> and then trying to recover the windows partition.

Hang on, did I miss something here? Tell me more about the recovery stage?


> As I
>>> remember it, there were only sda1, sda2 and sda3 on the first attempt.

That sounds good and promising.

>>> What
>>> should I do next? If I can make assumptions about sda1 and sda2 (the
>>> exclamation mark), there is something wrong here and presumably it would
>>> be
>>> better not to try to recover Windows, luckily, I have my user data.
>>> Should I
>>> install Windows or Linux first? I know that a Windows reinstall will
>>> overwrite the GRUB boot loader. But If I go with Windows first, I might
>>> not
>>> get the option of leaving unallocated space for Linux.

If you are happy to reinstall, then what I'd do is wipe the disk
completely - there's a "create new partition table" option in GParted.

Then install Windows, but only use half the space, or as much as you
want to give over to Windows.

Then boot off your LiveUSB or whatever and run GParted.

You will probably have 3 primary partitions again, sda1/2/3.

Then what you do is:

[1] Create sda4 as an extended partition
[2] Inside it, create:
[2a] An sda5 partition of about 16GB as your root partition - this is
generous & leaves room for a lot of apps. Me, I'd use ext3 for this.
[2b] An sda6 "home" partition of all the remaining space, less how
much RAM you have multiplied by 2 (again, this is very conservative
and you won't need that much, but it is an easy rule of thumb and will
allow hibernation if you want it). I'd use ext4 for this.
[2c] An sda7 "swap" partition right on the end of 2xRAM in size. The
type is "Linux swap".

Then run the installer. Pick "other/custom" at the partitioning stage,
and tell it to use sda5 for / formatted ext3, don't reformat; sda6 as
/home, don't reformat; and sda6 as swap, which it will pick up
automatically.

Then continue installing as normal. Ubuntu will configure dual-boot for you.


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Old 08-17-2012, 10:38 PM
Doug
 
Default Problems with repartitioning a HP Pavilion Laptop

On 08/17/2012 02:03 PM, Bill Stanley wrote:

Hi,

I have installed Linux on many computers but this is the first time I
had any problems. The computer is a new HP Pavilion Model dV6 laptop,
I assume the HD is ATA Hitachi HTS54505. I used the Windows
partitioning utility to resize the Windows partition so I would have
some unused space (100 GB) where I could install Linux. This went
smoothly and Windows ran smoothly with the reduced partition size. I
used Windows about a month without any problems.


Yesterday, I had some free time so I decided to install Xubuntu (12.04
- 64 bit) and all seemed to go smoothly. The steps I followed were...


I chose "something else" when prompted for the install type.
I then set up the new partition table as


sda1 - 1 MB - unknown (I did nothing here)
sda2 - 208 MB - ntfs (I did nothing here)
sda3 - 400000 MB - ntfs (The resized Windows partition
I did nothing here)
The free space was 100000 MB. I partitioned the free space as follows.

(sda4 - No sda4 ???)
sda5 - 7998 MB -logical partition - swap area
sda6 - 49999 MB -logical partition - Ext4 - mount as /
sda7 - 42003 MB -logical partition - Ext4 - mount as /home
boot loader (GRUB) at dev/sda


I then clicked on "Install now".
I got the location map and then a pop window saying that an error
occurred. It says...



" ERROR!
Error informing the kernel about modifications to partition 4 - Device
or resource busy. This means Linux won't know about any changes made
to /dev/sda4 until you reboot - so you shouldn't use it before rebooting"



I thought this was insignificant since sda4 wasn't listed in the
proposed partition scheme. I chose "ignore".


Then I got the same message about sda5, sda6, and sda7. I knew
something was amiss so I aborted the installation.


The problem is that now I can't even boot into Windows because the
installation attempted to install GRUB. I was able to save any user
data to a flash drive before trying the failed install.
I thought that this might be a Ubuntu only problem so I tried
installing Mint. Same problem. The vexing thing was that I didn't
get much of a clue to what was happening. Since Ubuntu and Mint are
Debian based, I tried a different flavor of Linux - Open Suse. This
time I did get an error message before partitioning even started. It
said that the partition scheme on the HD and the partitioning tool,
parted, were incompatible. (It might be nice if Ubuntu checked for
partitioning problems before trying to repartition.) The error message
that Open Suse gave was as follows...



"The partitioning on disk dev/sda is not readable by the partitioning
tool parted which is used to change the partition table.


You can use the partitions on dev/sda as they are. ..."


I did all the BIOS diagnostics and no hardware problems were detected.
That is the history of what has been done. The laptop is unusable
since I can't boot into Windows, luckily I had the foresight to get a
Windows installation disks from HP. The Windows installation disk
says that a repair can't be done and I must do a full reinstall. What
can be done now? I assume that I should try to install Linux first
and then Windows. Does anybody know about any new partitioning scheme
that MS has come up with that would mess up Linux? I assume that if I
reinstall Windows as is, I will run into the same mess when I try to
install Linux.


Sorry for the long message but I thought it wise to give as much
information as possible to answer any questions you might have.


Bill Stanley

Perhaps if you use a Linux disk and boot into the Live system, you will
be able to see the files on the Windows partition. If that's the case,
you could then copy your data to an external hard drive or a thumb drive,
and then you could reinstall Windows. Altho it is reported to be
possible to install Linux first, you will have much less trouble if you
install Windows first! The partitioning problems you saw were probably a
symptom of HP putting some repair information on a partition that might
have been hidden. Probably that's gone, now, or not recoverable, but
with luck you don't need it. Assuming you have saved your files,
I would then wipe the disk altogether, using one of the various freebies
that writes all zeroes or all ones, and then partition the disk with
GParted or something similar and install Windows and then Linux. Then copy

the Windows data files back and you're good to go.

--doug

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Old 08-17-2012, 10:54 PM
Liam Proven
 
Default Problems with repartitioning a HP Pavilion Laptop

On 17 August 2012 23:38, Doug <dmcgarrett@optonline.net> wrote:

> Perhaps if you use a Linux disk and boot into the Live system, you will be
> able to see the files on the Windows partition. If that's the case, you
> could then copy your data to an external hard drive or a thumb drive,
> and then you could reinstall Windows.

This is true, but didn't the OP say he had a backup?

> Altho it is reported to be possible
> to install Linux first, you will have much less trouble if you install
> Windows first!

Strongly agree!

> The partitioning problems you saw were probably a
> symptom of HP putting some repair information on a partition that might have
> been hidden. Probably that's gone, now, or not recoverable, but with luck
> you don't need it.

Concur.

> Assuming you have saved your files,
> I would then wipe the disk altogether, using one of the various freebies
> that writes all zeroes or all ones,

He could indeed do that but it seems a bit overkill to me. Just
writing 1k of zeros to the boot sector would do it, and frankly, even
that is probably more than strictly necessary - just writing a new
empty partition table is probably enough.

[Thinks]

Although that might not get rid of the bit of GRUB in the MBR... blast.

OK, here is how to completely nuke the Master Boot Record:

dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hda1 bs=512 count=1

Best to do logged in as root (via `sudo -s`) or simply:

sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hda1 bs=512 count=1

BEWARE. THIS WILL ERASE EVERYTHING ON THE DISK & YOU WILL NOT BE ABLE
TO GET IT BACK.

Hint from here:
http://www.unixmen.com/how-to-erase-mbr-in-linux/

> and then partition the disk with GParted
> or something similar and install Windows and then Linux. Then copy
> the Windows data files back and you're good to go.

That is probably what I'd do myself, yes, but the snag is that Win7
likes to create a hidden system-recovery partition & AFAIK you can't
do that manually.


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Old 08-17-2012, 11:28 PM
Felix Miata
 
Default Problems with repartitioning a HP Pavilion Laptop

On 2012/08/17 23:04 (GMT+0100) Liam Proven composed:


[2c] An sda7 "swap" partition right on the end of 2xRAM in size. The
type is "Linux swap".


I've never did a comprehensive HD I/O test where the end wasn't far and away
the slowest bunch of sectors on the device. I always put swap near the front,
typically ahead of the first / and not on a primary.

--
"The wise are known for their understanding, and pleasant
words are persuasive." Proverbs 16:21 (New Living Translation)

Team OS/2 ** Reg. Linux User #211409 ** a11y rocks!

Felix Miata *** http://fm.no-ip.com/

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