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Old 07-19-2012, 09:26 PM
scar
 
Default encrypted home directory / wrapped-passphrase

hi i used the ecryptfs-migrate-home command to encrypt my home
directory, and during that process i am told:

************************************************** **********************
YOU SHOULD RECORD YOUR MOUNT PASSPHRASE AND STORE IT IN A SAFE LOCATION.
ecryptfs-unwrap-passphrase ~/.ecryptfs/wrapped-passphrase
THIS WILL BE REQUIRED IF YOU NEED TO RECOVER YOUR DATA AT A LATER TIME.
************************************************** **********************

so i run that command and get the ~/.ecryptfs/wrapped-passphrase file,
which it seems to me should be moved elsewhere, like removable storage,
since it sounds like this file is to be used when i forget my password.

however, when i move that file, my home directory no longer gets
decrypted when i log in and i get all these errors starting with one
about .ICEauthority file or something.

if i move that wrapped-passphrase file back to ~/.ecryptfs then things
get decrypted when i log in. so it seems like that file is necessary
but its also stored in an unencrypted location for whomever steals my
computer to use to decrypt my home directory, defeating the whole point
of encryption. i guess i'm obviously not understanding something here,
can someone clarify? thanks



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Old 07-19-2012, 11:48 PM
NoOp
 
Default encrypted home directory / wrapped-passphrase

On 07/19/2012 02:26 PM, scar wrote:
> hi i used the ecryptfs-migrate-home command to encrypt my home
> directory, and during that process i am told:
>
> ************************************************** **********************
> YOU SHOULD RECORD YOUR MOUNT PASSPHRASE AND STORE IT IN A SAFE LOCATION.
> ecryptfs-unwrap-passphrase ~/.ecryptfs/wrapped-passphrase
> THIS WILL BE REQUIRED IF YOU NEED TO RECOVER YOUR DATA AT A LATER TIME.
> ************************************************** **********************
>
> so i run that command and get the ~/.ecryptfs/wrapped-passphrase file,
> which it seems to me should be moved elsewhere, like removable storage,
> since it sounds like this file is to be used when i forget my password.
>
> however, when i move that file, my home directory no longer gets
> decrypted when i log in and i get all these errors starting with one
> about .ICEauthority file or something.
>
> if i move that wrapped-passphrase file back to ~/.ecryptfs then things
> get decrypted when i log in. so it seems like that file is necessary
> but its also stored in an unencrypted location for whomever steals my
> computer to use to decrypt my home directory, defeating the whole point
> of encryption. i guess i'm obviously not understanding something here,
> can someone clarify? thanks
>

This might help:
http://ecryptfs.sourceforge.net/ecryptfs-pam-doc.txt





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Old 07-20-2012, 02:52 PM
Basil Chupin
 
Default encrypted home directory / wrapped-passphrase

On 20/07/12 07:26, scar wrote:

hi i used the ecryptfs-migrate-home command to encrypt my home
directory, and during that process i am told:

************************************************** **********************
YOU SHOULD RECORD YOUR MOUNT PASSPHRASE AND STORE IT IN A SAFE LOCATION.
ecryptfs-unwrap-passphrase ~/.ecryptfs/wrapped-passphrase
THIS WILL BE REQUIRED IF YOU NEED TO RECOVER YOUR DATA AT A LATER TIME.
************************************************** **********************

so i run that command and get the ~/.ecryptfs/wrapped-passphrase file,
which it seems to me should be moved elsewhere, like removable storage,
since it sounds like this file is to be used when i forget my password.

however, when i move that file, my home directory no longer gets
decrypted when i log in and i get all these errors starting with one
about .ICEauthority file or something.

if i move that wrapped-passphrase file back to ~/.ecryptfs then things
get decrypted when i log in. so it seems like that file is necessary
but its also stored in an unencrypted location for whomever steals my
computer to use to decrypt my home directory, defeating the whole point
of encryption. i guess i'm obviously not understanding something here,
can someone clarify? thanks


You should look carefully into this question of encrypting your home
directory.


Doing such an encryption of your home directory under the belief that
you are actually making the data stored in /home totally secure is a
delusion.


For example, on one of my computers I have the /home encrypted.

WOW, I thought. All this data is now safe!

Well, I have an external HDD which I use for backing up my /home
directory. But what I found is that anyone can read that backed-up /home
directory on the external HDD because once you copy it you lose all the
encryption UNLESS you have the destination also encrypted. I won't
explain further but I think I have my point.


Now for the next part.

I did an upgrade to my system - it was an upgrade of the kernel actually
- after which I could not boot into the system. Nothing I tried to do
could get me into the system using Rescue Disc etc etc because I had an
encrypted /home directory and I needed to provide the passphrase in
order to be able to access /home but nothing in the Rescue Disc asked me
for such a passphrase - the only thing it was interested in was to be
able to mount the /home partition, which, of course, was encrypted.


After fooling around for a few days and agonising about the thought of
losing all data (some irreplaceable) in the /home directory, I
discovered a few simple command line entries which completely bypassed
the encryption I had on my /home directory and allowed me to boot into
the system and fix up the mess created by the upgrade to the kernel! So
much for encryption!


I then abandoned the whole idea of encrypting the /home directory as a
complete waste of time and effort.


You want security and encryption? Then encrypt your whole
installation/file system and not just your /home directory. But if you
go this way it will be at a cost of slowing down the operation of your
whole system.


Take some time off and read up about encryption/encrypting your file
system - and NOT just your /home directory.


BC

--
Using openSUSE 12.2 x86_64 KDE 4.8.4 & kernel 3.4.4.2 on a system with-
AMD FX 8-core 3.6/4.2GHz processor
16GB PC14900/1866MHz Quad Channel Corsair "Vengeance" RAM
Gigabyte AMD3+ m/board; Gigabyte nVidia GTX550Ti 1GB DDR5 GPU


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Old 07-21-2012, 11:50 AM
Nolan
 
Default encrypted home directory / wrapped-passphrase

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

On 07/20/2012 07:52 AM, Basil Chupin wrote:
> On 20/07/12 07:26, scar wrote:
>> hi i used the ecryptfs-migrate-home command to encrypt my home
>> directory, and during that process i am told:
>>
>> ************************************************** **********************
>> YOU SHOULD RECORD YOUR MOUNT PASSPHRASE AND STORE IT IN A SAFE LOCATION.
>> ecryptfs-unwrap-passphrase ~/.ecryptfs/wrapped-passphrase
>> THIS WILL BE REQUIRED IF YOU NEED TO RECOVER YOUR DATA AT A LATER TIME.
>> ************************************************** **********************
>>
>> so i run that command and get the ~/.ecryptfs/wrapped-passphrase file,
>> which it seems to me should be moved elsewhere, like removable storage,
>> since it sounds like this file is to be used when i forget my password.
>>
>> however, when i move that file, my home directory no longer gets
>> decrypted when i log in and i get all these errors starting with one
>> about .ICEauthority file or something.
>>
>> if i move that wrapped-passphrase file back to ~/.ecryptfs then things
>> get decrypted when i log in. so it seems like that file is necessary
>> but its also stored in an unencrypted location for whomever steals my
>> computer to use to decrypt my home directory, defeating the whole point
>> of encryption. i guess i'm obviously not understanding something here,
>> can someone clarify? thanks
>
> You should look carefully into this question of encrypting your home directory.
>
> Doing such an encryption of your home directory under the belief that you are actually
> making the data stored in /home totally secure is a delusion.
>
> For example, on one of my computers I have the /home encrypted.
>
> WOW, I thought. All this data is now safe!
>
> Well, I have an external HDD which I use for backing up my /home directory. But what I
> found is that anyone can read that backed-up /home directory on the external HDD because
> once you copy it you lose all the encryption UNLESS you have the destination also
> encrypted. I won't explain further but I think I have my point.
>
> Now for the next part.
>
> I did an upgrade to my system - it was an upgrade of the kernel actually - after which I
> could not boot into the system. Nothing I tried to do could get me into the system using
> Rescue Disc etc etc because I had an encrypted /home directory and I needed to provide the
> passphrase in order to be able to access /home but nothing in the Rescue Disc asked me for
> such a passphrase - the only thing it was interested in was to be able to mount the /home
> partition, which, of course, was encrypted.
>
> After fooling around for a few days and agonising about the thought of losing all data
> (some irreplaceable) in the /home directory, I discovered a few simple command line
> entries which completely bypassed the encryption I had on my /home directory and allowed
> me to boot into the system and fix up the mess created by the upgrade to the kernel! So
> much for encryption!
>
> I then abandoned the whole idea of encrypting the /home directory as a complete waste of
> time and effort.
>
> You want security and encryption? Then encrypt your whole installation/file system and not
> just your /home directory. But if you go this way it will be at a cost of slowing down the
> operation of your whole system.
>
> Take some time off and read up about encryption/encrypting your file system - and NOT just
> your /home directory.
>
> BC
>

Basil...
Would zipping the "/home" directory and giving it a strong password
accomplish all or at least most of what you want?
Nolan
- --
Nolan Cooper Linux User: 190812 Debian/Ubuntu-12.04==*Precise Pangolin*
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Old 07-21-2012, 04:37 PM
C de-Avillez
 
Default encrypted home directory / wrapped-passphrase

On Thu, 19 Jul 2012 14:26:35 -0700
scar <scar@drigon.com> wrote:

> hi i used the ecryptfs-migrate-home command to encrypt my home
> directory, and during that process i am told:
>
> ************************************************** **********************
> YOU SHOULD RECORD YOUR MOUNT PASSPHRASE AND STORE IT IN A SAFE
> LOCATION. ecryptfs-unwrap-passphrase ~/.ecryptfs/wrapped-passphrase
> THIS WILL BE REQUIRED IF YOU NEED TO RECOVER YOUR DATA AT A LATER
> TIME.
> ************************************************** **********************

Yes. This encrypted passphrase should be saved -- unencrypted (and
probably re-encrypted with another key).

> so i run that command and get the ~/.ecryptfs/wrapped-passphrase file,
> which it seems to me should be moved elsewhere, like removable
> storage, since it sounds like this file is to be used when i forget
> my password.

No, this file should be kept there -- otherwise it will not be possible
to decrypt your ecryptfs.


>
> however, when i move that file, my home directory no longer gets
> decrypted when i log in and i get all these errors starting with one
> about .ICEauthority file or something.

Yep -- the ecrypfs utils will automagically decrypt this passphrase,
and pass it over to the ecryptfs -- which will, then, be able to mount
and use your home directory.

>
> if i move that wrapped-passphrase file back to ~/.ecryptfs then things
> get decrypted when i log in. so it seems like that file is necessary
> but its also stored in an unencrypted location for whomever steals my
> computer to use to decrypt my home directory, defeating the whole
> point of encryption. i guess i'm obviously not understanding
> something here, can someone clarify? thanks

You might be interested in the stackexchange page about ecryptfs [1] --
a lot of questions and answers about ecryptfs.

There is also a excrow service from Gazzang [2].

Cheers,

..C..



[1] http://stackexchange.com/search?q=ecryptfs
[2] http://gazzang.com/products/zescrow

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Old 07-21-2012, 05:34 PM
C de-Avillez
 
Default encrypted home directory / wrapped-passphrase

On Sat, 21 Jul 2012 11:37:01 -0500
C de-Avillez <hggdh2@ubuntu.com> wrote:

> There is also a excrow service from Gazzang [2].

Argh! This is a record for me...

s/excrow/escrow/

Sorry.

p.s. One has to stop and try to figure out an ex-crow...
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Old 07-23-2012, 07:37 AM
Basil Chupin
 
Default encrypted home directory / wrapped-passphrase

On 21/07/12 21:50, Nolan wrote:

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

On 07/20/2012 07:52 AM, Basil Chupin wrote:

On 20/07/12 07:26, scar wrote:

hi i used the ecryptfs-migrate-home command to encrypt my home
directory, and during that process i am told:

************************************************** **********************
YOU SHOULD RECORD YOUR MOUNT PASSPHRASE AND STORE IT IN A SAFE LOCATION.
ecryptfs-unwrap-passphrase ~/.ecryptfs/wrapped-passphrase
THIS WILL BE REQUIRED IF YOU NEED TO RECOVER YOUR DATA AT A LATER TIME.
************************************************** **********************

so i run that command and get the ~/.ecryptfs/wrapped-passphrase file,
which it seems to me should be moved elsewhere, like removable storage,
since it sounds like this file is to be used when i forget my password.

however, when i move that file, my home directory no longer gets
decrypted when i log in and i get all these errors starting with one
about .ICEauthority file or something.

if i move that wrapped-passphrase file back to ~/.ecryptfs then things
get decrypted when i log in. so it seems like that file is necessary
but its also stored in an unencrypted location for whomever steals my
computer to use to decrypt my home directory, defeating the whole point
of encryption. i guess i'm obviously not understanding something here,
can someone clarify? thanks

You should look carefully into this question of encrypting your home directory.

Doing such an encryption of your home directory under the belief that you are actually
making the data stored in /home totally secure is a delusion.

For example, on one of my computers I have the /home encrypted.

WOW, I thought. All this data is now safe!

Well, I have an external HDD which I use for backing up my /home directory. But what I
found is that anyone can read that backed-up /home directory on the external HDD because
once you copy it you lose all the encryption UNLESS you have the destination also
encrypted. I won't explain further but I think I have my point.

Now for the next part.

I did an upgrade to my system - it was an upgrade of the kernel actually - after which I
could not boot into the system. Nothing I tried to do could get me into the system using
Rescue Disc etc etc because I had an encrypted /home directory and I needed to provide the
passphrase in order to be able to access /home but nothing in the Rescue Disc asked me for
such a passphrase - the only thing it was interested in was to be able to mount the /home
partition, which, of course, was encrypted.

After fooling around for a few days and agonising about the thought of losing all data
(some irreplaceable) in the /home directory, I discovered a few simple command line
entries which completely bypassed the encryption I had on my /home directory and allowed
me to boot into the system and fix up the mess created by the upgrade to the kernel! So
much for encryption!

I then abandoned the whole idea of encrypting the /home directory as a complete waste of
time and effort.

You want security and encryption? Then encrypt your whole installation/file system and not
just your /home directory. But if you go this way it will be at a cost of slowing down the
operation of your whole system.

Take some time off and read up about encryption/encrypting your file system - and NOT just
your /home directory.

BC


Basil...
Would zipping the "/home" directory and giving it a strong password
accomplish all or at least most of what you want?
Nolan
The simple and honest answer is: I don't know as I have never tried to
do it, or considered it - nor am I a security expert :-) .


But if you think about it, in this situation what you would be doing is
simply creating an archived copy of your home directory in a passworded
zip format file. The archive *may* be a bit of headache for someone who
tries to get into it but not impossible for those with the right
equipment, but the ORIGINAL home directory is still a piece of cake to
get into - as I found out :-( . Look here:


https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Removing_System_Encryption

And, depending on which part of the world you are living in, there are
laws which REQUIRE you (under the penalty of having your genitals
removed with wire-cutters [if you are male that is :-) ]) to provide the
government authorities (you know the ones) with the password you have
used to encrypt your zip file *OR*, repeat OR, your *whole* (file)
system for that matter! (There is discussion about this but which I
won't go into here; but have a look in the Wikipedia, for example, about
this subject of encryption).


BC

--
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AMD FX 8-core 3.6/4.2GHz processor
16GB PC14900/1866MHz Quad Channel Corsair "Vengeance" RAM
Gigabyte AMD3+ m/board; Gigabyte nVidia GTX550Ti 1GB DDR5 GPU


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Old 07-23-2012, 08:20 AM
Ric Moore
 
Default encrypted home directory / wrapped-passphrase

On 07/23/2012 03:37 AM, Basil Chupin wrote:


And, depending on which part of the world you are living in, there are
laws which REQUIRE you (under the penalty of having your genitals
removed with wire-cutters [if you are male that is :-) ]) to provide the
government authorities (you know the ones) with the password you have
used to encrypt your zip file *OR*, repeat OR, your *whole* (file)
system for that matter! (There is discussion about this but which I
won't go into here; but have a look in the Wikipedia, for example, about
this subject of encryption).


Being grey haired and lazy, I've always looked askance at going the
encryption route. I am just wondering though, if I had something that
really needed double-naught protection can a CD or DVD be created with
an encrypted file system, with the aforementioned Top-Secret files, in a
ISO burn?


If the storm troopers were breaking down your doors, I guess you could
just snap the CD/DVD in half to really screw them over when they try to
glue an encrypted broken-in-half media back for recovery purposes.


Then bite down hard on the cyanide tablet embedded in your left rear
molar ...for Queen and Country. <cackles> 00-Ric


--
My father, Victor Moore (Vic) used to say:
"There are two Great Sins in the world...
..the Sin of Ignorance, and the Sin of Stupidity.
Only the former may be overcome." R.I.P. Dad.
http://linuxcounter.net/user/44256.html



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Old 07-23-2012, 10:31 AM
Basil Chupin
 
Default encrypted home directory / wrapped-passphrase

On 23/07/12 18:20, Ric Moore wrote:

On 07/23/2012 03:37 AM, Basil Chupin wrote:


And, depending on which part of the world you are living in, there are
laws which REQUIRE you (under the penalty of having your genitals
removed with wire-cutters [if you are male that is :-) ]) to provide the
government authorities (you know the ones) with the password you have
used to encrypt your zip file *OR*, repeat OR, your *whole* (file)
system for that matter! (There is discussion about this but which I
won't go into here; but have a look in the Wikipedia, for example, about
this subject of encryption).


Being grey haired and lazy, I've always looked askance at going the
encryption route. I am just wondering though, if I had something that
really needed double-naught protection can a CD or DVD be created with
an encrypted file system, with the aforementioned Top-Secret files, in
a ISO burn?


No idea but I assume that the creation of such a CD or DVD would be of
little trouble. And why not? Simply use encryption when creating such an
ISO CD or DVD. Piece of cake I would think.




If the storm troopers were breaking down your doors, I guess you could
just snap the CD/DVD in half to really screw them over when they try
to glue an encrypted broken-in-half media back for recovery purposes.


Ah, now is where you have gone off the rails I am afraid.

Firstly, have you ever tried to snap a CD or a DVD in half? Try it :-) .
The damn things are unbreakable unless you have bionic arms and hands :-) .


You wanna destroy a CD/DVD really quickly then you need a microwave
oven, with its own power supply 'cause Oceania's Big Brother people
would probably cut your power before they comes 'round "knocking" on
your door, which will zap your CD/DVD in a matter of less than 5 seconds
when set to HIGH :-) .


You remember the times during, and well before, when Bill Clinton was
the Prezz when the U-S-of-A used to harrass the Chinese by flying planes
close to or into the Chinese air space until one time when one of the
U-S-of-A planes struck the wing of one of the Chinese jets sent to
intercept the U-S-of-A plane and the Chinese jet crashed killing the
Chinese pilot. (The U-S-of-A paid a hansom (?)$US7 million in
compensation to the pilot's family.) Anyway, this clash of planes also
caused the U-S-of-A spy plane to be brought down in some southern part
of China and the Chinese captured it intact. The point here is that the
plane was carrying highly secret tech equipment on board - and the crew
on board did not get the chance to destroy the data on the HDDs used by
the onboard computer equipment.


Now, we ALL know that the military have sooper-dooper pooper-scoopers to
destroy sensitive information. You can get them online in fact, but be
prepared to sit back for a few days while the "scrubber" does its work :-)


I wonder if all the U-S-of-A planes now carry microwave ovens onboard? :-) .

(The other interesting part of this story is that following that
incident no U-S-of-A plane ever again harrassed Chinese air space.)



Then bite down hard on the cyanide tablet embedded in your left rear
molar ...for Queen and Country. <cackles> 00-Ric


....and then lie back and think of England :-) .

But hold on, in your case it's supposed to be Obama, or Romney (Joseph
Smith bless him)?


Also, I thought that in "your" case it would be "for truth, justice and
the AMERICAN way." rather than, "for Queen and Country.":-)


(Have any spare cyanide pills in the cupboard?)

BC

--
Using openSUSE 12.2 x86_64 KDE 4.8.4 & kernel 3.4.5-1 on a system with-
AMD FX 8-core 3.6/4.2GHz processor
16GB PC14900/1866MHz Quad Channel Corsair "Vengeance" RAM
Gigabyte AMD3+ m/board; Gigabyte nVidia GTX550Ti 1GB DDR5 GPU


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Old 07-23-2012, 12:25 PM
C de-Avillez
 
Default encrypted home directory / wrapped-passphrase

On Mon, 23 Jul 2012 17:37:55 +1000
Basil Chupin <blchupin@iinet.net.au> wrote:
> but the ORIGINAL home directory is still a
> piece of cake to get into - as I found out :-( . Look here:
>
> https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Removing_System_Encryption

Sorry, I am somewhat lost here. The link talks about "an encrypted root
filesystem or other filesystem you cannot umount while booted into your
operating system", and how to "remove system encryption". Nobody is
talking, there, about *bypassing* encryption. So, yes, it is easy to
get access to your home directory after taking out encryption -- this
is the whole idea of the write-up.

BTW, it is a common mistake (and I myself have also gotten hit by it)
to forget about encrypting backups. Your hardrive is encrypted (or your
home directory, or some other FS) with ecryptfs or equivalent. Good.
But copies to somewhere else will be encrypted (or not) depending if
ecryptfs is active (or not) on this other medium.

Cheers,

..C..
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