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Old 06-23-2012, 06:08 PM
 
Default Transferring my install to new computer

Greetings all:

I have 10.4 LTS on my ASUS eeepc netbook. It now has a power problem and will not boot. The hard drive is fine.

At the moment I need to be out of town in a few days and cannot wait for the parts to repair and I MUST have a functioning laptop. I have a acer aspire 5100 I could take on my trip. Ideally I want all my existing install to be on that machine. I have two options:

(1) I can install 10.04 (or 12.04 which I was planning at some point) and restore my /home from backup. The only loss would be a day worth of email that did not make the backup.

(2) I could install the hard drive from the netbook into the laptop and boot it.

I know that the first will work, and is the safer bet. The real question is if #2 will work? Please assume that the hard drives are compatible. Obviously I will have to confirm this. But will an existing installation boot on completely different hardware? If so, would there be things I need to do to make it work properly?

Thanks

--PE

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Old 06-23-2012, 06:12 PM
Liam Proven
 
Default Transferring my install to new computer

On 23 June 2012 19:08, <p.echols@comcast.net> wrote:
> Greetings all:
>
> I have 10.4 LTS on my ASUS eeepc netbook. *It now has a power problem and will not boot. *The hard drive is fine.
>
> At the moment I need to be out of town in a few days and cannot wait for the parts to repair and I MUST have a functioning laptop. *I have a acer aspire 5100 I could take on my trip. *Ideally I want all my existing install to be on that machine. *I have two options:
>
> (1) I can install 10.04 (or 12.04 which I was planning at some point) and restore my /home from backup. *The only loss would be a day worth of email that did not make the backup.
>
> (2) I could install the hard drive from the netbook into the laptop and boot it.
>
> I know that the first will work, and is the safer bet. *The real question is if #2 will work? *Please assume that the hard drives are compatible. *Obviously I will have to confirm this. *But will an existing installation boot on completely different hardware? *If so, would there be things I need to do to make it work properly?

Linux isn't Windows. Yes, the same hard disk should work fine in your
other computer. If you had proprietary graphics drivers on the old
machine (seems unlikely, on a netbook) then you might want to remove
them - & if necessary install new, appropriate ones. Otherwise, you
should be fine.

Of course, there would be no harm in doing an image-backup of the
netbook drive before you reinstall it, if you have the space. Look at
tools such as `fsarchiver`, `partimage` or `partclone`.


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Old 06-23-2012, 06:31 PM
 
Default Transferring my install to new computer

----- Original Message -----
> From: "Liam Proven" <lproven@gmail.com>
> To: "Ubuntu user technical support, not for general discussions" <ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com>
> Sent: Saturday, June 23, 2012 11:12:28 AM
> Subject: Re: Transferring my install to new computer
> On 23 June 2012 19:08, <p.echols@comcast.net> wrote:
> > Greetings all:
> >
> > I have 10.4 LTS on my ASUS eeepc netbook. It now has a power problem
> > and will not boot. The hard drive is fine.
> >
> > At the moment I need to be out of town in a few days and cannot wait
> > for the parts to repair and I MUST have a functioning laptop. I have
> > a acer aspire 5100 I could take on my trip. Ideally I want all my
> > existing install to be on that machine. I have two options:
> >
> > (1) I can install 10.04 (or 12.04 which I was planning at some
> > point) and restore my /home from backup. The only loss would be a
> > day worth of email that did not make the backup.
> >
> > (2) I could install the hard drive from the netbook into the laptop
> > and boot it.
> >
> > I know that the first will work, and is the safer bet. The real
> > question is if #2 will work? Please assume that the hard drives are
> > compatible. Obviously I will have to confirm this. But will an
> > existing installation boot on completely different hardware? If so,
> > would there be things I need to do to make it work properly?
>
> Linux isn't Windows. Yes, the same hard disk should work fine in your
> other computer. If you had proprietary graphics drivers on the old
> machine (seems unlikely, on a netbook) then you might want to remove
> them - & if necessary install new, appropriate ones. Otherwise, you
> should be fine.
>
> Of course, there would be no harm in doing an image-backup of the
> netbook drive before you reinstall it, if you have the space. Look at
> tools such as `fsarchiver`, `partimage` or `partclone`.
>
>

Thanks Liam, that's kind of what I thought, but was not sure. Imaging the drive is a great idea, but the HD has to be connected to something. What I may do is install the harddrive, but boot the acer from a clonezilla CD and image to a usb drive. It won't be fast, but I have all the pieces I'll need.

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Old 06-23-2012, 07:31 PM
Liam Proven
 
Default Transferring my install to new computer

On 23 June 2012 19:31, <p.echols@comcast.net> wrote:
>
> Thanks Liam, that's kind of what I thought, but was not sure. *Imaging the drive is a great idea, but the HD has to be connected to something. *What I may do is install the harddrive, but boot the acer from a clonezilla CD and image to a usb drive. *It won't be fast, but I have all the pieces I'll need.

Ah. I keep a couple of those external-drive-USB cables handy. They're
only about £3 and a real lifesaver.

But yes, what you propose should work fine. Many tools can compress
the image so you won't need a block of space the size of the whole
drive. Don't bother backing up the swap partition and empty /tmp
before you do it.

Beware if you are using a FAT32 USB drive - it only supports a max
file size of 2GB, IIRC, which is probably not enough, so you'd need to
split your backup into many pieces.


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Old 06-23-2012, 08:04 PM
Nils Kassube
 
Default Transferring my install to new computer

Liam Proven wrote:
> But yes, what you propose should work fine. Many tools can compress
> the image so you won't need a block of space the size of the whole
> drive. Don't bother backing up the swap partition and empty /tmp
> before you do it.

And to improve the compression even further you could overwrite the
remaining space of the disk with a big file of zeros. You could use
something like the command

dd if=/dev/zero of=zero

in a terminal. After the command exits (with an error message about no
space left on the device) you can delete the file "zero" (from the
example above) to regain the free space.


Nils

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Old 06-23-2012, 09:08 PM
Liam Proven
 
Default Transferring my install to new computer

On 23 June 2012 21:04, Nils Kassube <kassube@gmx.net> wrote:
> Liam Proven wrote:
>> But yes, what you propose should work fine. Many tools can compress
>> the image so you won't need a block of space the size of the whole
>> drive. Don't bother backing up the swap partition and empty /tmp
>> before you do it.
>
> And to improve the compression even further you could overwrite the
> remaining space of the disk with a big file of zeros. You could use
> something like the command
>
> dd if=/dev/zero of=zero
>
> in a terminal. After the command exits (with an error message about no
> space left on the device) you can delete the file "zero" (from the
> example above) to regain the free space.

That's true, but surely any vaguely smart filesystem-imaging tool will
only copy occupied space?


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Old 06-23-2012, 10:05 PM
William Scott Lockwood III
 
Default Transferring my install to new computer

On Jun 23, 2012 4:09 PM, "Liam Proven" <lproven@gmail.com> wrote:

> > And to improve the compression even further you could overwrite the

> > remaining space of the disk with a big file of zeros. You could use

> > something like the command

> >

> > dd if=/dev/zero of=zero

> >

> > in a terminal. After the command exits (with an error message about no

> > space left on the device) you can delete the file "zero" (from the

> > example above) to regain the free space.

>

> That's true, but surely any vaguely smart filesystem-imaging tool will

> only copy occupied space?


Not in my experience. Here is how I have done this in the past when migrating p2v (physical to virtual).


1. Obtain total file size on drive.

2. Create a sparse disk that is 25% larger than that on the target system.

3. Copy the drive contents from one to the other with rsync. Be sure to use the -x flag, as this will not span file systems. Thus, things like /proc and /sys are not copied over.

4. Mount the new disk (typically from the xen server, or whatever technology you are using).

5. Chroot.

6. Obtain or set the disk's ID in /etc/fstab for the new disk.

. 7. Run grub.


This should get it to boot, and you can fix things like networking at that point.

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Old 06-24-2012, 03:45 PM
Avi Greenbury
 
Default Transferring my install to new computer

Liam Proven wrote:
> That's true, but surely any vaguely smart filesystem-imaging tool will
> only copy occupied space?

A filesystem imaging tool would be expected to copy the filesystem
which includes the 'empty' space[0]. If you're only interested in the
extant files you'd normally use a file copy program.

--
Avi

[0] I imagine may would have an option to not, but it's not uncommon to
take an image of the disc precisely to take interest in the
unoccupied space, such as when recovering deleted files.

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Old 06-24-2012, 04:01 PM
Liam Proven
 
Default Transferring my install to new computer

On 24 June 2012 16:45, Avi Greenbury <lists@avi.co> wrote:
> Liam Proven wrote:
>> That's true, but surely any vaguely smart filesystem-imaging tool will
>> only copy occupied space?
>
> A filesystem imaging tool would be expected to copy the filesystem
> which includes the 'empty' space[0]. If you're only interested in the
> extant files you'd normally use a file copy program.

Hmm. I am not sure about the likes of GParted, which I have found to
be very slow and not progress significantly quicker on near-empty
partitions than on near-full ones. More mature tools like
PartitionMagic certainly only copy occupied space and it takes about
10% of the time to copy a 100MB partition with 10MB used than a 100MB
partition that's full.

But these are partition /copiers/ not /imagers./ Tools like partclone
or fsarchiver don't copy partition-to-partition but partition-to-file
or file-to-partition. I have used both quite a lot recently and found,
as I'd expect, that copying a smallish near-full partition is slow and
gives a large data file whereas copying a large but nearly-empty
partition is much quicker and yields a very small image file. This is
what I'd expect - that unused space is ignored.

> [0] I imagine may would have an option to not, but it's not uncommon to
> take an image of the disc precisely to take interest in the
> unoccupied space, such as when recovering deleted files.

That sounds more like a data-recovery or forensics tool, which is a
different category of application, at least in my book.

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Old 06-24-2012, 04:10 PM
"compdoc"
 
Default Transferring my install to new computer

>> That's true, but surely any vaguely smart filesystem-imaging tool
>> will only copy occupied space?
>
> A filesystem imaging tool would be expected to copy the filesystem
> which includes the 'empty' space[0]. If you're only interested in the
> extant files you'd normally use a file copy program.

Clonezilla ignores the empty space and you end up with an image that's only
as large as the amount of space used by the files. However, clonezilla
cannot do this with partitions created using LVM. In that case, its forced
to do a bit-copy which creates an image the size of the device being imaged.


That's actually a large reason of why I switched from Centos to Ubuntu - no
LVM used in the install process.




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