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Old 04-30-2012, 05:51 PM
Bill Stanley
 
Default Serious upgrade problem! My computer previously was 64 bit and now is 32 bit.

On 04/30/2012 01:09 PM, Chris Green wrote:

On Mon, Apr 30, 2012 at 01:01:20PM -0400, Bill Stanley wrote:
[snip tale of woe]


I also notice that the boot time is significantly longer. The boot
time for the original installation, 10.10, (turning on,logging in
and finally being able to run applications) was less than 30
seconds. For this version upgrade (version 11.10) the boot time can
be as much as 3 to 4 minutes. This might be due to the wrong OS
being used.


You can't upgrade directly from version 10.10 to version 11.10 so I
suspect something else has happened.


This is true! I had to go through two steps to get to 11.10 so maybe
the error was in the first step. This doesn't alter the fact that the
OS was changed from 64 bit to 32 bit.



Having established that the OS upgrade is in error, I now have to
manually change from the 32 bit version to the 64 bit version
without losing my data. Not having to completely replace the OS
before, I would like instructions on how best to proceed.


You will always lose *some* settings and stuff.

You need to back up /home, /etc and /var, to somewhere *off* the system
you are restoring. Then do a clean install of the OS you want, then
restore /home from your backups and the bits and pieces needed from /etc
and /var.


I'm not too concerned about the changes to data that is not in the home
directory. Some of the user settings might be lost and I understand
that. I can recover from that, I am just worried about losing data in
the documents, pectures etc. My computer has two HDs (the other one is
Windows 7 which is mostly unused) I copied my critical data to a
directory there (I hope Win 7 will be unaffected by this) so it relly
wont be lost if a real disaster happens. Still I don't really want to
do a restore from the saved data on the Win 7 HD. I will also save the
/etc and /var directories, but is there any other was other than doing a
clean install?


Bill Stanley

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Old 04-30-2012, 06:18 PM
Bill Stanley
 
Default Serious upgrade problem! My computer previously was 64 bit and now is 32 bit.

I have thought about the situation and probably a clean install is best.
As for the upgrade problem, I think that the people at Canonical had
better look into this.


Now the question I pose is this.

My computer has 8 GB of memory (thus needing a 64 bit OS) and has two
hard drives. The original HD is 1 TB and is entirely devoted to Win 7
(I do not want to change this at all). The other is 500 GB and is for
Linux and There is space for 2 additional HDs.


If I entirely erase the Linux HD and do a clean install, what is the
best way to do the partitioning? I have read somewhere that I do not
need a /boot partition. Should I have /boot partition and if so, how
big should it be? How big should the swap partition be? I also have
read that if I have a partition dedicated to /home I would not need to
change it when doing a clean reinstall. Is it advisable to have a
separate /home partition and how big should it be. Of course the rest
of the OS would be on whatever is left over (at /root I believe?) .


Bill Stanley

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