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Old 04-27-2012, 05:04 PM
Kipton Moravec
 
Default PID File

I am installing a program, and it has a PID file in /var/run

Unfortunately the .conf file specifies the file, but it was a manual
install, and it did not create the .pid file. Looking at other pid files
in the same directory it looks like they just have a number.

It also looks like the start/stop for this application in /etc/init.d
uses the pid file to start and stop the process.

How do I find a number to use?

I can look at all of the running processes and they have numbers between
1000 and 2300.

So how do I know if I picked a number it is not being used by a process
that is not currently running?

I can't find a table of "standard" process identification numbers. (Like
the one for TCP or UDP ports).

It looks like the maximum PID is 32767. So do I just go crazy and use
something like 32000? Or are numbers <1000 available for this?

Kip


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Old 04-27-2012, 07:46 PM
Steve Flynn
 
Default PID File

On 27 April 2012 18:04, Kipton Moravec <kip@kdream.com> wrote:
> I am installing a program, and it has a PID file in /var/run
>
> It also looks like the start/stop for this application in /etc/init.d
> uses the pid file to start and stop the process.
>
> How do I find a number to use?

You don't. The pid is a "Process ID" and is generated on the fly by
the kernel. It's not like TCP ports where 'magic' numbers are
allocated and the SMTP is normally found on port 25., for example.

> I can't find a table of "standard" process identification numbers. (Like
> the one for TCP or UDP ports).

Because there isn't one.

> It looks like the maximum PID is 32767. So do I just go crazy and use
> something like 32000? Or are numbers <1000 available for this?

None of this is necessary, and it's impossible for you to specify a
specific pid to use for a process.

--
Steve

When one person suffers from a delusion it is insanity. When many
people suffer from a delusion it is called religion.

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Old 04-27-2012, 08:18 PM
Rashkae
 
Default PID File

On 04/27/2012 03:46 PM, Steve Flynn wrote:

On 27 April 2012 18:04, Kipton Moravec<kip@kdream.com> wrote:

I am installing a program, and it has a PID file in /var/run

It also looks like the start/stop for this application in /etc/init.d
uses the pid file to start and stop the process.

How do I find a number to use?

You don't. The pid is a "Process ID" and is generated on the fly by
the kernel. It's not like TCP ports where 'magic' numbers are
allocated and the SMTP is normally found on port 25., for example.


I can't find a table of "standard" process identification numbers. (Like
the one for TCP or UDP ports).

Because there isn't one.


It looks like the maximum PID is 32767. So do I just go crazy and use
something like 32000? Or are numbers<1000 available for this?

None of this is necessary, and it's impossible for you to specify a
specific pid to use for a process.

To clarify on this a bit. You don't create the PID file when you
install/configure the program. Rather, the script that starts the
program creates/updates the pid file when the program starts.


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Old 04-27-2012, 08:48 PM
Kipton Moravec
 
Default PID File

On Fri, 2012-04-27 at 16:18 -0400, Rashkae wrote:
> On 04/27/2012 03:46 PM, Steve Flynn wrote:
> > On 27 April 2012 18:04, Kipton Moravec<kip@kdream.com> wrote:
> >> I am installing a program, and it has a PID file in /var/run
> >>
> >> It also looks like the start/stop for this application in /etc/init.d
> >> uses the pid file to start and stop the process.
> >>
> >> How do I find a number to use?
> > You don't. The pid is a "Process ID" and is generated on the fly by
> > the kernel. It's not like TCP ports where 'magic' numbers are
> > allocated and the SMTP is normally found on port 25., for example.
> >
> >> I can't find a table of "standard" process identification numbers. (Like
> >> the one for TCP or UDP ports).
> > Because there isn't one.
> >
> >> It looks like the maximum PID is 32767. So do I just go crazy and use
> >> something like 32000? Or are numbers<1000 available for this?
> > None of this is necessary, and it's impossible for you to specify a
> > specific pid to use for a process.
> >
> To clarify on this a bit. You don't create the PID file when you
> install/configure the program. Rather, the script that starts the
> program creates/updates the pid file when the program starts.
>

O.K. but I got an error because it could not find the aprx.pid file.
It did not work until I physically created a aprx.pid file I put the
number 67 in it.

But you are right, I just looked and now it has 2888 in it. So it
updated the number with the new PID when it started.

Thanks,
Kip


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