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Old 03-06-2012, 05:55 PM
Steven Davies-Morris
 
Default RAID Lv 1: Grub fails to install!

On 03/06/2012 08:06 AM, oxy wrote:

Hi all,

the motherboard ASUS P8Z68-V LE offers a RAID option. I setup RAID1
there (2 discs) and installed Ubu 11.10. Went fine till the end, when
Grub failed to install (it was trying on a /dev/sda device,
non-existent because it was inside the RAID). The installer asks for
an alternative installation point and i tell the RAID device that was
given as one of the options. Installation continues (default
partitioning) till the end, I boot the system and ... black screen!

Any help? Thanx in advance! oxy

PS: they are 2 identical SATA discs. The motherboard supports the
"Intel rapid storage technology - option ROM" (??)


I wouldn't use the MOBO fakeraid. I'm not a fan of those setups at all.
But having said that how big are the drives? And are they being created
as MBR or GPT drives? I have given up trying to use anything bigger that
2TB for a boot drive in a RAID1 array. Also I have given up trying to
use GPT for those boot RAID1 arrays, installing those as the old
MSDOS/Intel MBR type, reserving the 3TB drives and GPT for RAID5 and
RAID6 configurations. It's more work to go through doing Linux software
RAID but if you have the processor speed and RAM I think that you'll be
better off in the long run with that approach. Plus if (when) something
happens to this MOBO you won't be wondering what will happen when you
put those drives into another MOBO. The Linux software RAID will migrate
forward without any potential hardware issues.
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Old 03-08-2012, 04:44 PM
"compdoc"
 
Default RAID Lv 1: Grub fails to install!

> Installation continues (default partitioning) till the end, I boot the
system and ... black screen!

Are you saying it begins to boot and ends at a black screen? Do you seeing
any booting progress before the black screen? Please describe...

> no, its not from the video card cause a prev install showed up fine :-)

A previous install of what showed up fine?


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Old 03-09-2012, 04:42 AM
Rigved Rakshit
 
Default RAID Lv 1: Grub fails to install!

Hi,

My friend also has a similar problem. His laptop came with fakeRAID, with the drivers installed in Windows. This fakeRAID setup can be controlled via BIOS. The solution suggested in this thread requires installing Linux using mdadm. But, will that cause a problem with the Windows install? My friend does not want to lose his original Windows install. Is there a way to install Ubuntu to such a system?



Thanks and Regards,
Rigved Rakshit

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Old 03-09-2012, 07:59 AM
Avi Greenbury
 
Default RAID Lv 1: Grub fails to install!

Rigved Rakshit wrote:

> My friend also has a similar problem. His laptop came with fakeRAID,
> with the drivers installed in Windows. This fakeRAID setup can be
> controlled via BIOS. The solution suggested in this thread requires
> installing Linux using mdadm. But, will that cause a problem with the
> Windows install? My friend does not want to lose his original Windows
> install. Is there a way to install Ubuntu to such a system?

Its effect on his Windows install depends upon his Windows set up.
Windows wont be able to use the md raid or the volumes in it (in much
the same way as it can't use the ext volumes created by a normal Linux
install).

In short, if the raid controller isn't supported by Linux there's not a
lot you can do to make it work. You may find that it can be made to
work with a hand-compiled kernel module, but that is a bit more tricky
than simply apt-get installing it, and it's genrally accepted that
filesystem interaction isn't somewhere to experiment.

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Old 03-09-2012, 01:49 PM
Liam Proven
 
Default RAID Lv 1: Grub fails to install!

On 9 March 2012 05:42, Rigved Rakshit <r.phate@gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi,
>
> My friend also has a similar problem. His laptop came with fakeRAID, with
> the drivers installed in Windows. This fakeRAID setup can be controlled via
> BIOS. The solution suggested in this thread requires installing Linux using
> mdadm. But, will that cause a problem with the Windows install? My friend
> does not want to lose his original Windows install. Is there a way to
> install Ubuntu to such a system?

Wrong tool.

`mdadm` is for administering Linux software RAIDs. These are not
compatible with firmware fakeRAID, at all, ever.

There /is/ a Linux tool, `dmraid`, which is used to manipulate
firmware fakeRAIDs. I have not tried it.

I *really* would not recommend it.

FakeRAID is a hack designed to get around manufacturer-imposed
restrictions in Windows and Mac OS X workstation editions. Both these
OSs are perfectly capable of creating, using and managing software
RAID arrays but the vendors block you from doing this because that is
a feature of the expensive server editions.

FakeRAID works by lying to the OS' disk device driver, or by
installing modified disk device drivers. This is not an approach that
plays well with dual-booting. A small change on one side could well
completely erase the arrays of the other OS.

It's there. Use it at your own risk. I use RAID a lot and I would not
touch it myself. You /might/ - I emphasize MIGHT - be able to get a
separate Linux install on an actual disk to mount and read a Windows
fakeRAID array. I suspect that trying to *install* Linux onto such an
array is an exercise that will result in long days of repartitioning,
reformatting, and reinstalling multiple OSs over and over and OVER
again... and that the end result would be about as stable as an
elephant balancing on a traffic cone on one foot.

Since the entire objective of RAID is stability, this seems extremely
self-defeating to me.

Buy more disks, or break the array and use one disk for Windows and
one for Linux.


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Old 03-09-2012, 03:05 PM
Steven Davies-Morris
 
Default RAID Lv 1: Grub fails to install!

On 03/09/2012 06:49 AM, Liam Proven wrote:

On 9 March 2012 05:42, Rigved Rakshit<r.phate@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi,

My friend also has a similar problem. His laptop came with fakeRAID, with
the drivers installed in Windows. This fakeRAID setup can be controlled via
BIOS. The solution suggested in this thread requires installing Linux using
mdadm. But, will that cause a problem with the Windows install? My friend
does not want to lose his original Windows install. Is there a way to
install Ubuntu to such a system?


Wrong tool.

`mdadm` is for administering Linux software RAIDs. These are not
compatible with firmware fakeRAID, at all, ever.

There /is/ a Linux tool, `dmraid`, which is used to manipulate
firmware fakeRAIDs. I have not tried it.

I *really* would not recommend it.

FakeRAID is a hack designed to get around manufacturer-imposed
restrictions in Windows and Mac OS X workstation editions. Both these
OSs are perfectly capable of creating, using and managing software
RAID arrays but the vendors block you from doing this because that is
a feature of the expensive server editions.

FakeRAID works by lying to the OS' disk device driver, or by
installing modified disk device drivers. This is not an approach that
plays well with dual-booting. A small change on one side could well
completely erase the arrays of the other OS.

It's there. Use it at your own risk. I use RAID a lot and I would not
touch it myself. You /might/ - I emphasize MIGHT - be able to get a
separate Linux install on an actual disk to mount and read a Windows
fakeRAID array. I suspect that trying to *install* Linux onto such an
array is an exercise that will result in long days of repartitioning,
reformatting, and reinstalling multiple OSs over and over and OVER
again... and that the end result would be about as stable as an
elephant balancing on a traffic cone on one foot.

Since the entire objective of RAID is stability, this seems extremely
self-defeating to me.

Buy more disks, or break the array and use one disk for Windows and
one for Linux.


+1. That all sounds like excellent adivice to me.
--
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Systems Theory website www.systemstheory.net
"overfulnoisecascade" CD coming soon

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Old 03-11-2012, 09:30 AM
Rigved Rakshit
 
Default RAID Lv 1: Grub fails to install!

> Hi,

>

> My friend also has a similar problem. His laptop came with fakeRAID, with

> the drivers installed in Windows. This fakeRAID setup can be controlled via

> BIOS. The solution suggested in this thread requires installing Linux using

> mdadm. But, will that cause a problem with the Windows install? My friend

> does not want to lose his original Windows install. Is there a way to

> install Ubuntu to such a system?



Wrong tool.



`mdadm` is for administering Linux software RAIDs. These are not

compatible with firmware fakeRAID, at all, ever.



There /is/ a Linux tool, `dmraid`, which is used to manipulate

firmware fakeRAIDs. I have not tried it.

Ok. Got it!
*


I *really* would not recommend it.



FakeRAID is a hack designed to get around manufacturer-imposed

restrictions in Windows and Mac OS X workstation editions. Both these

OSs are perfectly capable of creating, using and managing software

RAID arrays but the vendors block you from doing this because that is

a feature of the expensive server editions.



FakeRAID works by lying to the OS' disk device driver, or by

installing modified disk device drivers. This is not an approach that

plays well with dual-booting. A small change on one side could well

completely erase the arrays of the other OS.



It's there. Use it at your own risk. I use RAID a lot and I would not

touch it myself. You /might/ - I emphasize MIGHT - be able to get a

separate Linux install on an actual disk to mount and read a Windows

fakeRAID array. I suspect that trying to *install* Linux onto such an

array is an exercise that will result in long days of repartitioning,

reformatting, and reinstalling multiple OSs over and over and OVER

again... and that the end result would be about as stable as an

elephant balancing on a traffic cone on one foot.

Thanks for the info!
*




Since the entire objective of RAID is stability, this seems extremely

self-defeating to me.



Buy more disks, or break the array and use one disk for Windows and

one for Linux.

Yes, that would be only solution. Break the RAID array. The advantage this will give is that I will get two hard disks from this. I can have Windows on one (along with it bootloader) and Ubuntu on the other (along with GRUB). This way, removing one disk in the future will not affect the other OS.



I will have to investigate whether this is possible without re-installing Windows. Maybe, I will only need the Windows recovery CD to re-install it's bootloader.

Last solution will be to run Ubuntu in VirtualBox inside Windows.



Best Regards,
Rigved Rakshit

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Old 03-13-2012, 03:30 PM
oxy
 
Default RAID Lv 1: Grub fails to install!

No, I'll run windows inside virtuallbox in ubuntu. The base network
must be linux for me. Thx

On 3/11/12, Rigved Rakshit <r.phate@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> > Hi,
>> >
>> > My friend also has a similar problem. His laptop came with fakeRAID,
>> > with
>> > the drivers installed in Windows. This fakeRAID setup can be controlled
>> via
>> > BIOS. The solution suggested in this thread requires installing Linux
>> using
>> > mdadm. But, will that cause a problem with the Windows install? My
>> > friend
>> > does not want to lose his original Windows install. Is there a way to
>> > install Ubuntu to such a system?
>>
>> Wrong tool.
>>
>> `mdadm` is for administering Linux software RAIDs. These are not
>> compatible with firmware fakeRAID, at all, ever.
>>
>> There /is/ a Linux tool, `dmraid`, which is used to manipulate
>> firmware fakeRAIDs. I have not tried it.
>>
>
> Ok. Got it!
>
>
>>
>> I *really* would not recommend it.
>>
>> FakeRAID is a hack designed to get around manufacturer-imposed
>> restrictions in Windows and Mac OS X workstation editions. Both these
>> OSs are perfectly capable of creating, using and managing software
>> RAID arrays but the vendors block you from doing this because that is
>> a feature of the expensive server editions.
>>
>> FakeRAID works by lying to the OS' disk device driver, or by
>> installing modified disk device drivers. This is not an approach that
>> plays well with dual-booting. A small change on one side could well
>> completely erase the arrays of the other OS.
>>
>> It's there. Use it at your own risk. I use RAID a lot and I would not
>> touch it myself. You /might/ - I emphasize MIGHT - be able to get a
>> separate Linux install on an actual disk to mount and read a Windows
>> fakeRAID array. I suspect that trying to *install* Linux onto such an
>> array is an exercise that will result in long days of repartitioning,
>> reformatting, and reinstalling multiple OSs over and over and OVER
>> again... and that the end result would be about as stable as an
>> elephant balancing on a traffic cone on one foot.
>>
>
> Thanks for the info!
>
>
>>
>> Since the entire objective of RAID is stability, this seems extremely
>> self-defeating to me.
>>
>> Buy more disks, or break the array and use one disk for Windows and
>> one for Linux.
>>
>
> Yes, that would be only solution. Break the RAID array. The advantage this
> will give is that I will get two hard disks from this. I can have Windows
> on one (along with it bootloader) and Ubuntu on the other (along with
> GRUB). This way, removing one disk in the future will not affect the other
> OS.
>
> I will have to investigate whether this is possible without re-installing
> Windows. Maybe, I will only need the Windows recovery CD to re-install it's
> bootloader.
>
> Last solution will be to run Ubuntu in VirtualBox inside Windows.
>
> Best Regards,
> Rigved Rakshit
>

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