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Old 03-02-2012, 04:12 PM
 
Default Installing Ubuntu on a laptop that has Windows 7 and Linux Mint

We currently have a laptop with Windows 7 and Linux Mint 11. We plan
on installing Ubuntu 11.10 and Linux Mint 12. What is the best way of
installing these two linux distros? I'm particularly uncertain of the
best way to answer the partition questions that the installation will
ask.

I booted up the "Ubuntu 11 Iso" on my computer. The installer was
aware that I had "other operating systems". It asked me whether I
wanted to install Ubuntu 11.10 alongside them. I did, and then I was
led to "Guided Installation". I saw this screen:
http://i.imgur.com/pOanH.jpg

But that worried me. Where were was Linux Mint? And why was Ubuntu
going to be installed in sda3? sda3 is Windows Recovery Environment
loader (ntfs), according to the "Manual Partition" option. The screen
does say that "4 smaller partitions are hidden", but that scared me.
So I went and clicked onto Manual Partitioning.

See http://i.imgur.com/lBFsb.jpg

sda1 ntfs 1.6GB Windows 7
sda2 ntfs 209GB Windows 7
sda5 ext4 93.9GB Linux Mint 11 Katya
sda6 swap (linux-swap) 4.1GB
sda3 ntfs 11.1GB Windows Recovery Environment

Some questions:
1. Why is Windows 7 split into sda1 and sda2?
2. Do I need sda6 linux-swap?
3. What's the proper way to make room for Ubuntu? What must I click on
the screen?

Also, I'd like the 2 distros to share the same "home" folder. By this,
I mean that I want both of them to point to the same place for where I
save my stuff (same Downloads folder, same Photos folder, same
"Recent" stuff, etc)

The laptop has only one hard drive.

Any other advice will be appreciated.


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Old 03-02-2012, 04:55 PM
"Pongo A. Pan"
 
Default Installing Ubuntu on a laptop that has Windows 7 and Linux Mint

On Fri, 2012-03-02 at 09:12 -0800, taodoe9.amabel@recursor.net wrote:
> We currently have a laptop with Windows 7 and Linux Mint 11. We plan
> on installing Ubuntu 11.10 and Linux Mint 12. What is the best way of
> installing these two linux distros? I'm particularly uncertain of the
> best way to answer the partition questions that the installation will
> ask.
>
A good place to start learning about this stuff is here:
http://forums.partedmagic.com

PartedMagic is a free utility which bundles lots of useful tools, but
most importantly the gnome partitioner. You use it as a live CD or USB
to pre-partition your hard disk before installing new operating systems.
Highly recommended.

> I booted up the "Ubuntu 11 Iso" on my computer. The installer was
> aware that I had "other operating systems". It asked me whether I
> wanted to install Ubuntu 11.10 alongside them. I did, and then I was
> led to "Guided Installation". I saw this screen:
> http://i.imgur.com/pOanH.jpg
You don't want to do this unless you are willing to trash Mint 11. You
need to use manual partitioning, preferably after you have used Parted
Magic or something similar to make empty partitions on your disk for
everything you want to install.

>
> But that worried me. Where were was Linux Mint? And why was Ubuntu
> going to be installed in sda3? sda3 is Windows Recovery Environment
> loader (ntfs), according to the "Manual Partition" option. The screen
> does say that "4 smaller partitions are hidden", but that scared me.
> So I went and clicked onto Manual Partitioning.
>
> See http://i.imgur.com/lBFsb.jpg
>
> sda1 ntfs 1.6GB Windows 7
> sda2 ntfs 209GB Windows 7
> sda5 ext4 93.9GB Linux Mint 11 Katya
> sda6 swap (linux-swap) 4.1GB
> sda3 ntfs 11.1GB Windows Recovery Environment
>
You have one hard disk which looks as if it is divided into 3 primary
partitions and one extended partition with two logical partitions in it.

> Some questions:
> 1. Why is Windows 7 split into sda1 and sda2?
Sda1 is most likely the recovery image for Win7.

> 2. Do I need sda6 linux-swap?
Only if you want linux to work well. You can share swap partitions
among many distros, so you only need one of these.

> 3. What's the proper way to make room for Ubuntu? What must I click on
> the screen?
>
> Also, I'd like the 2 distros to share the same "home" folder. By this,
> I mean that I want both of them to point to the same place for where I
> save my stuff (same Downloads folder, same Photos folder, same
> "Recent" stuff, etc)
This can be very problematic. If you do this you will have competing
and conflicting configuration files (often in the form of hidden
directories in your home). A better (but somewhat more complicated) way
to do this is to have a small separate home for each distro and a
common /data partition with things like Documents and Pictures linked
with simlinks. You need to learn more about the basics of partitioning
before you try any of this. Please visit the PartedMagic forums as
indicated above.

In the first instance I'd shrink the Win7 sda2 down to 50 GB or so and
expand the extended partition to take up the new space. Then I'd make
two 20 GB or so partitions for the linux systems and use the rest for
the two homes. The swap partition seems about right and can be shared.
Then install the distros. Win7 may have to be booted in recovery mode
the first time after you shrink it. GRUB will handle the booting.

Please back up everything dear to you in multiple places before you do
any of this. It usually works but the one time it will fail is when you
don't have proper (and tested) backups.

Do you have an old computer you can practice and learn on? That would
be the best thing.

--
pongo pan
Fri, 02 Mar 2012 09:53:04 -0800
Epicurus up 21:08, 1 user, load average: 0.11, 0.06, 0.05
Linux 3.2.0-17-generic
Ubuntu precise (development branch), gnome-session 3.2.1, unity 5.4.0



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Old 03-02-2012, 06:14 PM
 
Default Installing Ubuntu on a laptop that has Windows 7 and Linux Mint

Thanks for the reply.

On Fri, Mar 2, 2012 at 9:55 AM, Pongo wrote:

> PartedMagic is a free utility which bundles lots of useful tools, but
> most importantly the gnome partitioner. *You use it as a live CD or USB
> to pre-partition your hard disk before installing new operating systems.
> Highly recommended.

Can't the Ubuntu installer create new partitions and resize existing ones?


>
>> I booted up the "Ubuntu 11 Iso" on my computer. The installer was
>> aware that I had "other operating systems". It asked me whether I
>> wanted to install Ubuntu 11.10 alongside them. I did, and then I was
>> led to "Guided Installation". I saw this screen:
>> http://i.imgur.com/pOanH.jpg
> You don't want to do this unless you are willing to trash Mint 11. *You
> need to use manual partitioning, preferably after you have used Parted
> Magic or something similar to make empty partitions on your disk for
> everything you want to install.
Oh, so you mean that even if the Ubuntu installed said that I had
"operating systems" (plural), it was only going to keep one of them
(Win7)? Hmmm.... if that's the case, I think the Ubuntu staff should
make this clear.

>>
>>
>> sda1 ntfs 1.6GB Windows 7
>> sda2 ntfs 209GB Windows 7
>> sda5 ext4 93.9GB Linux Mint 11 Katya
>> sda6 swap (linux-swap) 4.1GB
>> sda3 ntfs 11.1GB Windows Recovery Environment
>>
> You have one hard disk which looks as if it is divided into 3 primary
> partitions and one extended partition with two logical partitions in it.
>
>> Some questions:
>> 1. Why is Windows 7 split into sda1 and sda2?
> Sda1 is most likely the recovery image for Win7.
Is there a difference between "recovery image" (what you say sda1 is)
and "Windows Recovery Environment" (sda3's label)?

Thanks!


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Old 03-02-2012, 07:02 PM
"Pongo A. Pan"
 
Default Installing Ubuntu on a laptop that has Windows 7 and Linux Mint

On Fri, 2012-03-02 at 11:14 -0800, taodoe9.amabel@recursor.net wrote:
> Thanks for the reply.
>
> On Fri, Mar 2, 2012 at 9:55 AM, Pongo wrote:
>
> > PartedMagic is a free utility which bundles lots of useful tools, but
> > most importantly the gnome partitioner. You use it as a live CD or USB
> > to pre-partition your hard disk before installing new operating systems.
> > Highly recommended.
>
> Can't the Ubuntu installer create new partitions and resize existing ones?
>
Certainly, in fact it uses a version of gparted, but a purpose-built
partitioner is more powerful and (IMHO) less confusing.

Parted Magic also comes with tools for backup, disk testing and lots
more that you don't get with distro installers. (I have no connection
with them except as a very satisfied user.) Anyhow, their forums are
very informative and a good place to learn about these issues. All free
and open, of course.




--
pongo pan
Fri, 02 Mar 2012 12:02:22 -0800
Epicurus up 23:17, 0 users, load average: 0.15, 0.12, 0.08
Linux 3.2.0-17-generic
Ubuntu precise (development branch), gnome-session 3.2.1, unity 5.4.0



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Old 03-02-2012, 08:08 PM
 
Default Installing Ubuntu on a laptop that has Windows 7 and Linux Mint

On Fri, Mar 2, 2012 at 9:55 AM, Pongo wrote:
>> 3. What's the proper way to make room for Ubuntu? What must I click on
>> the screen?
>>
>> Also, I'd like the 2 distros to share the same "home" folder. By this,
>> I mean that I want both of them to point to the same place for where I
>> save my stuff (same Downloads folder, same Photos folder, same
>> "Recent" stuff, etc)
> This can be very problematic. *If you do this you will have competing
> and conflicting configuration files (often in the form of hidden
> directories in your home). *A better (but somewhat more complicated) way
> to do this is to have a small separate home for each distro and a
> common /data partition with things like Documents and Pictures linked
> with simlinks. *You need to learn more about the basics of partitioning
> before you try any of this. *Please visit the PartedMagic forums as
> indicated above.
>
> In the first instance I'd shrink the Win7 sda2 down to 50 GB or so and
> expand the extended partition to take up the new space. *Then I'd make
> two 20 GB or so partitions for the linux systems and use the rest for
> the two homes. *The swap partition seems about right and can be shared.
> Then install the distros. *Win7 may have to be booted in recovery mode
> the first time after you shrink it. *GRUB will handle the booting.


Thanks again. Ok. I won't bother with having the 2 linux distros
sharing the same home folder. I'll go with your suggestion of having a
common "/data" partition/folder

I'm trying to implement your advice to shrink Win7 sda2 down to 50 GB.
I'm trying to do the shrinking within Win7, using Win7's own Disk
Management. Please see http://i.imgur.com/wCcUe.png
Which is sda2 in this pic?




>> 1. Why is Windows 7 split into sda1 and sda2?
> Sda1 is most likely the recovery image for Win7.
Is there a difference between "recovery image" (what you say sda1 is)
and "Windows Recovery Environment" (sda3's label)?


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Old 03-02-2012, 08:28 PM
Parko
 
Default Installing Ubuntu on a laptop that has Windows 7 and Linux Mint

On Fri, 02 Mar 2012 13:08:08 -0800, taodoe9.amabel wrote:

> Is there a difference between "recovery image" (what you say sda1 is)
> and "Windows Recovery Environment" (sda3's label)?

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd744388%28v=ws.10%29.aspx



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Old 03-02-2012, 08:43 PM
"Pongo A. Pan"
 
Default Installing Ubuntu on a laptop that has Windows 7 and Linux Mint

On Fri, 2012-03-02 at 13:08 -0800, taodoe9.amabel@recursor.net wrote:
> On Fri, Mar 2, 2012 at 9:55 AM, Pongo wrote:
> >> 3. What's the proper way to make room for Ubuntu? What must I click on
> >> the screen?
> >>
> >> Also, I'd like the 2 distros to share the same "home" folder. By this,
> >> I mean that I want both of them to point to the same place for where I
> >> save my stuff (same Downloads folder, same Photos folder, same
> >> "Recent" stuff, etc)
> > This can be very problematic. If you do this you will have competing
> > and conflicting configuration files (often in the form of hidden
> > directories in your home). A better (but somewhat more complicated) way
> > to do this is to have a small separate home for each distro and a
> > common /data partition with things like Documents and Pictures linked
> > with simlinks. You need to learn more about the basics of partitioning
> > before you try any of this. Please visit the PartedMagic forums as
> > indicated above.
> >
> > In the first instance I'd shrink the Win7 sda2 down to 50 GB or so and
> > expand the extended partition to take up the new space. Then I'd make
> > two 20 GB or so partitions for the linux systems and use the rest for
> > the two homes. The swap partition seems about right and can be shared.
> > Then install the distros. Win7 may have to be booted in recovery mode
> > the first time after you shrink it. GRUB will handle the booting.
>
>
> Thanks again. Ok. I won't bother with having the 2 linux distros
> sharing the same home folder. I'll go with your suggestion of having a
> common "/data" partition/folder
>
> I'm trying to implement your advice to shrink Win7 sda2 down to 50 GB.
> I'm trying to do the shrinking within Win7, using Win7's own Disk
> Management. Please see http://i.imgur.com/wCcUe.png
> Which is sda2 in this pic?
>
Well, to start with Win7 apparently thinks you have 5 primary partitions.
This is impossible with Microsoft's very lame partitioning scheme, so
the first one on this display must be hidden. It is almost certainly
the recovery partition. The one Windows calls C is sda2. That's the
one you want to shrink. The one to the right of this is your Mint 11
install with home and system in the same partition (not usually
recommended). The one to the right of that is linux-swap and the last
one looks like workspace for the Windows re-installer or utilities for
Windows recovery. The restore image is most certainly the left-most
(and presumably hidden) partition (which linux utilities will call
sda1).

I really think you'd be better off to download Parted Magic, burn a CD
and not try to do this from Windows. Parted Magic can shrink Windows
better than Windows can and even if it all goes bad you can restore to
factory with the restore partition (and your backed-up data, and the
instructions which came with the laptop). Then, nuke the present linux
primary partitions (sda5 and sda6), make an extended partition and
create virtual partitions for your linux installs there. This is easier
to see with the full-fledged version of Gnome gparted that you get with
Parted Magic (or SystemRescueCD or several others) than it is from the
very lame partitioner in Windows or the cut down versions in installers,
if only because you can full-screen it.
>
>
> >> 1. Why is Windows 7 split into sda1 and sda2?
> > Sda1 is most likely the recovery image for Win7.
> Is there a difference between "recovery image" (what you say sda1 is)
> and "Windows Recovery Environment" (sda3's label)?
>
Explained (well, guessed at) above.

Please use a real tool to do this: not Windows, not the cut-down
versions of gparted in the installers. And only after you've educated
yourself on this topic, backed up everything three times and thought
about it carefully.


--
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Fri, 02 Mar 2012 13:42:30 -0800
Epicurus up 1:37, 1 user, load average: 0.00, 0.04, 0.05
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Old 03-03-2012, 05:21 AM
"Samsul Ma'arif"
 
Default Installing Ubuntu on a laptop that has Windows 7 and Linux Mint

> >> Also, I'd like the 2 distros to share the same "home" folder. By this,



> >> I mean that I want both of them to point to the same place for where I

> >> save my stuff (same Downloads folder, same Photos folder, same

> >> "Recent" stuff, etc)

As i know, you can use one partition as one shared home directory,
but you have to make thus 2 distro using different username.
It's avoid conflicting configuration file between two of them.
I'm afraid you can not point to the same place where you save your stuff.
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Old 03-06-2012, 06:05 PM
Liam Proven
 
Default Installing Ubuntu on a laptop that has Windows 7 and Linux Mint

On 2 March 2012 17:12, <taodoe9.amabel@recursor.net> wrote:
> We currently have a laptop with Windows 7 and Linux Mint 11. We plan
> on installing Ubuntu 11.10 and Linux Mint 12. What is the best way of
> installing these two linux distros? I'm particularly uncertain of the
> best way to answer the partition questions that the installation will
> ask.
>
> I booted up the "Ubuntu 11 Iso" on my computer. The installer was
> aware that I had "other operating systems". It asked me whether I
> wanted to install Ubuntu 11.10 alongside them. I did, and then I was
> led to "Guided Installation". I saw this screen:
> http://i.imgur.com/pOanH.jpg
>
> But that worried me. Where were was Linux Mint? And why was Ubuntu
> going to be installed in sda3? sda3 is Windows Recovery Environment
> loader (ntfs), according to the "Manual Partition" option. The screen
> does say that "4 smaller partitions are hidden", but that scared me.
> So I went and clicked onto Manual Partitioning.
>
> See http://i.imgur.com/lBFsb.jpg
>
> sda1 ntfs 1.6GB Windows 7
> sda2 ntfs 209GB Windows 7
> sda5 ext4 93.9GB Linux Mint 11 Katya
> sda6 swap (linux-swap) 4.1GB
> sda3 ntfs 11.1GB Windows Recovery Environment
>
> Some questions:
> 1. Why is Windows 7 split into sda1 and sda2?

Don't know. Best leave it well alone! Otherwise you risk damaging Windows.

> 2. Do I need sda6 linux-swap?

Yes. Leave it. It is safe to share this between 2 different distros.

> 3. What's the proper way to make room for Ubuntu? What must I click on
> the screen?

Shrink the Mint partition. Put the Ubuntu partition after that.

> Also, I'd like the 2 distros to share the same "home" folder. By this,
> I mean that I want both of them to point to the same place for where I
> save my stuff (same Downloads folder, same Photos folder, same
> "Recent" stuff, etc)

You can't. It's too late. You don't have a separate /home partition
which is what you need to do this.

If you want that, then here is what to do, as a minimum:

[1] Back up all your data
[2] Make a 2nd backup of all your data in Mint as it will be lost
[3] Remove the Mint root partition; leave the Windows and swap partitions
[4] Use the space to make 3 new partitions:
- [a] 16GB for Mint root
- [b] 16GB for Ubuntu root
- [c] the rest of the space for /home

Reinstall Mint using the separate /home partition.
Install Ubuntu using the same /home partition.

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Old 03-06-2012, 06:07 PM
Liam Proven
 
Default Installing Ubuntu on a laptop that has Windows 7 and Linux Mint

On 2 March 2012 17:55, Pongo A. Pan <pongo_pan@fastmail.us> wrote:

> This can be very problematic. *If you do this you will have competing
> and conflicting configuration files (often in the form of hidden
> directories in your home). *A better (but somewhat more complicated) way
> to do this is to have a small separate home for each distro and a
> common /data partition with things like Documents and Pictures linked
> with simlinks.

I personally would disagree, but it is one way of doing it, true.

Me, I would probably have a separate *FAT32* partition, allowing one
to readily share data between Windows as well as multiple Linux
installations. However, I don't symlink folders into there - that
strikes me as hazardous.

> *You need to learn more about the basics of partitioning
> before you try any of this.

Concur.
> In the first instance I'd shrink the Win7 sda2 down to 50 GB or so and
> expand the extended partition to take up the new space. *Then I'd make
> two 20 GB or so partitions for the linux systems and use the rest for
> the two homes.

There is no need for 2 /home partitions so long as different usernames are used.

> *The swap partition seems about right and can be shared.
> Then install the distros. *Win7 may have to be booted in recovery mode
> the first time after you shrink it. *GRUB will handle the booting.
>
> Please back up everything dear to you in multiple places before you do
> any of this. *It usually works but the one time it will fail is when you
> don't have proper (and tested) backups.
>
> Do you have an old computer you can practice and learn on? *That would
> be the best thing.

Agreed with all this.

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