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"J & K Spaulding" 04-03-2008 03:21 AM

Second of several questions
 
Have a look at samba. I can't test to see if you can share a mounted ntfs
file system but you should be able to.

There are also a number of gui front ends to samba that you can use.

Hope this helps.

John.

-----Original Message-----
From: ubuntu-users-bounces@lists.ubuntu.com
[mailto:ubuntu-users-bounces@lists.ubuntu.com] On Behalf Of Ted Hilts
Sent: Thursday, 3 April 2008 11:13 AM
To: ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Cc: thilts@mcsnet.ca
Subject: [ubuntu-users] Second of several questions

In order to try ubuntu I set up a dual boot with Ubuntu and XP. Soon
after, I was using Ubuntu with special downloads and Firefox add-ons
for most of my more important tasks. Before I installed Ubuntu on an 80
Gig partition I had been using the XP machine's hard drives (C
drv,DVDrw, and 6 hard drives in a SCSI configuration) to store
backup's. I still want to do this backup function using some of the
hard drives but under Ubuntu not under XP. I also want to keep the dual
boot arrangement for the time being.

My problem is the ntfs hard drives. Anything I store on them under
Ubuntu operations looks like:
-rwxrwx--- 2 root plugdev 371386 2006-07-08 22:18 xinha-latest.zip

This is okay for local machine disk operations but other XP machines
cannot do write and execute access to these ntfs hard drives operating
under Ubuntu. These hard drives need to be set up as shares. When using
XP OS they are declared as shares but when using Ubuntu OS they cannot
be declared as shares -- or so it seems to me. So in order to do this it
seems I have to reformat any ntfs hard drives in a Linux format (or
fat32) in order to use them as "shares" under Ubuntu operation. I have
with other Linux systems stored XP and other Windows backups. I cannot
be sure that this was done without some hidden problems

My question is based on the above. What is the best Linux file system
which would support the storing both Linux and Windows(95,98,XP)
backups??? And....is there any real problem in moving files back and
forth from one file system to a different file system as I am planning
to do??? Have I missed something important???

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks, Ted



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"Jon Grant" 04-03-2008 11:26 AM

Second of several questions
 
Please post a better subject, "Second of several questions" means
nothing, and when I am browsing will just mean it gets deleted with
the body of the email never even being looked at.

http://jguk.org/2007/02/email-101-rules-for-great-unwashed.html

Please take this as constructive feedback.

Kind regards
Jon

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"Owen Townend" 04-03-2008 12:50 PM

Second of several questions
 
On 03/04/2008, Ted Hilts <thilts@mcsnet.ca> wrote:
In order to try ubuntu I set up a dual boot with Ubuntu and XP.**Soon
after, I was using Ubuntu**with special downloads and Firefox add-ons
for most of my more important tasks. Before I installed Ubuntu on an 80

Gig partition I had been using the XP machine's hard drives (C
drv,DVDrw, and 6 hard drives in a SCSI configuration) to store
backup's.**I still want to do this backup function using some of the
hard drives but under Ubuntu not under XP.**I also want to keep the dual

boot arrangement for the time being.

My problem is the ntfs hard drives.**Anything I store on them under
Ubuntu operations looks like:
-rwxrwx--- 2 root plugdev** 371386 2006-07-08 22:18 xinha-latest.zip


This is okay for local machine disk operations but other XP machines
cannot do write and execute access to these ntfs hard drives operating
under Ubuntu.**These hard drives need to be set up as shares. When using

XP OS they are declared as shares but when using Ubuntu OS they cannot
be declared as shares -- or so it seems to me. So in order to do this it
seems I have to reformat any ntfs hard drives in a Linux format (or

fat32) in order to use them as "shares" under Ubuntu operation.**I have
with other Linux systems stored XP and other Windows backups. I cannot
be sure that this was done without some hidden problems


My question is based on the above.**What is the best Linux file system
which would support the storing both Linux and Windows(95,98,XP)
backups???**And....is there any real problem in moving files back and

forth from one file system to a different file system as I am planning
to do??? Have I missed something important???

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks, Ted




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Hey,
**ext3 is a good sound choice, and for dual boot there are windows drivers available[1] which I have had success with.

cheers,
Owen.

[1] http://www.fs-driver.org/

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David Vincent 04-03-2008 03:01 PM

Second of several questions
 
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

> On Thu, Apr 3, 2008 at 6:12 AM, Ted Hilts <thilts@mcsnet.ca
> <mailto:thilts@mcsnet.ca>> wrote:
> My question is based on the above. What is the best Linux file system
> which would support the storing both Linux and Windows(95,98,XP)
> backups??? And....is there any real problem in moving files back and
> forth from one file system to a different file system as I am planning
> to do??? Have I missed something important???

> Mehmet Sümengen wrote:
>> I would suggest FAT32. Because you cannot see hard drives formatted in
>> Ext3 etc. under XP OS
>> Other people correct me please if I'm wrong.

That's what I resorted to to keep things simple. Remember FAT32 does
not journal so it is more vulnerable to power outages etc. Also
remember FAT32 has a 4gb file size limit so you can't keep anything
larger on there without breaking it up somehow.

- -d


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Ted Hilts 04-03-2008 06:01 PM

Second of several questions
 
J & K Spaulding

Thank you for your suggestion but I think you have missed an important
point. First, I employ SAMBA (both client and server) on my LAN where
ever I can. No, I cannot use SAMBA for this problem because there is no
way of declaring these ntfs hard drives as shares operating under
Ubuntu. If there is a way of so declaring these ntfs drives as SAMBA
shares operating under Ubuntu then "great" but I don't think that is the
case.

Remember, as I earlier stated, these ntfs drives are automatically set
up by Ubuntu as:

"

My problem is the ntfs hard drives. Anything I store on them under
Ubuntu operations looks like:
-rwxrwx--- 2 root plugdev 371386 2006-07-08 22:18 xinha-latest.zip

"
When I do the mount command this is what I get:

/dev/sde1 on /media/sde1 type fuseblk
(rw,nosuid,nodev,noatime,allow_other,default_permi ssions,blksize=4096)

So, you see that it seems to me there is no way of declaring these ntfs
hard drives (operating under Ubuntu) as SAMBA shares so they could be
accessible to another Windows (XP, etc.) machine. The problem is not
accessing these ntfs drives on the local machine (in this case the dual
boot XP-Ubuntu machine. The problem is other Windows (XP, etc.) machines
accessing these ntfs drives. Other Windows machines seem unable to write
and execute even though the permissions allow this. I think the reason
is that MS Windows OS can't handle these permissions and ownership
classifications and I cannot alter them because they are inherent in the
way Ubuntu deals with ntfs drives.

If I am wrong then give me the SAMBA syntax command line that will allow
operation of these ntfs drives as SAMBA shares operating under Ubuntu
and accessible by means of write and execute modes by the other Windows
machines on the LAN.

Hope you or someone else has a solution. Otherwise, I think I will
reformat these ntfs hard drives to Linux ext3 format and then declare
them as shares served by the Ubuntu SAMBA SERVER and therefore available
to LAN Windows machines (share clients) as SAMBA MOUNTS generated by the
Ubuntu SAMBA server.

Thanks, Ted


J & K Spaulding wrote:
> Have a look at samba. I can't test to see if you can share a mounted ntfs
> file system but you should be able to.
>
> There are also a number of gui front ends to samba that you can use.
>
> Hope this helps.
>
> John.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: ubuntu-users-bounces@lists.ubuntu.com
> [mailto:ubuntu-users-bounces@lists.ubuntu.com] On Behalf Of Ted Hilts
> Sent: Thursday, 3 April 2008 11:13 AM
> To: ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
> Cc: thilts@mcsnet.ca
> Subject: [ubuntu-users] Second of several questions
>
> In order to try ubuntu I set up a dual boot with Ubuntu and XP. Soon
> after, I was using Ubuntu with special downloads and Firefox add-ons
> for most of my more important tasks. Before I installed Ubuntu on an 80
> Gig partition I had been using the XP machine's hard drives (C
> drv,DVDrw, and 6 hard drives in a SCSI configuration) to store
> backup's. I still want to do this backup function using some of the
> hard drives but under Ubuntu not under XP. I also want to keep the dual
> boot arrangement for the time being.
>
> My problem is the ntfs hard drives. Anything I store on them under
> Ubuntu operations looks like:
> -rwxrwx--- 2 root plugdev 371386 2006-07-08 22:18 xinha-latest.zip
>
> This is okay for local machine disk operations but other XP machines
> cannot do write and execute access to these ntfs hard drives operating
> under Ubuntu. These hard drives need to be set up as shares. When using
> XP OS they are declared as shares but when using Ubuntu OS they cannot
> be declared as shares -- or so it seems to me. So in order to do this it
> seems I have to reformat any ntfs hard drives in a Linux format (or
> fat32) in order to use them as "shares" under Ubuntu operation. I have
> with other Linux systems stored XP and other Windows backups. I cannot
> be sure that this was done without some hidden problems
>
> My question is based on the above. What is the best Linux file system
> which would support the storing both Linux and Windows(95,98,XP)
> backups??? And....is there any real problem in moving files back and
> forth from one file system to a different file system as I am planning
> to do??? Have I missed something important???
>
> Any help would be appreciated.
>
> Thanks, Ted
>
>
>
>
J & K Spaulding

Thank you for your suggestion but I think you have missed an important
point. First, I employ SAMBA (both client and server) on my LAN where
ever I can. No, I cannot use SAMBA for this problem because there is no
way of declaring these ntfs hard drives as shares operating under
Ubuntu. If there is a way of so declaring these ntfs drives as SAMBA
shares operating under Ubuntu then "great" but I don't think that is the
case.

Remember, as I earlier stated, these ntfs drives are automatically set
up by Ubuntu as:

"

My problem is the ntfs hard drives. Anything I store on them under
Ubuntu operations looks like:
-rwxrwx--- 2 root plugdev 371386 2006-07-08 22:18 xinha-latest.zip

"
When I do the mount command this is what I get:

/dev/sde1 on /media/sde1 type fuseblk
(rw,nosuid,nodev,noatime,allow_other,default_permi ssions,blksize=4096)

So, you see that it seems to me there is no way of declaring these ntfs
hard drives (operating under Ubuntu) as SAMBA shares so they could be
accessible to another Windows (XP, etc.) machine. The problem is not
accessing these ntfs drives on the local machine (in this case the dual
boot XP-Ubuntu machine. The problem is other Windows (XP, etc.) machines
accessing these ntfs drives. Other Windows machines seem unable to write
and execute even though the permissions allow this. I think the reason
is that MS Windows OS can't handle these permissions and ownership
classifications and I cannot alter them because they are inherent in the
way Ubuntu deals with ntfs drives.

If I am wrong then give me the SAMBA syntax command line that will allow
operation of these ntfs drives as SAMBA shares operating under Ubuntu
and accessible by means of write and execute modes by the other Windows
machines on the LAN.

Hope you or someone else has a solution. Otherwise, I think I will
reformat these ntfs hard drives to Linux ext3 format and then declare
them as shares served by the Ubuntu SAMBA SERVER and therefore available
to LAN Windows machines (share clients) as SAMBA MOUNTS generated by the
Ubuntu SAMBA server.

Thanks, Ted


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Rich Rudnick 04-03-2008 08:52 PM

Second of several questions
 
Ted Hilts wrote:

>
> My problem is the ntfs hard drives. Anything I store on them under
> Ubuntu operations looks like:
> -rwxrwx--- 2 root plugdev 371386 2006-07-08 22:18 xinha-latest.zip
>
> "
> When I do the mount command this is what I get:
>
> /dev/sde1 on /media/sde1 type fuseblk
> (rw,nosuid,nodev,noatime,allow_other,default_permi ssions,blksize=4096)
>

If it's true that the way the ntfs partition mounting is the issue, then
you should change the mounting options.

For example, you could put the following in /etc/fstab

/dev/sde1 /media/sde1 defaults,gid=ted,uid=ted,umask=007 0 1

and then ted would be the owner. It would be

-rwxrwx--- 2 ted ted 371386 2006-07-08 22:18 xinha-latest.zip

and you could share them as the ted user.

Alternatively, you could simply change the umask, giving all
read/write/execute rights:

/dev/sde1 /media/sde1 defaults,gid=046,umask=000 0 1

and then it would be read/writeable by any user.

-rwxrwxrwx 2 root plugdev 371386 2006-07-08 22:18 xinha-latest.zip

I hope this helps

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Ted Hilts 04-03-2008 10:19 PM

Second of several questions
 
Rich Rudnick
Did not work, in fact nothing changed. The same user and permission
settings remain and were not altered in any way by putting the changes
you suggested into /etc/fstab. At least there was no change in the mount
command based on the changes you suggested in the /etc/fstab file.

I used "sudo gedit /etc/fstab" to make the changes.
I used the mount command to examine the outcome.
I used "sudo gedit /etc/fstab" to return the original settings.

Thanks -- Ted


Rich Rudnick wrote:
> Ted Hilts wrote:
>
>
>> My problem is the ntfs hard drives. Anything I store on them under
>> Ubuntu operations looks like:
>> -rwxrwx--- 2 root plugdev 371386 2006-07-08 22:18 xinha-latest.zip
>>
>> "
>> When I do the mount command this is what I get:
>>
>> /dev/sde1 on /media/sde1 type fuseblk
>> (rw,nosuid,nodev,noatime,allow_other,default_permi ssions,blksize=4096)
>>
>>
>
> If it's true that the way the ntfs partition mounting is the issue, then
> you should change the mounting options.
>
> For example, you could put the following in /etc/fstab
>
> /dev/sde1 /media/sde1 defaults,gid=ted,uid=ted,umask=007 0 1
>
> and then ted would be the owner. It would be
>
> -rwxrwx--- 2 ted ted 371386 2006-07-08 22:18 xinha-latest.zip
>
> and you could share them as the ted user.
>
> Alternatively, you could simply change the umask, giving all
> read/write/execute rights:
>
> /dev/sde1 /media/sde1 defaults,gid=046,umask=000 0 1
>
> and then it would be read/writeable by any user.
>
> -rwxrwxrwx 2 root plugdev 371386 2006-07-08 22:18 xinha-latest.zip
>
> I hope this helps
>
>
Rich Rudnick
Did not work, in fact nothing changed. The same user and permission
settings remain and were not altered in any way by putting the changes
you suggested into /etc/fstab. At least there was no change in the mount
command based on the changes you suggested in the /etc/fstab file.

I used "sudo gedit /etc/fstab" to make the changes.
I used the mount command to examine the outcome.
I used "sudo gedit /etc/fstab" to return the original settings.

Thanks -- Ted


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Rich Rudnick 04-03-2008 10:33 PM

Second of several questions
 
Ted Hilts wrote:
> Rich Rudnick wrote:
>> Ted Hilts wrote:
>>
>>
>>> My problem is the ntfs hard drives. Anything I store on them under
>>> Ubuntu operations looks like:
>>> -rwxrwx--- 2 root plugdev 371386 2006-07-08 22:18 xinha-latest.zip
>>>
>>> "
>>> When I do the mount command this is what I get:
>>>
>>> /dev/sde1 on /media/sde1 type fuseblk
>>> (rw,nosuid,nodev,noatime,allow_other,default_permi ssions,blksize=4096)
>>>
>>>
>> If it's true that the way the ntfs partition mounting is the issue, then
>> you should change the mounting options.
>>
>> For example, you could put the following in /etc/fstab
>>
>> /dev/sde1 /media/sde1 defaults,gid=ted,uid=ted,umask=007 0 1
>>
>> and then ted would be the owner. It would be
>>
>> -rwxrwx--- 2 ted ted 371386 2006-07-08 22:18 xinha-latest.zip
>>
>> and you could share them as the ted user.
>>
>> Alternatively, you could simply change the umask, giving all
>> read/write/execute rights:
>>
>> /dev/sde1 /media/sde1 defaults,gid=046,umask=000 0 1
>>
>> and then it would be read/writeable by any user.
>>
>> -rwxrwxrwx 2 root plugdev 371386 2006-07-08 22:18 xinha-latest.zip
>>
>> I hope this helps
>>
>>
> Rich Rudnick
> Did not work, in fact nothing changed. The same user and permission
> settings remain and were not altered in any way by putting the changes
> you suggested into /etc/fstab. At least there was no change in the mount
> command based on the changes you suggested in the /etc/fstab file.
>
> I used "sudo gedit /etc/fstab" to make the changes.
> I used the mount command to examine the outcome.
> I used "sudo gedit /etc/fstab" to return the original settings.
>

Ted,

What mount command did you use? You should only have had to say

sudo mount /media/sde1

since the options for the mount command would be found in the altered fstab.

Rich

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Ted Hilts 04-03-2008 10:55 PM

Second of several questions
 
Rich

I used "mount" all by itself to see and compare each line.
I also used "ls -l /media/sde1/".

I did not attempt any mounting actions on the physical disks.
I assumed the contents of /etc/fstab would immediately make the updates
(you suggested) as a result of the single "mount" and the "ls" command.
So I did not shutdown and power back up. BTW, a week or so ago I had
tried altering the user and permissions on the files themselves using
chmod and chown and these changes also did not take. In all cases I used
"sudo" and then the commands.

Thanks -- Ted


Rich Rudnick wrote:
> Ted Hilts wrote:
>
>> Rich Rudnick wrote:
>>
>>> Ted Hilts wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>> My problem is the ntfs hard drives. Anything I store on them under
>>>> Ubuntu operations looks like:
>>>> -rwxrwx--- 2 root plugdev 371386 2006-07-08 22:18 xinha-latest.zip
>>>>
>>>> "
>>>> When I do the mount command this is what I get:
>>>>
>>>> /dev/sde1 on /media/sde1 type fuseblk
>>>> (rw,nosuid,nodev,noatime,allow_other,default_permi ssions,blksize=4096)
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>> If it's true that the way the ntfs partition mounting is the issue, then
>>> you should change the mounting options.
>>>
>>> For example, you could put the following in /etc/fstab
>>>
>>> /dev/sde1 /media/sde1 defaults,gid=ted,uid=ted,umask=007 0 1
>>>
>>> and then ted would be the owner. It would be
>>>
>>> -rwxrwx--- 2 ted ted 371386 2006-07-08 22:18 xinha-latest.zip
>>>
>>> and you could share them as the ted user.
>>>
>>> Alternatively, you could simply change the umask, giving all
>>> read/write/execute rights:
>>>
>>> /dev/sde1 /media/sde1 defaults,gid=046,umask=000 0 1
>>>
>>> and then it would be read/writeable by any user.
>>>
>>> -rwxrwxrwx 2 root plugdev 371386 2006-07-08 22:18 xinha-latest.zip
>>>
>>> I hope this helps
>>>
>>>
>>>
>> Rich Rudnick
>> Did not work, in fact nothing changed. The same user and permission
>> settings remain and were not altered in any way by putting the changes
>> you suggested into /etc/fstab. At least there was no change in the mount
>> command based on the changes you suggested in the /etc/fstab file.
>>
>> I used "sudo gedit /etc/fstab" to make the changes.
>> I used the mount command to examine the outcome.
>> I used "sudo gedit /etc/fstab" to return the original settings.
>>
>>
>
> Ted,
>
> What mount command did you use? You should only have had to say
>
> sudo mount /media/sde1
>
> since the options for the mount command would be found in the altered fstab.
>
> Rich
>
>
Rich

I used "mount" all by itself to see and compare each line.
I also used "ls -l /media/sde1/".

I did not attempt any mounting actions on the physical disks.
I assumed the contents of /etc/fstab would immediately make the updates
(you suggested) as a result of the single "mount" and the "ls" command.
So I did not shutdown and power back up. BTW, a week or so ago I had
tried altering the user and permissions on the files themselves using
chmod and chown and these changes also did not take. In all cases I used
"sudo" and then the commands.

Thanks -- Ted


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Rich Rudnick 04-03-2008 11:04 PM

Second of several questions
 
Ted Hilts wrote:
> Rich Rudnick wrote:
>
> I used "mount" all by itself to see and compare each line.
> I also used "ls -l /media/sde1/".
>
> I did not attempt any mounting actions on the physical disks.
> I assumed the contents of /etc/fstab would immediately make the updates
> (you suggested) as a result of the single "mount" and the "ls" command.
> So I did not shutdown and power back up. BTW, a week or so ago I had
> tried altering the user and permissions on the files themselves using
> chmod and chown and these changes also did not take. In all cases I used
> "sudo" and then the commands.
>

simply typing mount will only show the current mounting situation, not
affect how things are mounted. ' mount -a ' will cause the /etc/fstab
to be read, and mount any unmounted devices.

For kicks, just to see how it will affect you:

sudo umount /dev/sde1
sudo mount -o defaults,uid=ted,gid=ted,umask=007 /dev/sde1 /media/sde1

If this works, then make the changes to /etc/fstab to make them permanent.

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