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Old 04-03-2008, 07:53 AM
Neil
 
Default video card

On Tue, Apr 1, 2008 at 10:00 AM, Art Baur <chivo@myclearwave.net> wrote:
>
>
> My desk top has a Nvidia Vanta/ Vanta card and I want to switch it over to
> something better and Ubuntu friendly(still running XP). I want a better
> image and something were I don't have to bash my brains out to install. My
> lap top took me 4 day to resolve. Okay I'm sloooooow. Last question I'm also
> installing a new 300 gig Harddrive will ubuntu recognize all the gig? Comp
> is a Compaq and for my motherboard have no idea. Pentium 3 at 1600. All
> ideas welcome.
> --
> ubuntu-users mailing list
> ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
> Modify settings or unsubscribe at:
> https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
>
>

All but maybe the newest Nvidea or Radeon cards are supported. Nvidea
and Radeon offer proprietary drivers on their sites (download section,
choose card, choose Linux I believe), but you shouldn't need them.

Did you try to install Ubuntu on the laptop (I'll assume that)?
What took so long?
- The graphics card (symptoms: only low resolutions allowed or
crashing at the first signs of something else as the text)?
- The lack of cdrom drive (some old laptops have that problem)?
- To little memory (the normal installer seems to demand 300 megs)?

What kind of laptop is it? What is in it (CPU, graphics card, motherboard ) ?
Answers to these questions would help in defining where the problems
of your laptop install is, and therefore whether you might encounter
them on the upgrading of your desktop PC.

The hard drive question: The hard drive will be recognised. It will be
possible to use the full 300 GB.

However: it may not be possible to boot from it.
I do not know your motherboard, and I do know there were some
motherboards with biosses that could only adres 128 GiB. I do not know
exactly when this was (might be way before the 1600 MHz PIII) and I do
not know if this really matters, but it is worth noting.

If you are only planning to add the drive and not use it as boot
device there will be no problem.
<extra info>
Windoze uses the information provided by the bios to determine what
the specs of the harddisks, and will not be able to see the extra
space if the bios doesn't see it. Linux checks the harddisks by itself
and will see the space if the bios doesn't. This has an disadvantage:
the startup time is a bit bigger, because Linux has to perform an
extra check
However, Linux is build to be eternal (close to it) so you do not have
to reboot often. It also has an advantage, because Linux can detect
drives whether the Bios detects them or not. This is especially
usefull in old servers with large harddisks.
</extra info>

Neil
--
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1. People who start their arrays with 1.
1. People who start their arrays with 0.

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Old 04-03-2008, 09:35 AM
"Art Baur"
 
Default video card

Thank you Neil the computer is a Dell Inspiron year 2000 Bios 08 and to why
it took 4 days. I keep tiring to install in VGA install and keep getting the
Vesa fault. Brought the pixel count down and installed. Had rom for drivers
and installed at same time. The Compaq I don't have the drivers and am
tiring to round them up before I do the change over. The Compaq is 2005. I
plan on weighting for the LTS release on 4.24.008 before I change over.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Neil" <hok.krat@gmail.com>
To: "Ubuntu user technical support,not for general discussions"
<ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com>
Sent: Thursday, April 03, 2008 2:53 AM
Subject: Re: video card


> On Tue, Apr 1, 2008 at 10:00 AM, Art Baur <chivo@myclearwave.net> wrote:
>>
>>
>> My desk top has a Nvidia Vanta/ Vanta card and I want to switch it over
>> to
>> something better and Ubuntu friendly(still running XP). I want a better
>> image and something were I don't have to bash my brains out to install.
>> My
>> lap top took me 4 day to resolve. Okay I'm sloooooow. Last question I'm
>> also
>> installing a new 300 gig Harddrive will ubuntu recognize all the gig?
>> Comp
>> is a Compaq and for my motherboard have no idea. Pentium 3 at 1600. All
>> ideas welcome.
>> --
>> ubuntu-users mailing list
>> ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
>> Modify settings or unsubscribe at:
>> https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
>>
>>
>
> All but maybe the newest Nvidea or Radeon cards are supported. Nvidea
> and Radeon offer proprietary drivers on their sites (download section,
> choose card, choose Linux I believe), but you shouldn't need them.
>
> Did you try to install Ubuntu on the laptop (I'll assume that)?
> What took so long?
> - The graphics card (symptoms: only low resolutions allowed or
> crashing at the first signs of something else as the text)?
> - The lack of cdrom drive (some old laptops have that problem)?
> - To little memory (the normal installer seems to demand 300 megs)?
>
> What kind of laptop is it? What is in it (CPU, graphics card,
> motherboard ) ?
> Answers to these questions would help in defining where the problems
> of your laptop install is, and therefore whether you might encounter
> them on the upgrading of your desktop PC.
>
> The hard drive question: The hard drive will be recognised. It will be
> possible to use the full 300 GB.
>
> However: it may not be possible to boot from it.
> I do not know your motherboard, and I do know there were some
> motherboards with biosses that could only adres 128 GiB. I do not know
> exactly when this was (might be way before the 1600 MHz PIII) and I do
> not know if this really matters, but it is worth noting.
>
> If you are only planning to add the drive and not use it as boot
> device there will be no problem.
> <extra info>
> Windoze uses the information provided by the bios to determine what
> the specs of the harddisks, and will not be able to see the extra
> space if the bios doesn't see it. Linux checks the harddisks by itself
> and will see the space if the bios doesn't. This has an disadvantage:
> the startup time is a bit bigger, because Linux has to perform an
> extra check
> However, Linux is build to be eternal (close to it) so you do not have
> to reboot often. It also has an advantage, because Linux can detect
> drives whether the Bios detects them or not. This is especially
> usefull in old servers with large harddisks.
> </extra info>
>
> Neil
> --
> There are two kinds of people:
> 1. People who start their arrays with 1.
> 1. People who start their arrays with 0.
>
> --
> ubuntu-users mailing list
> ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
> Modify settings or unsubscribe at:
> https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users


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Old 09-22-2008, 04:19 PM
"Dan Steele"
 
Default Video card

What is the least amount of memory needed on a video card to take advantage of all the 3D effects offered by Fedora 9??

************************************************** *************************************** Dan


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Old 09-22-2008, 04:35 PM
Chris Tyler
 
Default Video card

On Mon, 2008-09-22 at 09:19 -0700, Dan Steele wrote:
> What is the least amount of memory needed on a video card to take
> advantage of all the 3D effects offered by Fedora 9??
>
>
> Dan


Hi Dan,

I've run Compiz on 64MB cards. I suspect you could go lower as long as
the memory was at least several times the size of the framebuffer.

Chipset support is really the issue -- almost any contemporary video
card with at least tens of megabytes of RAM should be able to support
Compiz (or kwin's effects) *if* the driver for the card's chipset
supports the COMPOSITE extension.

-Chris


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Old 10-06-2008, 09:04 PM
Dan
 
Default Video card

Could you give me some names of Video cards that are most compatible
with Fedora 9 and that have drivers for Fedora 9??



Thank you dan

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Old 10-06-2008, 09:37 PM
Bruno Wolff III
 
Default Video card

On Mon, Oct 06, 2008 at 14:04:25 -0700,
Dan <dan.steele.d@gmail.com> wrote:
> Could you give me some names of Video cards that are most compatible
> with Fedora 9 and that have drivers for Fedora 9??

Do you care if the drivers are free?
Do you need high performance or mostly just reliability?
What kind of busses do you have to plug the card into?
What architecure is your machine?
Is it a desktop, laptop, handheld?
Anything else special about it that you need to work?

Personally I had good success with an AGP Radeon 9200 using Fedora 9.
(Rawhide Radeon support is iffy right now, but will probably be good again
by the release.) It isn't real high performance, but was economical, didn't
need an extra fan, was obtained for a fairly reasonable price and was able
to work with a free driver bundled with Fedora.

Of the more common players in the desktop area, Intel and AMD/ATI are providing
information that allows Fedora to support their video cards. nVidia is not.
nVidia supplies binary only drivers which imposes limitations on other
packages in Fedora.

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Old 10-06-2008, 09:54 PM
Dennis Kaptain
 
Default Video card

>
> Could you give me some names of Video cards that are most compatible
> with Fedora 9 and that have drivers for Fedora 9??
>
>
> Thank you dan

Dan
Fedora does not have an official Hardware compatibility list. See
http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/HCL

There is a lot of good information available at
http://www.linuxquestions.org/hcl/index.php

Good luck

Dennis K


¡Todo sobre Amor y Sexo!
La guía completa para tu vida en Mujer de Hoy.
http://mx.mujer.yahoo.com/

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Old 10-06-2008, 11:27 PM
"Paul Johnson"
 
Default Video card

On Mon, Oct 6, 2008 at 4:04 PM, Dan <dan.steele.d@gmail.com> wrote:
> Could you give me some names of Video cards that are most compatible with
> Fedora 9 and that have drivers for Fedora 9??
>
> Thank you dan
>
> --
People ask this all the time, and never get a very helpful answer, I'm
afraid. This might sound mean, but you might learn from my
experience. I think you are barking up the wrong tree if you think
the Fedora core users are going to help you very much with the choice
of video hardware or the development of software.

I stopped using Fedora as my main desktop OS because releases
repeatedly broke the Nvidia or ATI drivers and there was an inevitable
period of searching and re-compiling and yelling about the fact that
the video card did not work right. In F9, the new xorg beta was used
and Nvidia did not have a driver ready. The "nv" driver was simply
full of trouble. It did not render lots of things properly for me and
I thought F9 was a total bust. As it has always been with RedHat &
Fedora, you have to find the "Nvidia" commercial driver from some
other source. Usually I've found the most help from livna.rpm. If the
Nvidia can work, they usually know how to make it. (When F9 was
released, I'd guess it was 2 or 3 weeks before there was an Nvidia
RPM. And if you let F9 upgrade to the latest kernel, you'll usually
have some excitement trying to rebuild the Nvidia video module to
match the kernel.) You'll note they currently have no offerings for
ATI on the livna site, and they do have a list of video cards that
they recommend you should not get.

As far as I can tell now, the test version of Nvidia does work pretty
well on a Dell Latitude D820 with the Nvidia Quadro. I also have some
dell workstations with older ATI Radeon X300 and getting a video
config that works on them with F9 has been trouble. The radeon driver
can display well enough in 2D, except for some random lines popping
out now and then. No 3D, as far as I can tell. If you google enough,
you'll find yourself to a "howto" that says you should uninstall the
xorg drivers from F9 and reinstall the ones from F8. I found that
unsatisfying, to say the least, but if you are a ATI owner, there may
be no choice.

If I were buying something now, I'd look at Intel video cards and/or
motherboards with built-in video from Intel. Several people have
pointed out that Intel is actually engaged in open source research
and some people say the 3D drivers for them are better. But I don't
have any Intel devices to test.

This page encourages me:

http://support.intel.com/support/graphics/sb/CS-010512.htm

They give a list of cards, and I'd stay within that list if I were you.

If you already have a video card and can't get it working in F9, you
might try a different Linux distribution. I've tried two options,
neither one quite perfect. One is to stay in the RPM framework, but
switch to Centos, which is more conservative and does not push ahead
of the software support. Centos is a free version of RedHat, and I'd
say it lags behind Fedora's kernel & video by at least a year. The
downside there is that the release maintainers still contend that they
have no responsibility for making sure that the proprietary drivers
will work. So you go off hunting for RPMs from some place on the
internet. You are likely to find them, however.

The only other alternative I've tried is to switch to the Ubuntu
distribution. The team there tries to co-ordinate with video
software, so when they have a release, they try to make sure they can
point you to a place where you can get video drivers. This site
http://www.desktoplinux.com/news/NS7895189911.html says they actually
include some proprietary drivers, but I have a recollection that they
did not install by default. I think I had to ask for a proprietary
repository during the install. There is a "linux-restricted-modules"
package...

--
Paul E. Johnson
Professor, Political Science
1541 Lilac Lane, Room 504
University of Kansas

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Old 10-07-2008, 12:48 AM
"Alan Evans"
 
Default Video card

On Mon, Oct 6, 2008 at 4:27 PM, Paul Johnson <pauljohn32@gmail.com> wrote:
> I think you are barking up the wrong tree if you think
> the Fedora core users are going to help you very much with the choice
> of video hardware or the development of software.

Indeed. It actually shocks me a little. Lots of things work, more and
more as time passes. But, it seems to me, lots of relatively common
things don't work. And reliable lists of working hardware are
difficult to cross-reference for things like which distro it
apparently worked on, or if they say so, it's relevant to FC2 or
something.

I, for example, have been trying to figure out if anybody has seen any
dual-head pci-x card work with Fedora out of the box. I pay pretty
close attention every time someone one the list brings up choosing
video hardware, but every solution seems to involve recompiling some
core system component or using binary drivers. And most don't get
anything to work until they've appeased the
Endlessly-Tweaking-Config-Files god.

I keep telling myself, "Someday!" And that someday seems closer all
the time, but as far as I can tell, it hasn't arrived yet.

*sigh*

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Old 10-07-2008, 01:57 AM
"suvayu ali"
 
Default Video card

Hello Dan,

As pointed out by Dennis the Hardware Compatibility
List maintained by Fedora is out of date by 4 years. I am afraid your
only resource for this kind of information is experiences of other
users. The HCL for other distros are not any better off either
specially when you are searching for something relatively new. Probably
the gentoo wiki has the most upto date list.


As for me, my experience with proprietary graphics drivers (even
the ones repackaged by livna) have not been pretty. Although me being a
new linux convert might have a lot to do with it. If you are interested
in something better than the regular inbuilt graphics chips, I would
suggest you look in http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=category&item=Graphics%20Cards


Hope this helps
--
Suvayu

Open source is the future. It sets us free.


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