FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
» Video Reviews

» Linux Archive

Linux-archive is a website aiming to archive linux email lists and to make them easily accessible for linux users/developers.


» Sponsor

» Partners

» Sponsor

Go Back   Linux Archive > Ubuntu > Ubuntu User

 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
 
Old 12-23-2011, 12:46 PM
Billie Walsh
 
Default Newbie query: Ubuntu vs openSUSE

On 12/23/2011 05:35 AM, Rameshwar Kr. Sharma wrote:

On Fri, Dec 23, 2011 at 3:52 PM, Jamie Paul Griffin
<jamie@kontrol.kode5.net> wrote:


Having tried OpenSuse I can say that Ubuntu is certainly the better
choice, in my opinion. The package manager is superior and overall
finish and quality is better. I remember I came across an article
comparing the two where the author described YAST as "a pig" which
made me laugh; and i'm afraid that based on my experiences at that
time, I have to agree.


Okay I don't know, may be Yast is the package manager, but **how**
package manager of Ubuntu is better, can you please explain me a
little?


Ubuntu have designed their system with new Linux users in mind. You
will have a really good system to learn on.


Okk, then I must go with Ubuntu.


One thing you must consider when it comes to choosing a desktop
environment is the hardware on which you will use Linux, especially
the graphics hardware. The reason is that if you are using older
hardware you might find that newer versions of KDE4 and Unity, for
example, will be terribly slow and it could ruin your new
experience. Please bare that in mind. XFCE4 has been designed to
overcome some of those problems and so is more lightweight in terms
of memory, etc.


Okay, my hard ware is nether too old nor is extremely new, its in
between.


Don't forget that many distributions provide the option to have
discs sent to you by post. Some you may need to make a small
donation, others will be free. You can then use the liveCD option
or you could think about running them in a virtual environment,
like Virtual Box or VMWare.


Okk, I didn't know this fact, I try then.



If your migrating from a Windows system the KDE desktop [ Kubuntu ] or
XFCE desktop [ Xubuntu ] will be more familiar to you and may make the
transition a bit easier. In Ubuntu the Gnome, and possibly Unity [ I
haven't really looked into Unity myself ], are more MAC like in their
setup.

As I read the list it seems that Unity is somewhat of a major departure
from Gnome and was pushed out to the public quite early in development.
You must understand that the developers are much more limited in what
they can test on than the community at large. It's by pushing out to the
public and the public filing bug reports that the interface gets "fixed"
and matures much faster. When KDE4.x was first pushed out it was very
immature and caused a lot of issues. As time has gone by it has matured
almost to the point KDE3.x was when phased out, and keeps getting
better. Given time Unity will mature and get better.


Asking which system [ Ubuntu or Suse ] is better is, as they say in the
USA, like asking which is better, a Ford or a Chevrolet. Both are very
good and the choice comes down to personal preference.


Many years ago in another life I worked in a garage. A guy came in and
as his car was being worked on he made the remark that he loved his
Pontiac Ventura but there was no way he would ever drive a Chevrolet.
Pontiac was a MUCH better car than a Chevrolet. I didn't have the heart
to tell him that his much beloved Pontiac Ventura was just a rebadged
Chevrolet Nova and even had a Chevrolet motor in it.


When you get right down to the guts of it all Linux is Linux, like
Chevrolet and Pontiac are/were both General Motors products and shared
much. The part that makes for a different user experience is the bells
and whistles that are added on. Some people like some bells and whistles
better than they like others.


--
“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain
the people, it is an instrument for the people to restrain the
government lest it come to dominate our lives and interests”.

- Patrick Henry -


_ _... ..._ _
_._ ._ ..... ._.. ... .._

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
 
Old 12-23-2011, 12:57 PM
"Rameshwar Kr. Sharma"
 
Default Newbie query: Ubuntu vs openSUSE

On Fri, Dec 23, 2011 at 6:37 PM, Hans Muecke
<ubuntu-ml01@filderstadtweather.eu> wrote:

> I was on openSUSE before I changed to Ubuntu and since I use(d) KDE on both
> distros I actually can't see much difference between both.
> However ... the reason to switch to Ubuntu was, that on openSUSE - at least on
> my end - no upgrade went without some major trouble.

Okk.

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
 
Old 12-23-2011, 02:55 PM
"Rameshwar Kr. Sharma"
 
Default Newbie query: Ubuntu vs openSUSE

On Fri, Dec 23, 2011 at 7:16 PM, Billie Walsh <bilwalsh@swbell.net> wrote:

> If your migrating from a Windows system the KDE desktop [ Kubuntu ] or
> XFCE desktop [ Xubuntu ] will be more familiar to you and may make the
> transition a bit easier. In Ubuntu the Gnome, and possibly Unity [ I
> haven't really looked into Unity myself ], are more MAC like in their
> setup.

Okk.

> As I read the list it seems that Unity is somewhat of a major departure from
> Gnome and was pushed out to the public quite early in development. You must
> understand that the developers are much more limited in what they can test
> on than the community at large. It's by pushing out to the public and the
> public filing bug reports that the interface gets "fixed" and matures much
> faster. When KDE4.x was first pushed out it was very immature and caused a
> lot of issues. As time has gone by it has matured almost to the point KDE3.x
> was when phased out, and keeps getting better. Given time Unity will mature
> and get better.

Okk, true that the users are the real lives and can make it to live,
the distributions, they correct the things, nice, correct.

> Asking which system [ Ubuntu or Suse ] is better is, as they say in the USA,
> like asking which is better, a Ford or a Chevrolet. Both are very good and
> the choice comes down to personal preference.

-, nice analogy.

> Many years ago in another life I worked in a garage. A guy came in and as
> his car was being worked on he made the remark that he loved his Pontiac
> Ventura but there was no way he would ever drive a Chevrolet. Pontiac was a
> MUCH better car than a Chevrolet. I didn't have the heart to tell him that
> his much beloved Pontiac Ventura was just a rebadged Chevrolet Nova and even
> had a Chevrolet motor in it.

-

> When you get right down to the guts of it all Linux is Linux, like Chevrolet
> and Pontiac are/were both General Motors products and shared much. The part
> that makes for a different user experience is the bells and whistles that
> are added on. Some people like some bells and whistles better than they like
> others.

Nice explanation, thanks for it, could you also in a similar fashion
elaborate the difference between the excellent ubuntu package manager
and than of openSUSE for information point of view.

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
 
Old 12-23-2011, 03:07 PM
Liam Proven
 
Default Newbie query: Ubuntu vs openSUSE

On 23 December 2011 11:35, Rameshwar Kr. Sharma
<mathsrealworld@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Fri, Dec 23, 2011 at 3:52 PM, Jamie Paul Griffin
> <jamie@kontrol.kode5.net> wrote:
>
>> Having tried OpenSuse I can say that Ubuntu is certainly the better choice, in my opinion. The package manager is superior and overall finish and quality is better. I remember I came across an article comparing the two where the author described YAST as "a pig" which made me laugh; and i'm afraid that based on my experiences at that time, I have to agree.
>
> Okay I don't know, may be Yast is the package manager, but **how**
> package manager of Ubuntu is better, can you please explain me a
> little?

SUSE is an old distro, dating back 15y or so. It predates home
broadband. Its original unique selling point was that it came with all
the software you would ever need, on multiple CDs, then later on many
CDs + a DVD, then on multiple DVDs.

It also has good, rich, complete system admin tools, notably YAST.
YAST stands for Yet Another Setup Tool and was originally the
installer. Now, YAST2 is also the main point of control for your
system - adding and removing users, configuring hardware, adding and
removing software, updating, etc.

It is much more than just a package management system.

SUSE was for a long time based on KDE. Later it adopted GNOME too and
the company bought Ximian, one of the main GNOME software development
houses. It also supports lots of other distros.

SUSE is now owned by Novell, which in turn is owned by Attachmate, 2
big American companies. It has a strong corporate focus with expensive
corporate versions with support contracts.

SUSE has signed a pact with Microsoft which means it can use the
Windows-like KDE desktop without fear of being sued for patent
infringement, so since the announcement of GNOME 3, SUSE announced it
was returning to its KDE-centric roots.

SUSE is based on RPM, the Red Hat Package Manager. It is easy to use
but does not feature automatic dependency resolution - when you
install a piece of software, it is up to you to install all the
extras, the libraries and things, that it depends on. YAST tries to
automate this for you but in my experience it is patchy and often
fails.

It's good, but it's big, complex and relatively slow, in my personal
experience. It hearkens back to the days of the 1990s when you had
thousands of choices and decisions to make.

Ubuntu is much newer. It is about 7y old. It's based on Debian, which
is the hacker's distro of choice, but polished and made much easier.
Debian is even older than SUSE but it is notoriously complicated and
unfriendly, although it is much better these days. Ubuntu is Debian
simplified for non-techies.

Ubuntu is small and simple. It comes with 1 best choice of app for all
the main tasks - 1 office suite, 1 media player, 1 web browser, etc.
SUSE offers dozens of alternatives. Ubuntu has the alternatives too
but it doesn't ask you - the default install comes on just 1 CD and
contains 1 example of each app. SUSE asks you to choose, which is
harder if you don't know enough to decide.

Ubuntu uses the Debian packaging system, DEB and APT-GET. This is
unarguably the best and most sophisticated system for any Unix and is
widely copied but never bettered. It pioneered automatic recursive
depenency resolution, meaning that APT figures out all the libraries
and things all your programs need and installs *and updates* them for
you automatically. SUSE tries to replicate this with YAST but it's not
as good. Red Hat tries with YUM, Mandriva with URPMI, but none are
even close, IMHO. Apt-get wins, hands down. The theory is that once
you install you need never reinstall as Apt will update your whole OS
for you - indefinitely.

Ubuntu offers few choices of desktop or tools, but everything is there
in its online repositories if you want to experiment as you learn
more.

Ubuntu is based on GNOME and now the in-house developed Unity shell on
top of GNOME. Some people don't like GNOME. Some favour KDE, or other
alternatives such as Xfce or LXDE. Canonical, Ubuntu's backers,
actively encourage these communities to create their own "remixes" of
Ubuntu with different desktops and sets of apps. For instance,
Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu and so on. Some - the ones with "-buntu" in
their name - are officially sanctioned, but the main "real" Ubuntu is
the one with nothing else on its name. Some of the remixes are pretty
good but the most polished and complete, and the best-supported, is
real Ubuntu. Some 3rd party tools and apps may not work on the
remixes. For the best experience, stay with the "real thing".

In summary:

Ubuntu: relatively small, modern, simple, streamlined. Very easy and polished.

SUSE: big, very capable, quite complex, many many options. Good admin
tools but software management inferior, as is that of all the
RPM-based distros.

--
Liam Proven • Info & profile: http://www.google.com/profiles/lproven
Email: lproven@cix.co.uk • GMail/GoogleTalk/Orkut: lproven@gmail.com
Tel: +44 20-8685-0498 • Cell: +44 7939-087884 • Fax: + 44 870-9151419
AIM/Yahoo/Skype: liamproven • MSN: lproven@hotmail.com • ICQ: 73187508

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
 
Old 12-23-2011, 03:24 PM
Johnny
 
Default Newbie query: Ubuntu vs openSUSE

If you use anything but Ubuntu. Most of the other live CD I have to
disable ipv6 thing to get on the Internet with Firefox. I have 3 PCs and
have do do it on all. I did write this but if you try something other
that Ubuntu 11.10 you might want it handy. You can do a config:about and
disable there but that only helps Firefox. I like unity. But I use
unity2 better than Gnome. Just me.

Merry Christmas and God Bless Johnny3 65+++

On 12/15/2011 05:56 PM, Greg Pelly wrote:

Hi,

I have HBase installed on a a Ubuntu 11.04 box. It's having problems and
they are due to the fact that ipv6 is enabled, the advice is to disable
ipv6. The method of disabling appears to be adding the following three
lines to sysctl.conf:

***net.ipv6.conf.all.disable_ipv6 = 1*
*net.ipv6.conf.default.disable_ipv6 = 1*
*net.ipv6.conf.lo.disable_ipv6 = 1




Easier way to do this is to pass the kernel a parameter to disable ipv6
on bootup. To do that, edit /etc/default/grub and add
"ipv6.disable_ipv6=1" on the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT line so it looks
similar to the following:


GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash ipv6.disable_ipv6=1"

Save the file and then run "sudo update-grub" to update grub.cfg and
generate new initramfs images. Reboot and ipv6 should be disabled on all
interfaces.



On 12/23/2011 11:07 AM, Liam Proven wrote:

On 23 December 2011 11:35, Rameshwar Kr. Sharma
<mathsrealworld@gmail.com> wrote:

On Fri, Dec 23, 2011 at 3:52 PM, Jamie Paul Griffin
<jamie@kontrol.kode5.net> wrote:


Having tried OpenSuse I can say that Ubuntu is certainly the better choice, in my opinion. The package manager is superior and overall finish and quality is better. I remember I came across an article comparing the two where the author described YAST as "a pig" which made me laugh; and i'm afraid that based on my experiences at that time, I have to agree.

Okay I don't know, may be Yast is the package manager, but **how**
package manager of Ubuntu is better, can you please explain me a
little?

SUSE is an old distro, dating back 15y or so. It predates home
broadband. Its original unique selling point was that it came with all
the software you would ever need, on multiple CDs, then later on many
CDs + a DVD, then on multiple DVDs.

It also has good, rich, complete system admin tools, notably YAST.
YAST stands for Yet Another Setup Tool and was originally the
installer. Now, YAST2 is also the main point of control for your
system - adding and removing users, configuring hardware, adding and
removing software, updating, etc.

It is much more than just a package management system.

SUSE was for a long time based on KDE. Later it adopted GNOME too and
the company bought Ximian, one of the main GNOME software development
houses. It also supports lots of other distros.

SUSE is now owned by Novell, which in turn is owned by Attachmate, 2
big American companies. It has a strong corporate focus with expensive
corporate versions with support contracts.

SUSE has signed a pact with Microsoft which means it can use the
Windows-like KDE desktop without fear of being sued for patent
infringement, so since the announcement of GNOME 3, SUSE announced it
was returning to its KDE-centric roots.

SUSE is based on RPM, the Red Hat Package Manager. It is easy to use
but does not feature automatic dependency resolution - when you
install a piece of software, it is up to you to install all the
extras, the libraries and things, that it depends on. YAST tries to
automate this for you but in my experience it is patchy and often
fails.

It's good, but it's big, complex and relatively slow, in my personal
experience. It hearkens back to the days of the 1990s when you had
thousands of choices and decisions to make.

Ubuntu is much newer. It is about 7y old. It's based on Debian, which
is the hacker's distro of choice, but polished and made much easier.
Debian is even older than SUSE but it is notoriously complicated and
unfriendly, although it is much better these days. Ubuntu is Debian
simplified for non-techies.

Ubuntu is small and simple. It comes with 1 best choice of app for all
the main tasks - 1 office suite, 1 media player, 1 web browser, etc.
SUSE offers dozens of alternatives. Ubuntu has the alternatives too
but it doesn't ask you - the default install comes on just 1 CD and
contains 1 example of each app. SUSE asks you to choose, which is
harder if you don't know enough to decide.

Ubuntu uses the Debian packaging system, DEB and APT-GET. This is
unarguably the best and most sophisticated system for any Unix and is
widely copied but never bettered. It pioneered automatic recursive
depenency resolution, meaning that APT figures out all the libraries
and things all your programs need and installs *and updates* them for
you automatically. SUSE tries to replicate this with YAST but it's not
as good. Red Hat tries with YUM, Mandriva with URPMI, but none are
even close, IMHO. Apt-get wins, hands down. The theory is that once
you install you need never reinstall as Apt will update your whole OS
for you - indefinitely.

Ubuntu offers few choices of desktop or tools, but everything is there
in its online repositories if you want to experiment as you learn
more.

Ubuntu is based on GNOME and now the in-house developed Unity shell on
top of GNOME. Some people don't like GNOME. Some favour KDE, or other
alternatives such as Xfce or LXDE. Canonical, Ubuntu's backers,
actively encourage these communities to create their own "remixes" of
Ubuntu with different desktops and sets of apps. For instance,
Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu and so on. Some - the ones with "-buntu" in
their name - are officially sanctioned, but the main "real" Ubuntu is
the one with nothing else on its name. Some of the remixes are pretty
good but the most polished and complete, and the best-supported, is
real Ubuntu. Some 3rd party tools and apps may not work on the
remixes. For the best experience, stay with the "real thing".

In summary:

Ubuntu: relatively small, modern, simple, streamlined. Very easy and polished.

SUSE: big, very capable, quite complex, many many options. Good admin
tools but software management inferior, as is that of all the
RPM-based distros.




--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
 
Old 12-23-2011, 03:58 PM
Craig White
 
Default Newbie query: Ubuntu vs openSUSE

On Fri, 2011-12-23 at 11:07 +0530, Rameshwar Kr. Sharma wrote:
> HELLO GUYS,
>
> I really needed the suggestion of the people of this great mailing
> list regarding the difference between the openSUSE and the Ubuntu
> distributions, finding myself new in this world of Linux or Unix
> (whatever you people call), I guess here people have nice experiences
> and thus can make better points.
----
I was feeling somewhat sympathetic for you when you asked sort of the
same thing on fedora-list and George harangued you for thinking that you
had already done this very same thing as user LinuxIsOne...

http://lists.fedoraproject.org/pipermail/users/2011-December/410414.html

But now that I realize that on the above, you dissed Ubuntu and come
back 3 days later and ask the Ubuntu list the same thing, then it's
clear that you are just a stupid troll.

Rather unsurprisingly, the answers here on the Ubuntu list pretty much
match those you got from fedora-list and I didn't check, but I suppose
you pretty much did the same thing on some suse list too.

Knowing how you just waste everyone's time on various lists, I'm not
sure why anyone would want to actually answer any of your questions... I
know I certainly won't.

Craig


--
This message has been scanned for viruses and
dangerous content by MailScanner, and is
believed to be clean.


--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
 
Old 12-23-2011, 05:49 PM
sdavmor
 
Default Newbie query: Ubuntu vs openSUSE

On 12/23/2011 08:07 AM, Liam Proven wrote:

[snip all the well-written well-thought out response]


In summary:

Ubuntu: relatively small, modern, simple, streamlined. Very easy
andpolished.

SUSE: big, very capable, quite complex, many many options. Good
admin tools but software management inferior, as is that of all
the RPM-based distros.


That's an excellent summary you've provided, Liam.
--
Cheers, SDM -- a 21st Century Schizoid Man
Systems Theory project website: http://systemstheory.net
find us on MySpace, GarageBand, Reverb Nation, Last FM, CDBaby
free MP3s of Systems Theory, Mike Dickson & Greg Amov music at
http://mikedickson.org.uk

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
 
Old 12-23-2011, 06:02 PM
Ric Moore
 
Default Newbie query: Ubuntu vs openSUSE

On 12/23/2011 07:48 AM, Rameshwar Kr. Sharma wrote:


Well thanks for the suggestions. I would read but right now can one
tell me the difference between the two package managers :- Yast and
Ubuntu's in general terms?


We're getting to the point of beating a dead horse now. What part of
trying it out are you missing out on?? If YOU like it, it's good. If you
don't like it, don't use it. EOL. You asked a question, you got answers
to try. Don't ask more questions while ignoring the previous answers, or
you'll start making people slow to respond you or worse, add you to
their junk filters. Better yet, use google. But, trolling for "us versus
them", is not considered a good thing, as I pointed out before. We don't
do that. Ric


--
My father, Victor Moore (Vic) used to say:
"There are two Great Sins in the world...
..the Sin of Ignorance, and the Sin of Stupidity.
Only the former may be overcome." R.I.P. Dad.
http://linuxcounter.net/user/44256.html

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
 
Old 12-23-2011, 06:16 PM
Ric Moore
 
Default Newbie query: Ubuntu vs openSUSE

On 12/23/2011 01:49 PM, sdavmor wrote:

On 12/23/2011 08:07 AM, Liam Proven wrote:

[snip all the well-written well-thought out response]


In summary:

Ubuntu: relatively small, modern, simple, streamlined. Very easy
andpolished.

SUSE: big, very capable, quite complex, many many options. Good
admin tools but software management inferior, as is that of all
the RPM-based distros.


That's an excellent summary you've provided, Liam.


Liam, somehow you're coming off dissing rpm, which I'm sure wasn't your
intent. Ric


--
My father, Victor Moore (Vic) used to say:
"There are two Great Sins in the world...
..the Sin of Ignorance, and the Sin of Stupidity.
Only the former may be overcome." R.I.P. Dad.
http://linuxcounter.net/user/44256.html

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
 
Old 12-23-2011, 08:35 PM
doug
 
Default Newbie query: Ubuntu vs openSUSE

On 12/23/2011 02:16 PM, Ric Moore wrote:

On 12/23/2011 01:49 PM, sdavmor wrote:

On 12/23/2011 08:07 AM, Liam Proven wrote:

[snip all the well-written well-thought out response]


In summary:

Ubuntu: relatively small, modern, simple, streamlined. Very easy
andpolished.

SUSE: big, very capable, quite complex, many many options. Good
admin tools but software management inferior, as is that of all
the RPM-based distros.


That's an excellent summary you've provided, Liam.


Liam, somehow you're coming off dissing rpm, which I'm sure wasn't
your intent. Ric


Synaptic Package Manager is used with RPM in Pclinuxos, and with Gnome
in Mint, and
I think it's a very nice, usable program. I don't like YAST, and I
don't care for apt-get, since
you need the filename ahead of time with apt-get. Synaptic provides a
nice list, along

with a search function.

--doug

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
 

Thread Tools




All times are GMT. The time now is 01:29 AM.

VBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2007, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2007 - 2008, www.linux-archive.org