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Old 12-14-2011, 03:12 PM
Bill Stanley
 
Default Reading and writing files to a Windows partition

I dual boot with Windows. My Linus partitions are the usual partitions
and for windows I have 2 partitions C: and D: with D being a small
partition where I keep files that both Windows and Linux access. I
never write to C: and seldom read files on C:. I do this because in the
past file access to Windows was uncertain. (If I somehow mess up D:
with Linux writing files, its not a disaster.)


My question is... With the improvements to Linux are these precautions
needed? Is Linux access to Win32 and NTFS file systems reliable enough
to not have to worry about?


Bill Stanley

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Old 12-14-2011, 04:08 PM
Liam Proven
 
Default Reading and writing files to a Windows partition

On 14 December 2011 16:12, Bill Stanley <bstanle@wowway.com> wrote:
> I dual boot with Windows. *My Linus partitions are the usual partitions and
> for windows I have 2 partitions C: and D: with D being a small partition
> where I keep files that both Windows and Linux access. *I never write to C:
> and seldom read files on C:. *I do this because in the past file access to
> Windows was uncertain. *(If I somehow mess up D: with Linux writing files,
> its not a disaster.)
>
> My question is... With the improvements to Linux are these precautions
> needed? *Is Linux access to Win32 and NTFS file systems reliable enough to
> not have to worry about?

I wouldn't worry. I have no problems reading in 15y and none writing
for 10-12. The only things I've known can cause issues are:

[1] Windows drive is *very* badly corrupted

(But Linux is more tolerant of this than Windows is! Try not to write
to badly-corrupted drives, though. If possible & if you're not doing
data recovery from a dying disk, fix it by running CHKDSK /F *from
Windows*. The freely-downloadable Windows 7 Recovery CD is good for
this. It's a good idea to do this regularly anyway as part of your
maintenance schedule.)

[2] Windows RAID and volume sets don't work

(Well, it might be possible with a *lot* of effort and fiddling).

[3] Windows whole-disk encrypted volumes don't work (e.g. Bitlocker), AFAIK.

This is by design; it's what the encryption is intended to defeat.

But a happy, working Windows drive in FAT16, FAT32 or NTFS should be
just fine. I routinely use a LiveCD for cleaning up temp files and so
on, in fact!

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Old 12-14-2011, 06:11 PM
doug
 
Default Reading and writing files to a Windows partition

On 12/14/2011 11:12 AM, Bill Stanley wrote:
I dual boot with Windows. My Linus partitions are the usual
partitions and for windows I have 2 partitions C: and D: with D being
a small partition where I keep files that both Windows and Linux
access. I never write to C: and seldom read files on C:. I do this
because in the past file access to Windows was uncertain. (If I
somehow mess up D: with Linux writing files, its not a disaster.)


My question is... With the improvements to Linux are these precautions
needed? Is Linux access to Win32 and NTFS file systems reliable
enough to not have to worry about?


Bill Stanley

I have downloaded Windows files using my Linux system, and then copied
them via Dolphin to the Windows
partition. Having done that, I have opened them successfully in
Windows. I have perhaps done that a dozen times,

so it may not be definitive, but so far, all is copacetic.

--doug

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Old 12-14-2011, 07:31 PM
"David C. Curtis"
 
Default Reading and writing files to a Windows partition

On 11-12-14 11:12 AM, Bill Stanley wrote:

I dual boot with Windows. My Linus partitions are the usual partitions
and for windows I have 2 partitions C: and D: with D being a small
partition where I keep files that both Windows and Linux access. I never
write to C: and seldom read files on C:. I do this because in the past
file access to Windows was uncertain. (If I somehow mess up D: with
Linux writing files, its not a disaster.)

My question is... With the improvements to Linux are these precautions
needed? Is Linux access to Win32 and NTFS file systems reliable enough
to not have to worry about?


I read/write/delete files in Windows partitions from Linux all the time
with only one issue. Just don't write to the Windows partitions while
Windows is in hibernation. When it wakes it'll 'see' corrupted files and
delete them.


I don't know how windows (un)mounts file systems and what it does when
waking from hibernation but I have been bit by this quirk fairly
recently (win7, 10.10 IIRC) and lost data.



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Old 12-14-2011, 08:40 PM
Dave Woyciesjes
 
Default Reading and writing files to a Windows partition

On 12/14/2011 02:11 PM, doug wrote:

On 12/14/2011 11:12 AM, Bill Stanley wrote:

I dual boot with Windows. My Linus partitions are the usual partitions
and for windows I have 2 partitions C: and D: with D being a small
partition where I keep files that both Windows and Linux access. I
never write to C: and seldom read files on C:. I do this because in
the past file access to Windows was uncertain. (If I somehow mess up
D: with Linux writing files, its not a disaster.)

My question is... With the improvements to Linux are these precautions
needed? Is Linux access to Win32 and NTFS file systems reliable enough
to not have to worry about?

Bill Stanley


I have downloaded Windows files using my Linux system, and then copied
them via Dolphin to the Windows
partition. Having done that, I have opened them successfully in Windows.
I have perhaps done that a dozen times,
so it may not be definitive, but so far, all is copacetic.

--doug



For a while now, I've had my fstab setup to automagically mount the
NTFS partitions. Even the C drive. No issues. I even have my laptop
setup so the Documents, Music, Pictures, & Videos folder symlink to the
corresponding folders on the Windows partition.


As someone else mentioned, just don't try it if Windows hibernated. I
turn off Hibernation, personally.


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Old 12-14-2011, 11:14 PM
Basil Chupin
 
Default Reading and writing files to a Windows partition

On 15/12/11 07:31, David C. Curtis wrote:

On 11-12-14 11:12 AM, Bill Stanley wrote:

I dual boot with Windows. My Linus partitions are the usual partitions
and for windows I have 2 partitions C: and D: with D being a small
partition where I keep files that both Windows and Linux access. I never
write to C: and seldom read files on C:. I do this because in the past
file access to Windows was uncertain. (If I somehow mess up D: with
Linux writing files, its not a disaster.)

My question is... With the improvements to Linux are these precautions
needed? Is Linux access to Win32 and NTFS file systems reliable enough
to not have to worry about?


I read/write/delete files in Windows partitions from Linux all the
time with only one issue. Just don't write to the Windows partitions
while Windows is in hibernation. When it wakes it'll 'see' corrupted
files and delete them.


I don't know how windows (un)mounts file systems and what it does when
waking from hibernation but I have been bit by this quirk fairly
recently (win7, 10.10 IIRC) and lost data.


Forgive me for asking, but the OP stated that he DUAL BOOTS with Windows
so how can Windows be "in hibernation" when he is using Linux?


BC

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Old 12-14-2011, 11:37 PM
"David C. Curtis"
 
Default Reading and writing files to a Windows partition

On 11-12-14 07:14 PM, Basil Chupin wrote:

On 15/12/11 07:31, David C. Curtis wrote:

On 11-12-14 11:12 AM, Bill Stanley wrote:

I dual boot with Windows. My Linus partitions are the usual partitions
and for windows I have 2 partitions C: and D: with D being a small
partition where I keep files that both Windows and Linux access. I never
write to C: and seldom read files on C:. I do this because in the past
file access to Windows was uncertain. (If I somehow mess up D: with
Linux writing files, its not a disaster.)

My question is... With the improvements to Linux are these precautions
needed? Is Linux access to Win32 and NTFS file systems reliable enough
to not have to worry about?


I read/write/delete files in Windows partitions from Linux all the
time with only one issue. Just don't write to the Windows partitions
while Windows is in hibernation. When it wakes it'll 'see' corrupted
files and delete them.

I don't know how windows (un)mounts file systems and what it does when
waking from hibernation but I have been bit by this quirk fairly
recently (win7, 10.10 IIRC) and lost data.


Forgive me for asking, but the OP stated that he DUAL BOOTS with Windows
so how can Windows be "in hibernation" when he is using Linux?


Hibernation[0] is when the computer shuts down after writing the OS
state to disk. Suspend[1] (sleep, stand-by etc.) is the low-power 'I
just closed the laptop's lid' mode. You can hibernate Windows and boot
up into Ubuntu and vice-versa. You can't boot up another OS if you're in
suspension.


Again I don't know how, but Windows doesn't like it (and maybe Ubuntu
too, I've never tried it) if you write to it's partition while it's in
hibernation.


[0] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hibernation_(computing)
[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_mode

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Old 12-14-2011, 11:51 PM
Basil Chupin
 
Default Reading and writing files to a Windows partition

On 15/12/11 11:37, David C. Curtis wrote:

On 11-12-14 07:14 PM, Basil Chupin wrote:

On 15/12/11 07:31, David C. Curtis wrote:

On 11-12-14 11:12 AM, Bill Stanley wrote:

I dual boot with Windows. My Linus partitions are the usual partitions
and for windows I have 2 partitions C: and D: with D being a small
partition where I keep files that both Windows and Linux access. I
never

write to C: and seldom read files on C:. I do this because in the past
file access to Windows was uncertain. (If I somehow mess up D: with
Linux writing files, its not a disaster.)

My question is... With the improvements to Linux are these precautions
needed? Is Linux access to Win32 and NTFS file systems reliable enough
to not have to worry about?


I read/write/delete files in Windows partitions from Linux all the
time with only one issue. Just don't write to the Windows partitions
while Windows is in hibernation. When it wakes it'll 'see' corrupted
files and delete them.

I don't know how windows (un)mounts file systems and what it does when
waking from hibernation but I have been bit by this quirk fairly
recently (win7, 10.10 IIRC) and lost data.


Forgive me for asking, but the OP stated that he DUAL BOOTS with Windows
so how can Windows be "in hibernation" when he is using Linux?


Hibernation[0] is when the computer shuts down after writing the OS
state to disk. Suspend[1] (sleep, stand-by etc.) is the low-power 'I
just closed the laptop's lid' mode. You can hibernate Windows and boot
up into Ubuntu and vice-versa. You can't boot up another OS if you're
in suspension.


Again I don't know how, but Windows doesn't like it (and maybe Ubuntu
too, I've never tried it) if you write to it's partition while it's in
hibernation.


[0] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hibernation_(computing)
[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_mode



OK, thanks, now clarified.

BC

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Old 12-15-2011, 06:14 AM
Ric Moore
 
Default Reading and writing files to a Windows partition

On 12/14/2011 07:51 PM, Basil Chupin wrote:

On 15/12/11 11:37, David C. Curtis wrote:



Hibernation[0] is when the computer shuts down after writing the OS
state to disk. Suspend[1] (sleep, stand-by etc.) is the low-power 'I
just closed the laptop's lid' mode. You can hibernate Windows and boot
up into Ubuntu and vice-versa. You can't boot up another OS if you're
in suspension.

Again I don't know how, but Windows doesn't like it (and maybe Ubuntu
too, I've never tried it) if you write to it's partition while it's in
hibernation.

[0] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hibernation_(computing)
[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_mode



OK, thanks, now clarified.


That's a new one on me, too. Ric


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Old 12-15-2011, 08:33 AM
Koh Choon Lin
 
Default Reading and writing files to a Windows partition

Hi

> My question is... With the improvements to Linux are these precautions
> needed? *Is Linux access to Win32 and NTFS file systems reliable enough to
> not have to worry about?

I think your question is whether the kernel is able to handle FAT32
and NTFS perfectly, or as least as well as MS Windows does. Yes, I
would be able to trust it for my home computers but for mission
critical servers, no, I would not use it. Devising the technology used
for accessing NTFS is a catch up game as MS keeps on updating it.



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