FAQ Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
» Video Reviews

» Linux Archive

Linux-archive is a website aiming to archive linux email lists and to make them easily accessible for linux users/developers.


» Sponsor

» Partners

» Sponsor

Go Back   Linux Archive > Ubuntu > Ubuntu User

 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
 
Old 11-11-2011, 12:01 PM
CJ Tres
 
Default computers and cold temperatures

IS it a bad thing to have a computer operating, say, in a garage during
the cold winters?
I realize there is some discussion on running 24/7 due to heat/cold
expansion/contractions but it this machine were running 24/7 during
winter is there any reason to believe it would be detrimental to the comp?


Also wondering if anyone has any practical experience with storing
CDs/DVDs under cold conditions.
One report I read was full of technical terms but ultimately stated that
there isn't enough data to say one way or the other.


--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
 
Old 11-11-2011, 12:06 PM
Jacob Mansfield
 
Default computers and cold temperatures

On 11 Nov 2011, at 13:01, CJ Tres wrote:
> IS it a bad thing to have a computer operating, say, in a garage during the cold winters?
> I realize there is some discussion on running 24/7 due to heat/cold expansion/contractions but it this machine were running 24/7 during winter is there any reason to believe it would be detrimental to the comp?
>
> Also wondering if anyone has any practical experience with storing CDs/DVDs under cold conditions.
> One report I read was full of technical terms but ultimately stated that there isn't enough data to say one way or the other.


My company recently replaced it's server cabinet with a chest freezer!
all we've had so far is increased performance, and higher heating bills from when the engineers turn up the thermostat when they come back.
as for CDs, they don't appear to store well in cold conditions, but if they're inside the server, and being used/spun, the ice won't form

--
regards,
Jacob Mansfield,
Lead developer
jacob@bluesapphiremedia.com

Blue Sapphire Media reccomends
<a href="http://www.a2hosting.com/3244.html">A2 Hosting</a>



--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
 
Old 11-11-2011, 12:32 PM
Colin Law
 
Default computers and cold temperatures

On 11 November 2011 13:01, CJ Tres <ctres@grics.net> wrote:
> IS it a bad thing to have a computer operating, say, in a garage during the
> cold winters?
> I realize there is some discussion on running 24/7 due to heat/cold
> expansion/contractions but it this machine were running 24/7 during winter
> is there any reason to believe it would be detrimental to the comp?

I had a PC running all last winter in a shed down to -14C capturing
video from a wildlife camera. Along with the Linksys wireless router,
configured as a wifi repeater, it worked perfectly, rather to my
surprise.

I don't think there would be any doubt that operating in a more benign
environment would be more likely to make stuff last longer though.

Colin

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
 
Old 11-11-2011, 01:57 PM
"compdoc"
 
Default computers and cold temperatures

>IS it a bad thing to have a computer operating, say, in a garage during
>the cold winters?

I have a couple of servers running 24/7 in the garage, here in Denver. Have
done for a couple of years now.

It's great when winter comes - it's cold in the garage, and the servers
don't mind at all. In fact they help provide a little warmth in there.

Any electronics are going to maintain a certain temperature by running,
computers especially. As long as there is no ice or water involved, I see no
problems with it.

Dealing with heat in summer is worse than the cold in winter.



--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
 
Old 11-11-2011, 02:00 PM
Colin Law
 
Default computers and cold temperatures

On 11 November 2011 14:57, compdoc <compdoc@hotrodpc.com> wrote:
>>IS it a bad thing to have a computer operating, say, in a garage during
>>the cold winters?

> [snip]
> Dealing with heat in summer is worse than the cold in winter.

I think that might rather depend on where you are in the world.

Colin

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
 
Old 11-11-2011, 02:11 PM
Gilles Gravier
 
Default computers and cold temperatures

Hi!

On 11/11/2011 16:00, Colin Law wrote:

On 11 November 2011 14:57, compdoc<compdoc@hotrodpc.com> wrote:

IS it a bad thing to have a computer operating, say, in a garage during
the cold winters?

[snip]
Dealing with heat in summer is worse than the cold in winter.

I think that might rather depend on where you are in the world.


Actually, it is GOOGLE who did a study on computer failure rates in
warmer temperatures, and they found that hard disks, in particular, tend
to faire better around 35-45C, which is well above the normally
prescribed datacenter temperature of 20C. Have a look at :
http://static.googleusercontent.com/external_content/untrusted_dlcp/labs.google.com/en//papers/disk_failures.pdf,
in particular section 3.4 (temperature).


My guess is that at colder temperatures, lubricants tend to become less
fluid, and more viscous, thus requireing more energy to move parts
(rotate disks, move arms/heads) and that results in higher failure rates.


The rest of the machine, if properly cooled, can operate just as
reliably at 40C as it does at 20C (provided individual component
temperatures don't reach too high temps).


So operating a properly ventilated machine in warm summer weather is
probably much safer than in cold winter temperatures.


Gilles

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
 
Old 11-11-2011, 02:40 PM
Colin Law
 
Default computers and cold temperatures

On 11 November 2011 15:11, Gilles Gravier <ggravier@fsfe.org> wrote:
> Hi!
>
> On 11/11/2011 16:00, Colin Law wrote:
>>
>> On 11 November 2011 14:57, compdoc<compdoc@hotrodpc.com> *wrote:
>>>>
>>>> IS it a bad thing to have a computer operating, say, in a garage during
>>>> the cold winters?
>>>
>>> [snip]
>>> Dealing with heat in summer is worse than the cold in winter.
>>
>> I think that might rather depend on where you are in the world.
>
> Actually, it is GOOGLE who did a study on computer failure rates in warmer
> temperatures, and they found that hard disks, in particular, tend to faire
> better around 35-45C, which is well above the normally prescribed
> datacenter temperature of 20C. Have a look at :
> http://static.googleusercontent.com/external_content/untrusted_dlcp/labs.google.com/en//papers/disk_failures.pdf,
> in particular section 3.4 (temperature).

Not necessarily disagreeing, but my reading of that is that the
temperatures are *drive* temperatures not *ambient*. So a room
temperature of 20C will give air temperature inside the box rather
more that this and the drive will be warmer again.

Colin

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
 
Old 11-11-2011, 03:55 PM
Gilles Gravier
 
Default computers and cold temperatures

Hi!

On 11/11/2011 16:40, Colin Law wrote:

On 11 November 2011 15:11, Gilles Gravier<ggravier@fsfe.org> wrote:

On 11/11/2011 16:00, Colin Law wrote:

On 11 November 2011 14:57, compdoc<compdoc@hotrodpc.com> wrote:

IS it a bad thing to have a computer operating, say, in a garage during
the cold winters?

[snip]
Dealing with heat in summer is worse than the cold in winter.

I think that might rather depend on where you are in the world.

Actually, it is GOOGLE who did a study on computer failure rates in warmer
temperatures, and they found that hard disks, in particular, tend to faire
better around 35-45C, which is well above the normally prescribed
datacenter temperature of 20C. Have a look at :
http://static.googleusercontent.com/external_content/untrusted_dlcp/labs.google.com/en//papers/disk_failures.pdf,
in particular section 3.4 (temperature).

Not necessarily disagreeing, but my reading of that is that the
temperatures are *drive* temperatures not *ambient*. So a room
temperature of 20C will give air temperature inside the box rather
more that this and the drive will be warmer again.
True, but drives in properly cooled bays tend to be very close to room
temp. (If the heat sinks are good - i.e. not in your typical desktop PC.)


Gilles.

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
 
Old 11-11-2011, 04:18 PM
Bill Stanley
 
Default computers and cold temperatures

Actually, it is GOOGLE who did a study on computer failure rates in
warmer temperatures, and they found that hard disks, in particular, tend
to faire better around 35-45C, which is well above the normally
prescribed datacenter temperature of 20C. Have a look at :
http://static.googleusercontent.com/external_content/untrusted_dlcp/labs.google.com/en//papers/disk_failures.pdf,
in particular section 3.4 (temperature).

My guess is that at colder temperatures, lubricants tend to become less
fluid, and more viscous, thus requireing more energy to move parts
(rotate disks, move arms/heads) and that results in higher failure rates.

The rest of the machine, if properly cooled, can operate just as
reliably at 40C as it does at 20C (provided individual component
temperatures don't reach too high temps).

So operating a properly ventilated machine in warm summer weather is
probably much safer than in cold winter temperatures.


I am just being a devils advocate here and not implying that you are
wrong about the cold temperature. Why is it that a technique for
recovering data from a bad hard drive is to put it into a freezer?

This seems to imply that cold temperatures are not so bad for hard drives.

Bill Stanley

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
 
Old 11-11-2011, 04:22 PM
"compdoc"
 
Default computers and cold temperatures

>Why is it that a technique for
>recovering data from a bad hard drive is to put it into a freezer?
>This seems to imply that cold temperatures are not so bad for
>hard drives.


Some say that's has worked for them. I think it's more like wishful thinking
with a bit of voodoo thrown in...




--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
 

Thread Tools




All times are GMT. The time now is 05:57 AM.

VBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2007, Crawlability, Inc.
Copyright 2007 - 2008, www.linux-archive.org