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Old 10-30-2011, 11:21 AM
Linux Tyro
 
Default understanding partitioning

Hi,

I really have installed Ubuntu LTS and everything is working fine here on my PC. Just as a matter of interest, I have the following to be asked (very frankly), at first declaring that I really don't know anything regarding it.




About how really partitioning works, in fact what exactly it is! Just installed the Ubuntu LTS on my machine (now the system is dual booted with Ubuntu LTS & Windows XP). Please if someone has some time (definitely people would have it, somehow, somewhere, could elaborate me (in details)) in simple language about all that or give me the link where in very simple language I could understand all those fuzzy things (which home users need not look). These include:




- What are these partitions sda1, 2, 3, ....how to know if ubuntu is sda1 or sda2 or what and is it different from /home....?
- When I installed ubuntu 10.04 LTS, it got installed and that partition is sda1/2/3/4/5 ...and upto where does this go...?



-LVM yet another thing, is related with what...? It is (also) a partition or what....? It is sda...?
- Mounting a partition means what, what exactly we are going to do with that partition after mounting it and before mounting, was it in existence?



Thx.
--
Two atoms are walking along. Suddenly, one stops. The other says, "What's

wrong?" "I've lost an electron." "Are you sure?" "I'm positive!"


================================================== =
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Old 10-30-2011, 11:22 AM
Linux Tyro
 
Default understanding partitioning

On Sun, Oct 30, 2011 at 5:51 PM, Linux Tyro <ubuntu.bkn@gmail.com> wrote:


I really have installed Ubuntu LTS and everything is working fine here on my PC. Just as a matter of interest, I have the following to be asked (very frankly), at first declaring that I really don't know anything regarding it.


Update: I have installed 32 bit version but downloading the 64 bit. (just for information).
--
Two atoms are walking along. Suddenly, one stops. The other says, "What's


wrong?" "I've lost an electron." "Are you sure?" "I'm positive!"


================================================== =
Ubuntu LTS is good!

================================================== =


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Old 10-30-2011, 12:04 PM
Avi Greenbury
 
Default understanding partitioning

Linux Tyro wrote:

> About how really partitioning works, in fact what exactly it is!

Basically, partitioning is a way of partitioning off a hard drive into
separate areas. Much as you might divide up a warehouse into areas to
keep distinct sorts of stock in, you can divide up hard drives in the
same way.

A hard drive is basically a large area of storage, which
allows the computer to set bits of it to values either of 1 or 0. This,
fundamentally, is how the files are stored on the system. But files
have more than just data - they have things like names, and modified
dates and permissions. We therefore tend to use a filesystem on a
drive.

A filesystem basically sets out a standard for the way files are
to be stored on a drive - how the filename is stored and linked to the
file, and how the permissions work. Common filesystems in Windows are
NTFS and FAT, and Linux tends to use ext3 or ext4. The actual mechanics
of how they work isn't particularly important, but the reason that,
say, Windows needs a different partition to Linux us because Windows
assumes NTFS's way of storing permissions and other file data, and
Linux assumes ext's. [0] You would, therefore, put Windows on an NTFS
filesystem in one partition, and Ubuntu on an ext filesystem in another.

> - What are these partitions sda1, 2, 3, ....how to know if ubuntu is
> sda1 or sda2 or what and is it different from /home....?
> - When I installed ubuntu 10.04 LTS, it got installed and that
> partition is sda1/2/3/4/5 ...and upto where does this go...?

In contrast to Window's way of exposing hard drives with drive letters,
Linux lets you 'mount' any drive at any directory. To 'mount' a drive
is to make it available under a directory. If you had a big disk full
of music, for example, you might wish to mount it under the directory
'music' in your home directory, then you just go into that directory to
access the files on the disk.

/dev/ is a directory in which devices are 'kept'. To mount a drive, you
need to specify which device you want mounted (using its /dev address)
and which directory you want it mounted on.

/dev isn't reserved for disk drives, though. Disk drives generally
start /dev/sd nowadays.

/dev/sda is the first drive, /sdv/sdb the second and so on.

The partitons are then themselves denoted by letters:

/dev/sda1 is the first partition on the first drive, /dev/sda4 the
fourth. You cannot actually *do* anything to the drives with these
addresses - if you want to get at the files on them you need to
instruct Linux to mount them first. Fortunately, it probably already
has.

I'm not aware of a graphical way to investigate what's mounted on the
computer, though I'm sure there is one, but you can get an idea if you
open a terminal (ctrl+alt+t) and then enter this text and hit enter:

mount

You will see several virtual drives mounted (ones with lines that don't
start '/dev/') but you should be able to pick out the ones that are
real-life drives. The lines are of the form:

/dev/sda6 on / type ext3 (rw,errors=remount-ro,commit=0)

This is /dev/sda6 (that is, the sixth partition of the first drive)
Mounted on / (that is, the 'root' directory, so it's where my operating
system is)
Of type ext3 (so the filesystem I'm using is ext3)

The bits in the brackets are options for mounting, which are likely to
be different, but are rather boring and irrelevant here anyway,


> -LVM yet another thing, is related with what...? It is (also) a
> partition or what....? It is sda...?

LVM is rather more complicated, at least until you're happy with
partitions and mounting and the like. Unless you've need to know and
use it shortly, it would be beneficial to get quite comfortable with
filesystems, partitions and the like before exploring LVM.

Put simply, though, it provides a means of effectively having
partitions whose sizes can be changed while they're in use - generally
without LVM this is not possible.

> - Mounting a partition means what, what exactly we are going to do
> with that partition after mounting it and before mounting, was it in
> existence?

We speak of mounting drive at directories, and you make the contents
of the drive appear as the contents of the directory. Any previous
contents of that directory still exist, but are inaccessible while the
drive is mounted.

--
Avi


[0] More properly, it assumes whichever you've told it to use, but
Ubuntu uses ext4 by default, so I've assumed you're using that.

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Old 10-30-2011, 12:25 PM
Linux Tyro
 
Default understanding partitioning

On Sun, Oct 30, 2011 at 6:34 PM, Avi Greenbury <lists@avi.co> wrote:


Linux Tyro wrote:



> About how really partitioning works, in fact what exactly it is!



Basically, partitioning is a way of partitioning off a hard drive into

separate areas. Much as you might divide up a warehouse into areas to

keep distinct sorts of stock in, you can divide up hard drives in the

same way.



A hard drive is basically a large area of storage, which

allows the computer to set bits of it to values either of 1 or 0. This,

fundamentally, is how the files are stored on the system. But files

have more than just data - they have things like names, and modified

dates and permissions. We therefore tend to use a filesystem on a

drive.



A filesystem basically sets out a standard for the way files are

to be stored on a drive - how the filename is stored and linked to the

file, and how the permissions work. Common filesystems in Windows are

NTFS and FAT, and Linux tends to use ext3 or ext4. The actual mechanics

of how they work isn't particularly important, but the reason that,

say, Windows needs a different partition to Linux us because Windows

assumes NTFS's way of storing permissions and other file data, and

Linux assumes ext's. [0] You would, therefore, put Windows on an NTFS

filesystem in one partition, and Ubuntu on an ext filesystem in another.



> - What are these partitions sda1, 2, 3, ....how to know if ubuntu is

> sda1 or sda2 or what and is it different from /home....?

> - When I installed ubuntu 10.04 LTS, it got installed and that

> partition is sda1/2/3/4/5 ...and upto where does this go...?



In contrast to Window's way of exposing hard drives with drive letters,

Linux lets you 'mount' any drive at any directory. To 'mount' a drive

is to make it available under a directory. If you had a big disk full

of music, for example, you might wish to mount it under the directory

'music' in your home directory, then you just go into that directory to

access the files on the disk.



/dev/ is a directory in which devices are 'kept'. To mount a drive, you

need to specify which device you want mounted (using its /dev address)

and which directory you want it mounted on.



/dev isn't reserved for disk drives, though. Disk drives generally

start /dev/sd nowadays.



/dev/sda is the first drive, /sdv/sdb the second and so on.



The partitons are then themselves denoted by letters:



/dev/sda1 is the first partition on the first drive, /dev/sda4 the

fourth. You cannot actually *do* anything to the drives with these

addresses - if you want to get at the files on them you need to

instruct Linux to mount them first. Fortunately, it probably already

has.



I'm not aware of a graphical way to investigate what's mounted on the

computer, though I'm sure there is one, but you can get an idea if you

open a terminal (ctrl+alt+t) and then enter this text and hit enter:



mount



You will see several virtual drives mounted (ones with lines that don't

start '/dev/') but you should be able to pick out the ones that are

real-life drives. The lines are of the form:



/dev/sda6 on / type ext3 (rw,errors=remount-ro,commit=0)



This is /dev/sda6 (that is, the sixth partition of the first drive)

Mounted on / (that is, the 'root' directory, so it's where my operating

system is)

Of type ext3 (so the filesystem I'm using is ext3)



The bits in the brackets are options for mounting, which are likely to

be different, but are rather boring and irrelevant here anyway,





> -LVM yet another thing, is related with what...? It is (also) a

> partition or what....? It is sda...?



LVM is rather more complicated, at least until you're happy with

partitions and mounting and the like. Unless you've need to know and

use it shortly, it would be beneficial to get quite comfortable with

filesystems, partitions and the like before exploring LVM.



Put simply, though, it provides a means of effectively having

partitions whose sizes can be changed while they're in use - generally

without LVM this is not possible.



> - Mounting a partition means what, what exactly we are going to do

> with that partition after mounting it and before mounting, was it in

> existence?



We speak of mounting drive at directories, and you make the contents

of the drive appear as the contents of the directory. Any previous

contents of that directory still exist, but are inaccessible while the

drive is mounted.


Thanks a lot to you. I have just started reading all this from the first word where you started. Thx again.

--
Two atoms are walking along. Suddenly, one stops. The other says, "What's


wrong?" "I've lost an electron." "Are you sure?" "I'm positive!"


================================================== =
Ubuntu LTS is good!

================================================== =


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Old 10-30-2011, 03:47 PM
Linux Tyro
 
Default understanding partitioning

On Sun, Oct 30, 2011 at 6:34 PM, Avi Greenbury <lists@avi.co> wrote:


But files
have more than just data - they have things like names, and modified

dates and permissions. We therefore tend to use a filesystem on a

drive.

But those files which have names, etc.. that all are also stored in the form of '0' and '1' only?
*



A filesystem basically sets out a standard for the way files are

to be stored on a drive - how the filename is stored and linked to the

file, and how the permissions work. Common filesystems in Windows are

NTFS and FAT, and Linux tends to use ext3 or ext4. The actual mechanics

of how they work isn't particularly important, but the reason that,

say, Windows needs a different partition to Linux us because Windows

assumes NTFS's way of storing permissions and other file data, and

Linux assumes ext's. [0] You would, therefore, put Windows on an NTFS

filesystem in one partition, and Ubuntu on an ext filesystem in another.

Okay, but one exciting this is that from Linux, we can see the Windows, i.e. from ext 4 we can use NTFS systems but not vice-versa, is it like that?

*
In contrast to Window's way of exposing hard drives with drive letters,


Linux lets you 'mount' any drive at any directory. To 'mount' a drive

is to make it available under a directory. If you had a big disk full

of music, for example, you might wish to mount it under the directory

'music' in your home directory, then you just go into that directory to

access the files on the disk.



/dev/ is a directory in which devices are 'kept'. To mount a drive, you

need to specify which device you want mounted (using its /dev address)

and which directory you want it mounted on.

Devices means hard drive partitions or separate usb drives (external device(s))? To mount a drive, we need device name (like.../dev...?) [device means, partition name..?) to which we want to mount? And if we mount, we mount in a directory (no other possibility) and thus make it accessible such that by going to that directory, we can actually open and use it.., is it like that?

*

/dev isn't reserved for disk drives, though. Disk drives generally

start /dev/sd nowadays.

Didn't understand this, you are saying /dev isn't reserved for disk drives and then, now a days, starting from /dev/sd*...?
*


/dev/sda is the first drive, /sdv/sdb the second and so on.



The partitons are then themselves denoted by letters:



/dev/sda1 is the first partition on the first drive, /dev/sda4 the

fourth. You cannot actually *do* anything to the drives with these

addresses - if you want to get at the files on them you need to

instruct Linux to mount them first. Fortunately, it probably already

has.

Didn't get this... Please a little bit explain. Thx. If you say, I can post my output of any command (you tell me), if this way I can know!
*

I'm not aware of a graphical way to investigate what's mounted on the

computer, though I'm sure there is one, but you can get an idea if you

open a terminal (ctrl+alt+t) and then enter this text and hit enter:



mount



You will see several virtual drives mounted (ones with lines that don't

start '/dev/') but you should be able to pick out the ones that are

real-life drives. The lines are of the form:



/dev/sda6 on / type ext3 (rw,errors=remount-ro,commit=0)



This is /dev/sda6 (that is, the sixth partition of the first drive)

Mounted on / (that is, the 'root' directory, so it's where my operating

system is)

Of type ext3 (so the filesystem I'm using is ext3)



The bits in the brackets are options for mounting, which are likely to

be different, but are rather boring and irrelevant here anyway,





> -LVM yet another thing, is related with what...? It is (also) a

> partition or what....? It is sda...?



LVM is rather more complicated, at least until you're happy with

partitions and mounting and the like. Unless you've need to know and

use it shortly, it would be beneficial to get quite comfortable with

filesystems, partitions and the like before exploring LVM.

Correct, LVM, I am forgetting right now.
*

We speak of mounting drive at directories, and you make the contents

of the drive appear as the contents of the directory. Any previous

contents of that directory still exist, but are inaccessible while the

drive is mounted.

Inaccessible while the drive is unmounted or mounted?


--
Two atoms are walking along. Suddenly, one stops. The other says, "What's

wrong?" "I've lost an electron." "Are you sure?" "I'm positive!"


================================================== =
Ubuntu LTS is good!

================================================== =


--
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ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
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Old 10-30-2011, 10:51 PM
Chris Jeffries
 
Default understanding partitioning

But files have more than just data - they have things like names, and modified
dates and permissions. We therefore tend to use a filesystem on a
drive.


But those files which have names, etc.. that all are also stored in the form of '0' and '1' only?
*

A filesystem basically sets out a standard for the way files are
to be stored on a drive - how the filename is stored and linked to the
file, and how the permissions work. Common filesystems in Windows are
NTFS and FAT, and Linux tends to use ext3 or ext4. The actual mechanics

of how they work isn't particularly important, but the reason that,
say, Windows needs a different partition to Linux us because Windows
assumes NTFS's way of storing permissions and other file data, and

Linux assumes ext's. [0] You would, therefore, put Windows on an NTFS
filesystem in one partition, and Ubuntu on an ext filesystem in another.

Okay, but one exciting this is that from Linux, we can see the Windows, i.e. from ext 4 we can use NTFS systems but not vice-versa, is it like that?

*

In contrast to Window's way of exposing hard drives with drive letters,
Linux lets you 'mount' any drive at any directory. To 'mount' a drive
is to make it available under a directory. If you had a big disk full

of music, for example, you might wish to mount it under the directory
'music' in your home directory, then you just go into that directory to
access the files on the disk.

/dev/ is a directory in which devices are 'kept'. To mount a drive, you

need to specify which device you want mounted (using its /dev address)
and which directory you want it mounted on.

Devices means hard drive partitions or separate usb drives (external device(s))? To mount a drive, we need device name (like.../dev...?) [device means, partition name..?) to which we want to mount? And if we mount, we mount in a directory (no other possibility) and thus make it accessible such that by going to that directory, we can actually open and use it.., is it like that?

*
/dev isn't reserved for disk drives, though. Disk drives generally
start /dev/sd nowadays.

Didn't understand this, you are saying /dev isn't reserved for disk drives and then, now a days, starting from /dev/sd*...?

*
/dev/sda is the first drive, /sdv/sdb the second and so on.

The partitons are then themselves denoted by letters:

/dev/sda1 is the first partition on the first drive, /dev/sda4 the
fourth. You cannot actually *do* anything to the drives with these

addresses - if you want to get at the files on them you need to
instruct Linux to mount them first. Fortunately, it probably already
has.

Didn't get this... Please a little bit explain. Thx. If you say, I can post my output of any command (you tell me), if this way I can know!

*
I'm not aware of a graphical way to investigate what's mounted on the
computer, though I'm sure there is one, but you can get an idea if you
open a terminal (ctrl+alt+t) and then enter this text and hit enter:


mount

You will see several virtual drives mounted (ones with lines that don't
start '/dev/') but you should be able to pick out the ones that are
real-life drives. The lines are of the form:


/dev/sda6 on / type ext3 (rw,errors=remount-ro,commit=0)

This is /dev/sda6 (that is, the sixth partition of the first drive)
Mounted on / (that is, the 'root' directory, so it's where my operating

system is)
Of type ext3 (so the filesystem I'm using is ext3)

The bits in the brackets are options for mounting, which are likely to
be different, but are rather boring and irrelevant here anyway,



> -LVM yet another thing, is related with what...? It is (also) a
> partition or what....? It is sda...?

LVM is rather more complicated, at least until you're happy with
partitions and mounting and the like. Unless you've need to know and

use it shortly, it would be beneficial to get quite comfortable with
filesystems, partitions and the like before exploring LVM.

Correct, LVM, I am forgetting right now.
*

We speak of mounting drive at directories, and you make the contents
of the drive appear as the contents of the directory. Any previous
contents of that directory still exist, but are inaccessible while the
drive is mounted.


Inaccessible while the drive is unmounted or mounted?

EXT drivers are available for Windows. I used them in the past. No recognition of permissions etc.then but the data was readable and writable. Thing.s may be even better now

http://www.soluvas.com/read-browse-explore-open-ext2-ext3-ext4-partition-filesystem-from-windows-7/

but there are others, google 'ext4 windows'
For example, read*

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Old 10-31-2011, 12:33 PM
"Amedee Van Gasse"
 
Default understanding partitioning

On Sun, October 30, 2011 17:47, Linux Tyro wrote:
> On Sun, Oct 30, 2011 at 6:34 PM, Avi Greenbury <lists@avi.co> wrote:
>
> But files have more than just data - they have things like names, and
>> modified
>> dates and permissions. We therefore tend to use a filesystem on a
>> drive.
>>
>
> But those files which have names, etc.. that all are also stored in the
> form
> of '0' and '1' only?

Yes.

>> A filesystem basically sets out a standard for the way files are
>> to be stored on a drive - how the filename is stored and linked to the
>> file, and how the permissions work. Common filesystems in Windows are
>> NTFS and FAT, and Linux tends to use ext3 or ext4. The actual mechanics
>> of how they work isn't particularly important, but the reason that,
>> say, Windows needs a different partition to Linux us because Windows
>> assumes NTFS's way of storing permissions and other file data, and
>> Linux assumes ext's. [0] You would, therefore, put Windows on an NTFS
>> filesystem in one partition, and Ubuntu on an ext filesystem in another.
>>
>
> Okay, but one exciting this is that from Linux, we can see the Windows,
> i.e.
> from ext 4 we can use NTFS systems but not vice-versa, is it like that?

Yes.
Think of FAT, NTFS, ext3 and ext4 as languages.

Windows' mother language is NTFS. It also knows one other language that it
used to speak in the past: FAT. Windows does not want to learn other
languages, because he feels soooo important and because he never leaves
his country, so why should het learn other languages?

Linux's mother language is ext. It comes in 3 different dialects: ext2,
ext3, ext4. But Linux is a polyglot and travels all over the world. It has
over the years learned to speak lots of other languages: Reiser, XFS, JFS,
btrfs, and even Windows' NTFS and FAT.

>> In contrast to Window's way of exposing hard drives with drive letters,
>> Linux lets you 'mount' any drive at any directory. To 'mount' a drive
>> is to make it available under a directory. If you had a big disk full
>> of music, for example, you might wish to mount it under the directory
>> 'music' in your home directory, then you just go into that directory to
>> access the files on the disk.
>>
>> /dev/ is a directory in which devices are 'kept'. To mount a drive, you
>> need to specify which device you want mounted (using its /dev address)
>> and which directory you want it mounted on.
>>
>
> Devices means hard drive partitions or separate usb drives (external
> device(s))?

Devices has multiple meanings.
It's physical devices: the actual things that you can hit with a hammer.
And logical devices: an abstract concept that is used by Linux.
Partitions are logical devices that are made "on top of" physical devices
(drives).

Actually, software that runs on top of Linux only talks to logical
devices, and the Linux kernel translates this to the actual physical
devices. And vice versa.

> To mount a drive, we need device name (like.../dev...?)
> [device
> means, partition name..?) to which we want to mount? And if we mount, we
> mount in a directory (no other possibility) and thus make it accessible
> such
> that by going to that directory, we can actually open and use it.., is it
> like that?

Yes.

>> /dev isn't reserved for disk drives, though. Disk drives generally
>> start /dev/sd nowadays.
>>
>
> Didn't understand this, you are saying /dev isn't reserved for disk drives
> and then, now a days, starting from /dev/sd*...?

"/dev/" isn't used.

>> /dev/sda is the first drive, /sdv/sdb the second and so on.
>>
>> The partitons are then themselves denoted by letters:

I think he meant numbers.

>> /dev/sda1 is the first partition on the first drive, /dev/sda4 the
>> fourth. You cannot actually *do* anything to the drives with these
>> addresses - if you want to get at the files on them you need to
>> instruct Linux to mount them first. Fortunately, it probably already
>> has.
>>
>
> Didn't get this... Please a little bit explain. Thx. If you say, I can
> post
> my output of any command (you tell me), if this way I can know!

A few paragraphs ago you understood it already?

Look, you put a hard disk in a computer.

Linux calls the hard disk "/dev/sda", or just "sda" if you don't want to
type everything. With a letter a because it is the first disk. The second
disk would be "/dev/sdb", the third "/dev/sdc" and so on.
You partition sda.

First partition is /dev/sda1. Second partition is /dev/sda2. And so on.
Do you really NEED partitions? No. But it is good practice to make a
/dev/sda1 partition anyway, even if it is the only partition.

So now you have /dev/sda1, /dev/sda2, /dev/sdb1, /dev/sdb2 and so on. You
cannot yet "use" them = make them available in the filesystem so programs
know where to write. This is called mounting. Just like mounting a horse:
you cannot ride a horse if you haven't mounted it.

So you say, dear Linux, please mount this device on that directory:
mount /dev/sdb1 /media/music

Now you can copy your entire music collection to the directory /media/music.

>> I'm not aware of a graphical way to investigate what's mounted on the
>> computer, though I'm sure there is one, but you can get an idea if you
>> open a terminal (ctrl+alt+t) and then enter this text and hit enter:
>>
>> mount
>>
>> You will see several virtual drives mounted (ones with lines that don't
>> start '/dev/') but you should be able to pick out the ones that are
>> real-life drives. The lines are of the form:
>>
>> /dev/sda6 on / type ext3 (rw,errors=remount-ro,commit=0)
>>
>> This is /dev/sda6 (that is, the sixth partition of the first drive)
>> Mounted on / (that is, the 'root' directory, so it's where my operating
>> system is)
>> Of type ext3 (so the filesystem I'm using is ext3)
>>
>> The bits in the brackets are options for mounting, which are likely to
>> be different, but are rather boring and irrelevant here anyway,
>>
>>
>> > -LVM yet another thing, is related with what...? It is (also) a
>> > partition or what....? It is sda...?
>>
>> LVM is rather more complicated, at least until you're happy with
>> partitions and mounting and the like. Unless you've need to know and
>> use it shortly, it would be beneficial to get quite comfortable with
>> filesystems, partitions and the like before exploring LVM.
>>
>
> Correct, LVM, I am forgetting right now.

Good idea.

>> We speak of mounting drive at directories, and you make the contents
>> of the drive appear as the contents of the directory. Any previous
>> contents of that directory still exist, but are inaccessible while the
>> drive is mounted.
>> <https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users>
>>
>
> Inaccessible while the drive is unmounted or mounted?

unmounted = inaccessible
mounted = accessible


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Old 10-31-2011, 12:35 PM
"Amedee Van Gasse"
 
Default understanding partitioning

On Mon, October 31, 2011 00:51, Chris Jeffries wrote:

> EXT drivers are available for Windows. I used them in the past. No
> recognition of permissions etc.then but the data was readable and
> writable.
> Thing.s may be even better now
>
> http://www.soluvas.com/read-browse-explore-open-ext2-ext3-ext4-partition-filesystem-from-windows-7/
>
> but there are others, google 'ext4 windows'

Just like LVM, I would not recommend this to someone who is still learning
about filesystems and partitions.


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Old 10-31-2011, 12:45 PM
Linux Tyro
 
Default understanding partitioning

On Mon, Oct 31, 2011 at 7:05 PM, Amedee Van Gasse <amedee-ubuntu@amedee.be> wrote:


Just like LVM, I would not recommend this to someone who is still learning

about filesystems and partitions.
I was neither able to go through that typical page!

--
Two atoms are walking along. Suddenly, one stops. The other says, "What's
wrong?" "I've lost an electron." "Are you sure?" "I'm positive!"======================================== ===========
Ubuntu LTS is good!============================================= ======


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Old 10-31-2011, 12:46 PM
Linux Tyro
 
Default understanding partitioning

On Mon, Oct 31, 2011 at 7:05 PM, Amedee Van Gasse <amedee-ubuntu@amedee.be> wrote:


Just like LVM, I would not recommend this to someone who is still learning

about filesystems and partitions.
I just get some legs weight and then can try other things, as if now, only small small things...
--
Two atoms are walking along. Suddenly, one stops. The other says, "What's
wrong?" "I've lost an electron." "Are you sure?" "I'm positive!"======================================== ===========
Ubuntu LTS is good!============================================= ======


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