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Old 09-24-2011, 09:13 PM
Doug
 
Default I've messed something up now

On 09/24/2011 09:22 AM, Cybe R. Wizard wrote:

On Sat, 24 Sep 2011 00:28:53 -0400
Doug<dmcgarrett@optonline.net> wrote:


Did you ever have sudo working? Some distros don't put you into the
sudoers file--you have to do it yourself. To
edit the sudoers file, you should invoke visudo, as root

If use of sudo is missing and the root account is, by default, not
enabled, how, then, run visudo /as root/?

Cybe R. Wizard

You type su root in the CLI. Then your password, when asked.
When you do that, you will remain using root permissions until
you remember to type exit. But if you use sudo, you only have
root privileges for the one command. This is so you *don't*
accidentally enter some command that will destroy your system.

Of course, this all assumes that you are the admin of the system,
which you surely are if you installed it yourself.

--doug

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Old 09-24-2011, 10:12 PM
Ric Moore
 
Default I've messed something up now

On 09/24/2011 07:05 AM, Avi Greenbury wrote:

Doug wrote:
isudo uses vi

syntax, so check on the vi commands to save and exit the file.


Visudo uses the $VISUAL envionment variable to decide which editor to
use; I think on Ubuntu that's nano by default.



Thank God they kept Pico alive. I almost miss using pine. Ric



--
My father, Victor Moore (Vic) used to say:
"There are two Great Sins in the world...
..the Sin of Ignorance, and the Sin of Stupidity.
Only the former may be overcome." R.I.P. Dad.
http://linuxcounter.net/user/44256.html

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Old 09-24-2011, 10:23 PM
Rashkae
 
Default I've messed something up now

On 09/24/2011 06:12 PM, Ric Moore wrote:

On 09/24/2011 07:05 AM, Avi Greenbury wrote:

Doug wrote:
isudo uses vi

syntax, so check on the vi commands to save and exit the file.


Visudo uses the $VISUAL envionment variable to decide which editor to
use; I think on Ubuntu that's nano by default.



Thank God they kept Pico alive. I almost miss using pine. Ric



In case you ever find yourself wanting a console based mail client
that's a bit friendlier than mutt, Pine is now Alpine



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Old 09-24-2011, 11:47 PM
Knute Johnson
 
Default I've messed something up now

On 9/24/2011 6:34 AM, Rashkae wrote:

On 09/23/2011 11:54 PM, Knute Johnson wrote:

I'm getting a message when I try to sudo that I'm not in the sudoers
file. Any idea what I've done and how to fix it?

Thanks,



Without more information, I suspect that when you added yourself to the
"camera" group (in your previous thread)
you did something like usermod -G camera, which would have effectively
destroyed your group membership and replaced it with Camera. (You have
to use the -a switch with usermod when adding a user to a group. A very
unfortunately poorly thought out command.)

As to how to fix, you need to reboot to a root shell. When booting your
system, activate the grub menu (I believe that is now done by holding
the shift key when grub first starts up.) From the menu, choose the
rescue or failsafe boot option. You should then, at some point, be given
the choice to boot into a root shell. From there, you can use
/usr/sbin/usermod -a -G admin username to give yourself sudo permissions
again.


Rashkae:

Thanks very much, you diagnosed that one perfectly. I would have had no
clue how to do that.


Thanks again,

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Old 09-25-2011, 01:32 AM
Rashkae
 
Default I've messed something up now

On 09/24/2011 07:47 PM, Knute Johnson wrote:


Rashkae:

Thanks very much, you diagnosed that one perfectly. I would have had
no clue how to do that.


Thanks again,



A default user in Ubuntu is assigned to several groups during install.
Ubuntu permissions can be a hodgepodge of Group permissions, policykit
and policykit-2, so it's hard to guess what will have adverse effects.
Unfortunately, my current desktop is not Ubuntu, so I can't verify, but
as of the last LTS, the default user is also a member of the following
groups:


username (this is the same as your actual username)
adm
dialout
cdrom
plugdev
lpadmin
admin (you should laready have this one restored)
sambashare



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Old 09-25-2011, 01:55 AM
Liam Proven
 
Default I've messed something up now

On 24 September 2011 22:13, Doug <dmcgarrett@optonline.net> wrote:
> On 09/24/2011 09:22 AM, Cybe R. Wizard wrote:
>>
>> On Sat, 24 Sep 2011 00:28:53 -0400
>> Doug<dmcgarrett@optonline.net> *wrote:
>>
>>> Did you ever have sudo working? *Some distros don't put you into the
>>> sudoers file--you have to do it yourself. *To
>>> edit the sudoers file, you should invoke visudo, as root
>>
>> If use of sudo is missing and the root account is, by default, not
>> enabled, how, then, run visudo /as root/?
>
> You type su root in the CLI. *Then your password, when asked.
> When you do that, you will remain using root permissions until
> you remember to type exit. *But if you use sudo, you only have
> root privileges for the one command. *This is so you *don't*
> accidentally enter some command that will destroy your system.
>
> Of course, this all assumes that you are the admin of the system,
> which you surely are if you installed it yourself.

If there is no "sudo" command, then you don't need "su root", just

su

... and you become root by giving the root password, assuming you have
one and you know what it is.

If sudo *is* present and you don't have a root account, then you can
become root for the rest of the session with:

sudo -s

... and giving *your own* password - that is, if you're an admin.

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Email: lproven@cix.co.uk • GMail/GoogleTalk/Orkut: lproven@gmail.com
Tel: +44 20-8685-0498 • Cell: +44 7939-087884 • Fax: + 44 870-9151419
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Old 09-26-2011, 05:01 PM
Knute Johnson
 
Default I've messed something up now

On 9/24/2011 6:32 PM, Rashkae wrote:

On 09/24/2011 07:47 PM, Knute Johnson wrote:


Rashkae:

Thanks very much, you diagnosed that one perfectly. I would have had
no clue how to do that.

Thanks again,



A default user in Ubuntu is assigned to several groups during install.
Ubuntu permissions can be a hodgepodge of Group permissions, policykit
and policykit-2, so it's hard to guess what will have adverse effects.
Unfortunately, my current desktop is not Ubuntu, so I can't verify, but
as of the last LTS, the default user is also a member of the following
groups:

username (this is the same as your actual username)
adm
dialout
cdrom
plugdev
lpadmin
admin (you should laready have this one restored)
sambashare




I've added myself to those groups as well. Is there a config file
somewhere that lists all of the groups that the default user is
assigned? I didn't look before I added myself to the groups to see if
they existed before that. The usermod command won't create a group will it?


Thanks very much,

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Old 09-26-2011, 05:14 PM
Rashkae
 
Default I've messed something up now

On 09/26/2011 01:01 PM, Knute Johnson wrote:




I've added myself to those groups as well. Is there a config file
somewhere that lists all of the groups that the default user is
assigned? I didn't look before I added myself to the groups to see if
they existed before that. The usermod command won't create a group
will it?


Thanks very much,

Sorry, I don't know where Ubuntu stores the script that is used to
create the first user during install. But no, usermod does not create
groups. (At least, not with the -a -G options.)




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Old 09-26-2011, 06:02 PM
Firesam
 
Default I've messed something up now

On Mon, 2011-09-26 at 10:01 -0700, Knute Johnson wrote:
> On 9/24/2011 6:32 PM, Rashkae wrote:
> > On 09/24/2011 07:47 PM, Knute Johnson wrote:
> >>
> >> Rashkae:
> >>
> >> Thanks very much, you diagnosed that one perfectly. I would have had
> >> no clue how to do that.
> >>
> >> Thanks again,
> >>
> >
> > A default user in Ubuntu is assigned to several groups during install.
> > Ubuntu permissions can be a hodgepodge of Group permissions, policykit
> > and policykit-2, so it's hard to guess what will have adverse effects.
> > Unfortunately, my current desktop is not Ubuntu, so I can't verify, but
> > as of the last LTS, the default user is also a member of the following
> > groups:
> >
> > username (this is the same as your actual username)
> > adm
> > dialout
> > cdrom
> > plugdev
> > lpadmin
> > admin (you should laready have this one restored)
> > sambashare
> >
>
>
> I've added myself to those groups as well. Is there a config file
> somewhere that lists all of the groups that the default user is
> assigned? I didn't look before I added myself to the groups to see if
> they existed before that. The usermod command won't create a group will it?
>
> Thanks very much,
>
> --
>
> Knute Johnson
>
If you are using gui you can go to users and groups and add a user to
see all the defaults you would normally have on your system.


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Old 09-26-2011, 11:50 PM
Knute Johnson
 
Default I've messed something up now

On 9/26/2011 11:02 AM, Firesam wrote:

If you are using gui you can go to users and groups and add a user to
see all the defaults you would normally have on your system.


Thanks for that thought but it is a server installation, no GUI.

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