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Old 02-13-2008, 08:18 PM
"Devon Harding"
 
Default Ubuntu Server & VMware

I've just set up Ubuntu Server 7.10 & VMware Server.* I want to disable unneeded services in Ubuntu to maximize the performance of VMware, whats the best way to go about that?

-Devon







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Old 02-13-2008, 08:58 PM
Vincent Trouilliez
 
Default Ubuntu Server & VMware

On Wed, 13 Feb 2008 22:30:17 +0100
Vincent Trouilliez <vincent.trouilliez@modulonet.fr> wrote:

> > I've just set up Ubuntu Server 7.10 & VMware Server. I want to disable
> > unneeded services in Ubuntu to maximize the performance of VMware, whats the
> > best way to go about that?
>
> It can be done on the command line obviously, but I don't remember the
> command name(s). I use "bum" instead, a convenient GUI. It's in the
> "universe" repository.

Forgot that you were using Ubuntu server, so maybe you didn't install a
GUI. Still, I remember trying a command line program with anice ncurses
UI, might even be installed by default... but I don't recall the name
of it !

Someone will no doubt come up with the name of that convenient program,
hopefully.

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Old 02-13-2008, 09:14 PM
Vincent Trouilliez
 
Default Ubuntu Server & VMware

On Wed, 13 Feb 2008 22:58:25 +0100
Vincent Trouilliez <vincent.trouilliez@modulonet.fr> wrote:
> Someone will no doubt come up with the name of that convenient program,
> hopefully.

Okay, I just found it eventually !

The program is called "sysv-rc-conf" and is in the package (in Universe
repo, not Main) of the same name.

However, I just come to think that Ubuntu now uses "Upstart", which I
believe replaces Sysv, so I am not sure if using old sysv tools is
still a safe/reliable thing to do. Hopefully someone who knows what he
is talking about, will shed some light ;-)

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Old 02-13-2008, 09:19 PM
"Joris Dobbelsteen"
 
Default Ubuntu Server & VMware

*




From: ubuntu-users-bounces@lists.ubuntu.com
[mailto:ubuntu-users-bounces@lists.ubuntu.com] On Behalf Of Devon
Harding
Sent: Wednesday, 13 February 2008 22:19
To: Ubuntu
user technical support,not for general discussions
Subject: Ubuntu
Server & VMware



I've just set up Ubuntu Server 7.10 & VMware
Server.* I want to disable unneeded services in Ubuntu to maximize the
performance of VMware, whats the best way to go about that?
*
Review what is installed "dpkg --list" and
remove what you KNOW you don't need. Another place to start is /etc/init.d to
see directory what services are installed.
*
In practice I believe you will only gain
very minimal improvements by disabling services. I would do this only from a
security point of view or when the server is actually maximally loaded (when you
should rather consider upgrading).**
VMWare takes*quite a performance impact
from virtualizing hardware. So ensure you:


Use VMWare drivers, as they can 'avoid' using hardware emulation and
take a more efficient route.

Reduce requirements for hardware resources. Make sure you have
sufficient memory for caching.
Also monitor system load and performance. Ensure
you don't spends hours on winning virtually nothing.
*
If your virtualizing only Linux, you could
attempt the Xen route, which makes use of paravirtualizaiton, avoiding the
hardware emulation steps. In all cases, you will pay for virtualization. Only
the price varies.
*
- Joris
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Old 02-13-2008, 09:24 PM
Rich Rudnick
 
Default Ubuntu Server & VMware

Vincent Trouilliez wrote:
> On Wed, 13 Feb 2008 22:58:25 +0100
> Vincent Trouilliez <vincent.trouilliez@modulonet.fr> wrote:
>> Someone will no doubt come up with the name of that convenient program,
>> hopefully.
>
> Okay, I just found it eventually !
>
> The program is called "sysv-rc-conf" and is in the package (in Universe
> repo, not Main) of the same name.
>
> However, I just come to think that Ubuntu now uses "Upstart", which I
> believe replaces Sysv, so I am not sure if using old sysv tools is
> still a safe/reliable thing to do. Hopefully someone who knows what he
> is talking about, will shed some light ;-)
>

The links in /etc/rc*.d are still used to control services, and that's
not going to change soon. Upstart looks in /etc/event.d for startup
instructions, you can see for yourself just what it's doing in this
iteration of upstart.


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Old 02-13-2008, 11:43 PM
"Devon Harding"
 
Default Ubuntu Server & VMware

Review what is installed "dpkg --list" and
remove what you KNOW you don't need. Another place to start is /etc/init.d to
see directory what services are installed.
*
In practice I believe you will only gain
very minimal improvements by disabling services. I would do this only from a
security point of view or when the server is actually maximally loaded (when you
should rather consider upgrading).**
VMWare takes*quite a performance impact
from virtualizing hardware. So ensure you:


Use VMWare drivers, as they can 'avoid' using hardware emulation and
take a more efficient route.

Reduce requirements for hardware resources. Make sure you have
sufficient memory for caching.
Also monitor system load and performance. Ensure
you don't spends hours on winning virtually nothing.
*
If your virtualizing only Linux, you could
attempt the Xen route, which makes use of paravirtualizaiton, avoiding the
hardware emulation steps. In all cases, you will pay for virtualization. Only
the price varies.
*
- Joris


I ran 'dpkg --list' and it resulted in over 200 packages.* I wanted a general rule of thumb when building a VMware server.* Trying to get close to ESX as possible.

Also, I did virtualize one Windows 2003 box.* How can I update it with full vmware drivers?* Uninstall them from device manager and 'scan for new hardware'?


-Devon


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