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Old 01-11-2011, 07:47 PM
Bill Stanley
 
Default create a boot-able disk from an iso file

I don't understand why you would want to run a lobotomized version when
you have a legal license. I don't really want to know more details, but
if you change your mind, you can get the install disks here:

http://www.tipandtrick.net/2008/download-unmodified-original-windows-xp-
with-sp3-integrated-full-retail-and-vl-install-cd-iso-image-from-msdntec
hnet-plus-via-http-or-torrent/


By the way is that a single ULR? My email program (Thunderbird) made it
into several lines.



If you're your schizophrenic friend, that's fine; but if you're really
turning this loose on someone else, I hope they're a friend you plan to
visit often. You know they'll save the image when they shut it down.
Within fifteen minutes of connecting the VM to the network, the saved
image will include viruses. Then you'll have to provide a new, clean VM
(sans all their saved documents).

I would tell to save any important documents to a shared folder. (one
that is actually a Linux folder. Would a virus be able to do any harm
to documents stored there? As for me, I almost exclusively use Linux
for personal work. Unfortunately, I also have to work on a program and
compile it as a Windows program so I must be able to run Windows. The
compiler and IDE are the only thing I run on the VM. As such a OS that
doesn't have many features is acceptable.



Anyway, I really don't want to know, but if you only used the pirated
version because it's all you could find, you might change your mind and
have another go with these install images, and use the license number on
the sticker attached to the laptop. I'm pretty sure you can still
(legally) run this inside of a VM, but DRM will block many games because
they're running in a VM (even if it's legal).

(I've been running WinDirStat lately looking for my lost disk space, so
I know what you mean by bloat. The XP patches consume as much space as
the Original XP Pro SP3 install. It has doubled in size. This means, in
essence, that MS completely rewrote XP since it was released. Wow.)


Thanks for the tip about other places where I might get a legal version.
I would always prefer to use legal stuff. Of course, this is a
Windows issue and this is an Ubuntu Linux forum. But since it also a
VirtualBox matter running under Ubuntu I guess the subject is germaine.



Bill Stanley

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Old 01-11-2011, 08:33 PM
MR ZenWiz
 
Default create a boot-able disk from an iso file

On Tue, Jan 11, 2011 at 12:47 PM, Bill Stanley <bstanle@wowway.com> wrote:
>
> By the way is that a single ULR? *My email program (Thunderbird) made it
> into several lines.
>
Looks like one to me.

> I would tell to save any important documents to a shared folder. *(one that
> is actually a Linux folder. *Would a virus be able to do any harm to
> documents stored there?
If you're running Windows, then yes, of course. The virus doesn't
(necessarily) know or care what file system is underneath the files it
modifies. If you're running in Windows and a virus goes after a file,
it will be modified (as long as the permissions so allow). If it
happens to be a Linux executable, then chances are that the changes
will corrupt the file and it won't run (on Linux), but there are
UNIX/Linux viruses out there, too, They're just considerably rarer
than Win viruses (millions).

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Old 01-11-2011, 09:23 PM
"Joep L. Blom"
 
Default create a boot-able disk from an iso file

On 11/01/11 22:33, MR ZenWiz wrote:

On Tue, Jan 11, 2011 at 12:47 PM, Bill Stanley<bstanle@wowway.com> wrote:


By the way is that a single ULR? My email program (Thunderbird) made it
into several lines.


Looks like one to me.


I would tell to save any important documents to a shared folder. (one that
is actually a Linux folder. Would a virus be able to do any harm to
documents stored there?

If you're running Windows, then yes, of course. The virus doesn't
(necessarily) know or care what file system is underneath the files it
modifies. If you're running in Windows and a virus goes after a file,
it will be modified (as long as the permissions so allow). If it
happens to be a Linux executable, then chances are that the changes
will corrupt the file and it won't run (on Linux), but there are
UNIX/Linux viruses out there, too, They're just considerably rarer
than Win viruses (millions).


ZenWiz,
Please, show me one!
There are so many claims of viruses for Linux but I never saw one and
I'm working with Unix since 1978 and with Linux since 1992. Of course
there are methods to enter Unix/Linux systems but gain access to root -
which is a necessity for doing serious damage - is IMO only possible due
to neglect by the owner (e.g. using root as his main user).
Even planting malware like key-grabbers can only be achieved when Linux
users are careless or help from the inside is given. But correct me if
I'm wrong.

Joep

Joep


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Old 01-11-2011, 09:29 PM
MR ZenWiz
 
Default create a boot-able disk from an iso file

On Tue, Jan 11, 2011 at 2:23 PM, Joep L. Blom <jlblom@neuroweave.nl> wrote:
> On 11/01/11 22:33, MR ZenWiz wrote:
>>
>> If you're running Windows, then yes, of course. *The virus doesn't
>> (necessarily) know or care what file system is underneath the files it
>> modifies. *If you're running in Windows and a virus goes after a file,
>> it will be modified (as long as the permissions so allow). *If it
>> happens to be a Linux executable, then chances are that the changes
>> will corrupt the file and it won't run (on Linux), but there are
>> UNIX/Linux viruses out there, too, *They're just considerably rarer
>> than Win viruses (millions).
>>
> ZenWiz,
> Please, show me one!

I presume from your prior postings that you have heard of Google.
Last time I looked there were a whopping 42 viruses for UNIX/Linux
machines, but feel free to look and prove me wrong. :-)

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Old 01-11-2011, 09:42 PM
Nils Kassube
 
Default create a boot-able disk from an iso file

Joep L. Blom wrote:
> There are so many claims of viruses for Linux but I never saw one
> and I'm working with Unix since 1978 and with Linux since 1992. Of
> course there are methods to enter Unix/Linux systems but gain access
> to root - which is a necessity for doing serious damage - is IMO
> only possible due to neglect by the owner (e.g. using root as his
> main user).

I think root access isn't necessary at all for doing serious damage. For
a "normal user" like me, the most valuable data are stored in my home
directory and malware running with my privileges can delete all those
files. That would probably be the greatest damage that could be done to
my system. Furthermore, as a normal user the malware can start
applications e.g. to join a botnet and send spam mails. That would also
be a major damage, this time for the network, not for my machine. And
again root access isn't necessary.


Nils

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Old 01-11-2011, 09:45 PM
"Joep L. Blom"
 
Default create a boot-able disk from an iso file

On 11/01/11 23:29, MR ZenWiz wrote:

On Tue, Jan 11, 2011 at 2:23 PM, Joep L. Blom<jlblom@neuroweave.nl> wrote:

On 11/01/11 22:33, MR ZenWiz wrote:


If you're running Windows, then yes, of course. The virus doesn't
(necessarily) know or care what file system is underneath the files it
modifies. If you're running in Windows and a virus goes after a file,
it will be modified (as long as the permissions so allow). If it
happens to be a Linux executable, then chances are that the changes
will corrupt the file and it won't run (on Linux), but there are
UNIX/Linux viruses out there, too, They're just considerably rarer
than Win viruses (millions).


ZenWiz,
Please, show me one!


I presume from your prior postings that you have heard of Google.
Last time I looked there were a whopping 42 viruses for UNIX/Linux
machines, but feel free to look and prove me wrong. :-)


well, likewise.
Read this blog>
http://cristalinux.blogspot.com/2010/03/understanding-viruses-in-linux.html


Joep




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Old 01-11-2011, 10:11 PM
"Joep L. Blom"
 
Default create a boot-able disk from an iso file

On 11/01/11 23:42, Nils Kassube wrote:

Joep L. Blom wrote:

There are so many claims of viruses for Linux but I never saw one
and I'm working with Unix since 1978 and with Linux since 1992. Of
course there are methods to enter Unix/Linux systems but gain access
to root - which is a necessity for doing serious damage - is IMO
only possible due to neglect by the owner (e.g. using root as his
main user).


I think root access isn't necessary at all for doing serious damage. For
a "normal user" like me, the most valuable data are stored in my home
directory and malware running with my privileges can delete all those
files. That would probably be the greatest damage that could be done to
my system. Furthermore, as a normal user the malware can start
applications e.g. to join a botnet and send spam mails. That would also
be a major damage, this time for the network, not for my machine. And
again root access isn't necessary.


Nils


Nis,
I tend to disagree. Malware has to enter. This of course can occur via
port 80. However, to run a program an execute command must be given and
the executable bit must be set. You can install as many programs as you
want but a program that is not installed by you can not run as you and
therefore cannot damage your home directory. Of course as soon as you
grant somebody permission to enter your system (or your trusted program
provider is not as honest as you think) than you have a problem. For
that special case I have a special user with restricted permissions.
Another thing is to always have a firewall not so much for fending off
intruders (OK is handy) but to prevent unknown malware to contact the
outside world which means in practice that all outgoing ports are closed
except when specific programs (listed on the firewall) request access.
I agree that you must take some precautions even when using a Linux
system, but hey, you have also locks on your house and you don't give
away the key to everybody (which you do when you use windows, even
worse, your trusted (OS) builder has made several secret doors in your
house which you don't know but which aren't locked).

Joep


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Old 01-12-2011, 12:16 AM
MR ZenWiz
 
Default create a boot-able disk from an iso file

On Tue, Jan 11, 2011 at 2:45 PM, Joep L. Blom <jlblom@neuroweave.nl> wrote:
> well, likewise.
> Read this blog>
> http://cristalinux.blogspot.com/2010/03/understanding-viruses-in-linux.html
>
I stand corrected. Nice article.

I would note, however, that this article does not discuss worms, which
are yet a fourth kind of malware that have infected the UNIXverse
before - one rather infamous one in particular.

There are also other kinds of security exploits, for which we
frequently see updates.

But strictly speaking, Joep is quite right - there are no UNIX or
Linux viruses per se.

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Old 01-12-2011, 06:14 AM
"Joep L. Blom"
 
Default create a boot-able disk from an iso file

On 12/01/11 02:16, MR ZenWiz wrote:

On Tue, Jan 11, 2011 at 2:45 PM, Joep L. Blom<jlblom@neuroweave.nl> wrote:

well, likewise.
Read this blog>
http://cristalinux.blogspot.com/2010/03/understanding-viruses-in-linux.html


I stand corrected. Nice article.

I would note, however, that this article does not discuss worms, which
are yet a fourth kind of malware that have infected the UNIXverse
before - one rather infamous one in particular.

There are also other kinds of security exploits, for which we
frequently see updates.

But strictly speaking, Joep is quite right - there are no UNIX or
Linux viruses per se.


Thanks!
And of course I agree that with disregard of simple precautionary
measures any system is vulnerable, just as your house. Especially with
respect to worms this is true and don't forget > 70 % of all computer
fraud is internal, one of the most famous is the case of the programmer
of a banking program who transferred all figures < 0.00 to a secret
account when rounding off (that was in the eighties). Due to
carelessness he was caught not due to intelligent "sleuthing".

Joep



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Old 01-12-2011, 08:00 AM
Nils Kassube
 
Default create a boot-able disk from an iso file

Joep L. Blom wrote:
> On 11/01/11 23:42, Nils Kassube wrote:
> > I think root access isn't necessary at all for doing serious
> > damage. For a "normal user" like me, the most valuable data are
> > stored in my home directory and malware running with my privileges
> > can delete all those files. That would probably be the greatest
> > damage that could be done to my system. Furthermore, as a normal
> > user the malware can start applications e.g. to join a botnet and
> > send spam mails. That would also be a major damage, this time for
> > the network, not for my machine. And again root access isn't
> > necessary.
>
> I tend to disagree. Malware has to enter. This of course can occur
> via port 80. However, to run a program an execute command must be
> given and the executable bit must be set. You can install as many
> programs as you want but a program that is not installed by you can
> not run as you and therefore cannot damage your home directory.

I tend to disagree as well. How does malware get into a Windows system?
Usually there is a vulnerability of the browser or email client or
whatever. The same is possible with Linux / Unix programs. Granted,
clicking on an email attachment under Linux usually isn't as dangerous
as it is under Windows because it isn't automatically executable.

But we all know that programs like Adobe reader and flash player are a
major target of malware and the security holes found in those two alone
often are exploitable for Linux as well. If I stumble upon a malicious
website with a flash exploit targeted at Linux systems, the malicious
code runs with my privileges and I don't see why it can't install
something permanently which is executable and which is run at every
startup of my KDE or Gnome session. Something like "tar xfz malware.tgz"
inside the exploit code should suffice.

> Another thing is to always have a
> firewall not so much for fending off intruders (OK is handy) but to
> prevent unknown malware to contact the outside world which means in
> practice that all outgoing ports are closed except when specific
> programs (listed on the firewall) request access.

That's certainly good practice but unfortunately it is not the default
setup and as a "normal user" I wouldn't even think about the possibility
to lock down outgoing traffic.


Nils

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