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rikona 01-08-2011 10:51 PM

Odd chrs in filenames
 
I have hundreds of classical music files with what seems to be foreign
chrs in the file name. It is not possible to copy these to a backup -
it says 'file does not exist' but gives the name with some 'black
diamond' chrs in the name. I'm assuming these diamonds are the chrs it
does not know what to do with. I have to skip the file to continue.
There may be a thousand+ of these chrs - too many to do by hand. I
tried skipping manually, and it became clear this would take a VERY
long time, and I would still not get a copy.

Is there a way to semi-automatically change these chrs to their
'nearest good chr' so it would be approximately readable correctly in
English, AND the comp would like the name? :-)

Thanks,

rikona


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Basil Chupin 01-08-2011 11:24 PM

Odd chrs in filenames
 
On 09/01/2011 10:51, rikona wrote:

I have hundreds of classical music files with what seems to be foreign
chrs in the file name. It is not possible to copy these to a backup -
it says 'file does not exist' but gives the name with some 'black
diamond' chrs in the name. I'm assuming these diamonds are the chrs it
does not know what to do with. I have to skip the file to continue.
There may be a thousand+ of these chrs - too many to do by hand. I
tried skipping manually, and it became clear this would take a VERY
long time, and I would still not get a copy.

Is there a way to semi-automatically change these chrs to their
'nearest good chr' so it would be approximately readable correctly in
English, AND the comp would like the name? :-)

Thanks,

rikona



Has to do with the char set you are using on your computer. You are
probably using UTF-8 but the chars you see as "diamond" will be
displayed correctly if you switch over to Western (ISO 8859-1). (Or try
the reverse to what I just stated.)


BC

--
"Opinions are like assholes - everyone has one."
Inspector "Dirty Harry" Callahan


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Ric Moore 01-09-2011 05:24 AM

Odd chrs in filenames
 
On Sun, 2011-01-09 at 11:24 +1100, Basil Chupin wrote:
> On 09/01/2011 10:51, rikona wrote:
> > I have hundreds of classical music files with what seems to be foreign
> > chrs in the file name. It is not possible to copy these to a backup -
> > it says 'file does not exist' but gives the name with some 'black
> > diamond' chrs in the name. I'm assuming these diamonds are the chrs it
> > does not know what to do with. I have to skip the file to continue.
> > There may be a thousand+ of these chrs - too many to do by hand. I
> > tried skipping manually, and it became clear this would take a VERY
> > long time, and I would still not get a copy.
> >
> > Is there a way to semi-automatically change these chrs to their
> > 'nearest good chr' so it would be approximately readable correctly in
> > English, AND the comp would like the name? :-)
> >
> > Thanks,
> >
> > rikona
>
>
> Has to do with the char set you are using on your computer. You are
> probably using UTF-8 but the chars you see as "diamond" will be
> displayed correctly if you switch over to Western (ISO 8859-1). (Or try
> the reverse to what I just stated.)

If you can sorta figure out the filename and wish to copy/move it to
something more ascii, you could just use midnight commander (mc) for a
text file handler. When I run into Windows file names full of spaces and
prancing pink unicorns with spangles, I use mc to brute force them into
submission. It's a manly tool, for us manly Linux-OS men and for the
Linux Chics ladies, too! :) Ric

--
My father, Victor Moore (Vic) used to say:
"There are two Great Sins in the world...
..the Sin of Ignorance, and the Sin of Stupidity.
Only the former may be overcome." R.I.P. Dad.
Linux user# 44256


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Basil Chupin 01-09-2011 05:46 AM

Odd chrs in filenames
 
On 09/01/2011 17:24, Ric Moore wrote:

On Sun, 2011-01-09 at 11:24 +1100, Basil Chupin wrote:

On 09/01/2011 10:51, rikona wrote:

I have hundreds of classical music files with what seems to be foreign
chrs in the file name. It is not possible to copy these to a backup -
it says 'file does not exist' but gives the name with some 'black
diamond' chrs in the name. I'm assuming these diamonds are the chrs it
does not know what to do with. I have to skip the file to continue.
There may be a thousand+ of these chrs - too many to do by hand. I
tried skipping manually, and it became clear this would take a VERY
long time, and I would still not get a copy.

Is there a way to semi-automatically change these chrs to their
'nearest good chr' so it would be approximately readable correctly in
English, AND the comp would like the name? :-)

Thanks,

rikona


Has to do with the char set you are using on your computer. You are
probably using UTF-8 but the chars you see as "diamond" will be
displayed correctly if you switch over to Western (ISO 8859-1). (Or try
the reverse to what I just stated.)

If you can sorta figure out the filename and wish to copy/move it to
something more ascii, you could just use midnight commander (mc) for a
text file handler. When I run into Windows file names full of spaces and
prancing pink unicorns with spangles, I use mc to brute force them into
submission. It's a manly tool, for us manly Linux-OS men and for the
Linux Chics ladies, too! :) Ric


I prefer to use the compassionate, gentle persuasion, and a soft-voiced
approach to solving such a problem rather than the "brute force" (you
brute, you!) approach you are advocating O:-) .


Anyway, watcha doing still messing around with Windows garbage?! Shut
the damn Windows and stop the bugs from getting in! (Eh, I like what I
just wrote! I think I'll use it as a sig line - unless you want to use
of course.)


(Still having a hard time convincing people to switch from Windows, eh?
:-( Not to worry, Windows' time is nigh - 1111 hours on 12/12/2012 at
the latest.)


BC

--
"I would rather deal with a correct asshole than a polite dipshit ANY AND EVERYDAY"
Brian K. White


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Colin Law 01-09-2011 08:04 AM

Odd chrs in filenames
 
On 8 January 2011 23:51, rikona <rikona@sonic.net> wrote:
> I have hundreds of classical music files with what seems to be foreign
> chrs in the file name. It is not possible to copy these to a backup -
> it says 'file does not exist' but gives the name with some 'black
> diamond' chrs in the name. I'm assuming these diamonds are the chrs it
> does not know what to do with. I have to skip the file to continue.
> There may be a thousand+ of these chrs - too many to do by hand. I
> tried skipping manually, and it became clear this would take a VERY
> long time, and I would still not get a copy.

What format is the disk your are trying to backup to? Is FAT for
example able to store utf8 names?

A better solution may be to use tar and compress them into a single
backup file. You can do this very easily from the GUI by selecting
the files or folders, right click and select Compress. That will then
allow you to specify a filename and destination for the backup.
Alternatively it can be done from the command line.

Colin

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Hal Burgiss 01-09-2011 01:55 PM

Odd chrs in filenames
 
On Sat, Jan 8, 2011 at 7:24 PM, Basil Chupin <blchupin@iinet.net.au> wrote:



Has to do with the char set you are using on your computer. You are probably using UTF-8 but the chars you see as "diamond" will be displayed correctly if you switch over to Western (ISO 8859-1). (Or try the reverse to what I just stated.)




If they can off a Windows system, they are probably Windows-1252 character encoding (MS BS). There is a package called 'convmv', that should handle the conversion of filenames. iconv handles text conversion.
*--
Hal

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