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Old 12-01-2010, 05:00 PM
"Kevin O'Gorman"
 
Default How to change to 64-bit.

I seem to be running in 32-bit mode on my laptop, but it's actually 64-bit capable and dual-boots to Vista 64-bit.* It's
confirmed by /proc/cpuinfo with gives a virtual address space of*48 bits (physical 36).
*
I wonder what I have to do to switch.* I am unable to do simple things like compile with -m64 because gcc complains
about some stub library that I cannot find.
*
What am I missing?* A repository?* A package?* This is a first time for me, so I'm completely clueless, and the
only advice I can see is about installing fresh, which I'd really rather not do.
--
Kevin O'Gorman, PhD


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Old 12-01-2010, 05:05 PM
Scott Stevenson
 
Default How to change to 64-bit.

On Wed, Dec 01, 2010 at 10:00:58AM -0800, Kevin O'Gorman wrote:
[...]
> What am I missing? A repository? A package? This is a first time for me,
> so I'm completely clueless, and the
> only advice I can see is about installing fresh, which I'd really rather not
> do.

Kevin,

To move from 32- to 64-bit you'll need to do a fresh install using a
64-bit iso.

--
Scott Stevenson <scott@ecubyx.com>
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Old 12-01-2010, 05:16 PM
 
Default How to change to 64-bit.

>On Wed, Dec 01, 2010 at 10:00:58AM -0800, Kevin O'Gorman wrote:
>[...]
>> What am I missing? *A repository? *A package? *This is a first time for me,
>> so I'm completely clueless, and the
>> only advice I can see is about installing fresh, which I'd really rather not
>> do.
>
>Kevin,
>
>To move from 32- to 64-bit you'll need to do a fresh install using a
>64-bit iso.
>
>--
>Scott Stevenson <scott@ecubyx.com>

If you haven't already kept /home on a separate partition, you should in the future; it will make life easier.
In any case, back up /home and restore later, it will allow you to keep your config files.
You might also want to run*
$dpkg -l > ~/installed
to save the list of installed packages to a file called "installed" and then refer to that that as you install any non-default packages you may have installed on your 32-bit machine.
Good luck,Paul
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Old 12-01-2010, 07:36 PM
Colin Law
 
Default How to change to 64-bit.

On 1 December 2010 18:16, <pkaplan1@comcast.net> wrote:
>>On Wed, Dec 01, 2010 at 10:00:58AM -0800, Kevin O'Gorman wrote:
>>[...]
>>> What am I missing? *A repository? *A package? *This is a first time for
>>> me,
>>> so I'm completely clueless, and the
>>> only advice I can see is about installing fresh, which I'd really rather
>>> not
>>> do.
>>
>>Kevin,
>>
>>To move from 32- to 64-bit you'll need to do a fresh install using a
>>64-bit iso.
>>
>>--
>>Scott Stevenson <scott@ecubyx.com>
>
> If you haven't already kept /home on a separate partition, you should in the
> future; it will make life easier.
> In any case, back up /home and restore later, it will allow you to keep your
> config files.

As has been pointed out here a number of times it is possible to
install over an existing ubuntu without losing the home directory.
When installing, select Advanced option, select the existing ubuntu
partition as '/' but do _not_ select Format. This will then replace
all the system files leaving /home as is. It will still be necessary
to re-install any extra apps required, but the settings should be
retained in /home.

Colin

> You might also want to run
> $dpkg -l > ~/installed
> to save the list of installed packages to a file called "installed" and then
> refer to that that as you install any non-default packages you may have
> installed on your 32-bit machine.
> Good luck,
> Paul
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> https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
>
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>
>

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Old 12-02-2010, 06:04 PM
"Kevin O'Gorman"
 
Default How to change to 64-bit.

On Wed, Dec 1, 2010 at 12:36 PM, Colin Law <clanlaw@googlemail.com> wrote:


On 1 December 2010 18:16, *<pkaplan1@comcast.net> wrote:
>>On Wed, Dec 01, 2010 at 10:00:58AM -0800, Kevin O'Gorman wrote:
>>[...]

>>> What am I missing? *A repository? *A package? *This is a first time for
>>> me,
>>> so I'm completely clueless, and the
>>> only advice I can see is about installing fresh, which I'd really rather

>>> not
>>> do.
>>
>>Kevin,
>>
>>To move from 32- to 64-bit you'll need to do a fresh install using a
>>64-bit iso.
>>
>>--
>>Scott Stevenson <scott@ecubyx.com>

>
> If you haven't already kept /home on a separate partition, you should in the
> future; it will make life easier.
> In any case, back up /home and restore later, it will allow you to keep your

> config files.

As has been pointed out here a number of times it is possible to
install over an existing ubuntu without losing the home directory.
When installing, select Advanced option, select the existing ubuntu

partition as '/' but do _not_ select Format. *This will then replace
all the system files leaving /home as is. *It will still be necessary
to re-install any extra apps required, but the settings should be

retained in /home.

Colin


> You might also want to run
> $dpkg -l > ~/installed
> to save the list of installed packages to a file called "installed" and then
> refer to that that as you install any non-default packages you may have

> installed on your 32-bit machine.
> Good luck,
> Paul


Rats.* I'm not going to do any of the above, because it's clear that no one boot system can be both 32 and 64.* So I'll create a new partition and do a fresh 64-bit install.* This is really just a feasability study, so I'm not interested in making permanent changes to existing stuff (yet).* And I've got the space.

*
Thanks, all responders.* The info was at least indirectly helpful.
*
++ kevin
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