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Old 11-23-2010, 07:59 PM
Nathan Bahn
 
Default A Curious Problem (seemingly resolved, thankfully, but still.....)

Has anyone ever encountered an issue wherein all (and I do mean ALL) of the changes made within a partition disappeared -- or were reverted -- when the machine rebooted?

My machine is set up to dual-boot Ubuntu 10.10 and openSUSE 11.3 with a 3rd partition holding the files from another hard drive that was crapping out.* The 1st hint of a problem that arose after the rebooting was that the torrent files (not the actual files that were downloaded -- those I have stored in the 3rd partition) had disappeared from the Transmission program.* Then I noticed that the sound was gone! (And by the way, I wish to express my gratitude to Basil Chupin; I was able to remember just enough of his instructions to get ALSA working properly again -- exactly why PulseAudio interferes with ALSA is something I simply do NOT understand!) So now I'm slowly restoring the settings (Next job:* Restoring all of the fonts that were erased from OOo.) but would like to be able to avoid this problem from recurring; hence my question.

--N.B.
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Old 11-24-2010, 12:41 AM
ms
 
Default A Curious Problem (seemingly resolved, thankfully, but still.....)

On 23/11/10 20:59, Nathan Bahn wrote:
> Has anyone ever encountered an issue wherein all (and I do mean ALL) of the
> changes made within a partition disappeared -- or were reverted -- when the
> machine rebooted?
>
> My machine is set up to dual-boot Ubuntu 10.10 and openSUSE 11.3 with a 3rd
> partition holding the files from another hard drive that was crapping out.
> The 1st hint of a problem that arose after the rebooting was that the
> torrent files (not the actual files that were downloaded -- those I have
> stored in the 3rd partition) had disappeared from the Transmission program.
> Then I noticed that the sound was gone! (And by the way, I wish to express
> my gratitude to Basil Chupin; I was able to remember just enough of his
> instructions to get ALSA working properly again -- exactly why PulseAudio
> interferes with ALSA is something I simply do NOT understand!) So now I'm
> slowly restoring the settings (Next job: Restoring all of the fonts that
> were erased from OOo.) but would like to be able to avoid this problem from
> recurring; hence my question.

Was the partition mounted?
Sounds like you wrote etc. in the *mount point* directory without having
actually mounted the partition.

Try to unmount the partition and check if in the mount point there are
some unexpected files

--
Massimo Sandal, Ph.D.
http://devicerandom.org

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Old 11-24-2010, 01:33 AM
Nathan Bahn
 
Default A Curious Problem (seemingly resolved, thankfully, but still.....)

On Tue, Nov 23, 2010 at 8:41 PM, ms <devicerandom@gmail.com> wrote:

On 23/11/10 20:59, Nathan Bahn wrote:

> Has anyone ever encountered an issue wherein all (and I do mean ALL) of the

> changes made within a partition disappeared -- or were reverted -- when the

> machine rebooted?

>

> My machine is set up to dual-boot Ubuntu 10.10 and openSUSE 11.3 with a 3rd

> partition holding the files from another hard drive that was crapping out.

> The 1st hint of a problem that arose after the rebooting was that the

> torrent files (not the actual files that were downloaded -- those I have

> stored in the 3rd partition) had disappeared from the Transmission program.

> Then I noticed that the sound was gone! (And by the way, I wish to express

> my gratitude to Basil Chupin; I was able to remember just enough of his

> instructions to get ALSA working properly again -- exactly why PulseAudio

> interferes with ALSA is something I simply do NOT understand!) So now I'm

> slowly restoring the settings (Next job: *Restoring all of the fonts that

> were erased from OOo.) but would like to be able to avoid this problem from

> recurring; hence my question.



Was the partition mounted?

Sounds like you wrote etc. in the *mount point* directory without having

actually mounted the partition.



Try to unmount the partition and check if in the mount point there are

some unexpected files



--

Massimo Sandal, Ph.D.

http://devicerandom.org


M.S.--
I realize that this must be a silly question, but where is the mount point directory?

--N.B.
--
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See http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/no-word-attachments.html



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Old 11-24-2010, 02:05 AM
Mark
 
Default A Curious Problem (seemingly resolved, thankfully, but still.....)

On Tue, Nov 23, 2010 at 6:33 PM, Nathan Bahn <nathan.bahn@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> M.S.--
> I realize that this must be a silly question, but where is the mount point
> directory?
>
Well, yes, it is, but it's a subtle point that escapes people at times.

A mount point is just a directory. What M.S. was saying is that
perhaps you wrote to the (mount point) directory without mounting the
partition. In that case, the mount point will be treated as a normal
directory that can have files stored in it, like all directories can.

However, when you mount a device to a mount point (directory),
whatever was in that directory is hidden under whatever you mounted on
top of it.

E.g.:

~$ ls /boot
config-2.6.9-89.EL
config-2.6.9-89.ELlargesmp
grub/
initrd-2.6.9-89.EL.img
initrd-2.6.9-89.ELlargesmp.img
lost+found/
memtest86+-1.26
message
message.ja
symvers-2.6.9-89.EL.gz
symvers-2.6.9-89.ELlargesmp.gz
System.map-2.6.9-89.EL
System.map-2.6.9-89.ELlargesmp
vmlinuz-2.6.9-89.EL
vmlinuz-2.6.9-89.ELlargesmp
~$ mount /dev/sdb5 /boot
~$ ls /boot
anaconda-ks.cfg
AvamarClient-linux-rhel4-x86_64-5.0.100-409.rpm
commands_for_setup.txt
Desktop
install.log
install.log.syslog
ixgbe-2.0.75.7.tar.gz
ixgbe-2.0.84.9
ixgbe-2.0.84.9.tar.gz
ixgbevf-1.0.8
ixgbevf-1.0.8.tar.gz
om
OM_6.0.1_ManNode_A00.tar.gz
oracle
randsnapup
resync_with_dd
salil

See the difference?

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Old 11-24-2010, 09:10 AM
Nathan Bahn
 
Default A Curious Problem (seemingly resolved, thankfully, but still.....)

On Tue, Nov 23, 2010 at 10:05 PM, Mark <mhullrich@gmail.com> wrote:
[...]


A mount point is just a directory. *What M.S. was saying is that

perhaps you wrote to the (mount point) directory without mounting the

partition. *In that case, the mount point will be treated as a normal

directory that can have files stored in it, like all directories can.



However, when you mount a device to a mount point (directory),

whatever was in that directory is hidden under whatever you mounted on

top of it.



E.g.:



~$ ls /boot

config-2.6.9-89.EL

config-2.6.9-89.ELlargesmp

grub/

initrd-2.6.9-89.EL.img

initrd-2.6.9-89.ELlargesmp.img

lost+found/

memtest86+-1.26

message

message.ja

symvers-2.6.9-89.EL.gz

symvers-2.6.9-89.ELlargesmp.gz

System.map-2.6.9-89.EL

System.map-2.6.9-89.ELlargesmp

vmlinuz-2.6.9-89.EL

vmlinuz-2.6.9-89.ELlargesmp

~$ mount /dev/sdb5 /boot

~$ ls /boot

anaconda-ks.cfg

AvamarClient-linux-rhel4-x86_64-5.0.100-409.rpm

commands_for_setup.txt

Desktop

install.log

install.log.syslog

ixgbe-2.0.75.7.tar.gz

ixgbe-2.0.84.9

ixgbe-2.0.84.9.tar.gz

ixgbevf-1.0.8

ixgbevf-1.0.8.tar.gz

om

OM_6.0.1_ManNode_A00.tar.gz

oracle

randsnapup

resync_with_dd

salil



See the difference?


M.--

I THOUGHT I did, but the below indicates that I do not:
nat0@nat0-E-6100:~$ ls boot
ls: cannot access boot: No such file or directory

nat0@nat0-E-6100:~$ ls
Audiobooks* Documents* examples.desktop* Pictures*** Public*** ** Videos
Desktop*** ** Downloads** Music******************* Podcasts* Templates

--N.B.
--
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See http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/no-word-attachments.html


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Old 11-24-2010, 10:32 AM
Frans Ketelaars
 
Default A Curious Problem (seemingly resolved, thankfully, but still.....)

On Wed, 24 Nov 2010 05:10:06 -0500, Nathan Bahn wrote:

> On Tue, Nov 23, 2010 at 10:05 PM, Mark <mhullrich@gmail.com> wrote:
> [...]
>
>> A mount point is just a directory. What M.S. was saying is that
>> perhaps you wrote to the (mount point) directory without mounting the
>> partition. In that case, the mount point will be treated as a normal
>> directory that can have files stored in it, like all directories can.
>>
>> However, when you mount a device to a mount point (directory), whatever
>> was in that directory is hidden under whatever you mounted on top of
>> it.
>>
>> E.g.:
>>
>> ~$ ls /boot
>> config-2.6.9-89.EL
>> config-2.6.9-89.ELlargesmp
>> grub/
>> initrd-2.6.9-89.EL.img
>> initrd-2.6.9-89.ELlargesmp.img
>> lost+found/
>> memtest86+-1.26
>> message
>> message.ja
>> symvers-2.6.9-89.EL.gz
>> symvers-2.6.9-89.ELlargesmp.gz
>> System.map-2.6.9-89.EL
>> System.map-2.6.9-89.ELlargesmp
>> vmlinuz-2.6.9-89.EL
>> vmlinuz-2.6.9-89.ELlargesmp
>> ~$ mount /dev/sdb5 /boot
>> ~$ ls /boot
>> anaconda-ks.cfg
>> AvamarClient-linux-rhel4-x86_64-5.0.100-409.rpm commands_for_setup.txt
>> Desktop
>> install.log
>> install.log.syslog
>> ixgbe-2.0.75.7.tar.gz
>> ixgbe-2.0.84.9
>> ixgbe-2.0.84.9.tar.gz
>> ixgbevf-1.0.8
>> ixgbevf-1.0.8.tar.gz
>> om
>> OM_6.0.1_ManNode_A00.tar.gz
>> oracle
>> randsnapup
>> resync_with_dd
>> salil
>>
>> See the difference?
>>
>>
>
>
> M.--
>
> I THOUGHT I did, but the below indicates that I do not:
> nat0@nat0-E-6100:~$ ls boot
> ls: cannot access boot: No such file or directory nat0@nat0-E-6100:~$ ls
> Audiobooks Documents examples.desktop Pictures Public Videos
> Desktop Downloads Music Podcasts Templates

It should be '$ ls /boot' , not '$ ls boot'

-Frans


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Old 11-24-2010, 12:28 PM
Nathan Bahn
 
Default A Curious Problem (seemingly resolved, thankfully, but still.....)

On Wed, Nov 24, 2010 at 6:32 AM, Frans Ketelaars <ketelaars@wanadoo.nl> wrote:
[...]

It should be '$ ls /boot' , not '$ ls boot'
[...]


*
F.K.--
Thanks.
--N.B.
--
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See http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/no-word-attachments.html



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Old 11-24-2010, 12:46 PM
Nathan Bahn
 
Default A Curious Problem (seemingly resolved, thankfully, but still.....)

On Tue, Nov 23, 2010 at 10:05 PM, Mark <mhullrich@gmail.com> wrote:

On Tue, Nov 23, 2010 at 6:33 PM, Nathan Bahn <nathan.bahn@gmail.com> wrote:

>

> M.S.--

> I realize that this must be a silly question, but where is the mount point

> directory?

>

Well, yes, it is, but it's a subtle point that escapes people at times.



A mount point is just a directory. *What M.S. was saying is that

perhaps you wrote to the (mount point) directory without mounting the

partition. *In that case, the mount point will be treated as a normal

directory that can have files stored in it, like all directories can.



However, when you mount a device to a mount point (directory),

whatever was in that directory is hidden under whatever you mounted on

top of it.



E.g.:



~$ ls /boot

config-2.6.9-89.EL

config-2.6.9-89.ELlargesmp

grub/

initrd-2.6.9-89.EL.img

initrd-2.6.9-89.ELlargesmp.img

lost+found/

memtest86+-1.26

message

message.ja

symvers-2.6.9-89.EL.gz

symvers-2.6.9-89.ELlargesmp.gz

System.map-2.6.9-89.EL

System.map-2.6.9-89.ELlargesmp

vmlinuz-2.6.9-89.EL

vmlinuz-2.6.9-89.ELlargesmp

~$ mount /dev/sdb5 /boot

~$ ls /boot

anaconda-ks.cfg

AvamarClient-linux-rhel4-x86_64-5.0.100-409.rpm

commands_for_setup.txt

Desktop

install.log

install.log.syslog

ixgbe-2.0.75.7.tar.gz

ixgbe-2.0.84.9

ixgbe-2.0.84.9.tar.gz

ixgbevf-1.0.8

ixgbevf-1.0.8.tar.gz

om

OM_6.0.1_ManNode_A00.tar.gz

oracle

randsnapup

resync_with_dd

salil



See the difference?[...]*
This is what I have thus far:
nat0@nat0-E-6100:~$ ls /boot
abi-2.6.35-22-generic******** memtest86+_multiboot.bin
config-2.6.35-22-generic***** System.map-2.6.35-22-generic

grub************************* vmcoreinfo-2.6.35-22-generic
initrd.img-2.6.35-22-generic* vmlinuz-2.6.35-22-generic
memtest86+.bin
nat0@nat0-E-6100:~$ cd /dev
nat0@nat0-E-6100:/dev$ ls
agpgart********* loop5************** ram9******* sr1**** tty35* tty9

autofs********* * loop6************** random*** stderr* tty36* ttyS0
block********** * loop7************** rfkill******** stdin** tty37* ttyS1
bsg*************** lp0***************** root********* stdout* tty38* ttyS2

btrfs-control*** mapper************* rtc****** tty**** tty39* ttyS3
bus************* mcelog************* rtc0***** tty0*** tty4** uinput
cdrom*********** mem**************** scd0***** tty1*** tty40* urandom
cdrom1********** net**************** scd1***** tty10** tty41* usbmon0

cdrw1*********** network_latency**** sda****** tty11** tty42* usbmon1
char************ network_throughput* sda1***** tty12** tty43* usbmon2
console********* null*************** sda2***** tty13** tty44* usbmon3
core************ oldmem************* sda5***** tty14** tty45* usbmon4

cpu************* parport0*********** sda6***** tty15** tty46* usbmon5
cpu_dma_latency* pktcdvd************ sda7***** tty16** tty47* vcs
disk************ port*************** sda8***** tty17** tty48* vcs1
dri************* ppp**************** sda9***** tty18** tty49* vcs2

dvd1************ psaux************** sdb****** tty19** tty5** vcs3
dvdrw1********** ptmx*************** sdc****** tty2*** tty50* vcs4
ecryptfs******** pts**************** sdd****** tty20** tty51* vcs5
fb0************* ram0*************** sde****** tty21** tty52* vcs6

fd************** ram1*************** sdf****** tty22** tty53* vcs7
full************ ram10************** sdf1***** tty23** tty54* vcsa
fuse************ ram11************** sg0****** tty24** tty55* vcsa1
fw0************* ram12************** sg1****** tty25** tty56* vcsa2

hpet************ ram13************** sg2****** tty26** tty57* vcsa3
hwrng*********** ram14************** sg3****** tty27** tty58* vcsa4
input*********** ram15************** sg4****** tty28** tty59* vcsa5
kmsg************ ram2*************** sg5****** tty29** tty6** vcsa6

log************* ram3*************** sg6****** tty3*** tty60* vcsa7
loop0*********** ram4*************** sg7****** tty30** tty61* vga_arbiter
loop1*********** ram5*************** shm****** tty31** tty62* zero
loop2*********** ram6*************** snapshot* tty32** tty63

loop3*********** ram7*************** snd****** tty33** tty7
loop4*********** ram8*************** sr0****** tty34** tty8

What should I fill in the blank with?* "~$ mount /dev/____ /boot"

--N.B.

--
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See http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/no-word-attachments.html


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Old 11-24-2010, 05:27 PM
Mark
 
Default A Curious Problem (seemingly resolved, thankfully, but still.....)

On Wed, Nov 24, 2010 at 5:46 AM, Nathan Bahn <nathan.bahn@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> This is what I have thus far:
> nat0@nat0-E-6100:~$ ls /boot
> abi-2.6.35-22-generic******** memtest86+_multiboot.bin
> config-2.6.35-22-generic***** System.map-2.6.35-22-generic
> grub************************* vmcoreinfo-2.6.35-22-generic
> initrd.img-2.6.35-22-generic* vmlinuz-2.6.35-22-generic
> memtest86+.bin
> nat0@nat0-E-6100:~$ cd /dev
> nat0@nat0-E-6100:/dev$ ls
:
>
> What should I fill in the blank with?* "~$ mount /dev/____ /boot"
>

I wouldn't put anything in the blank. Run 'df' or 'mount' and post
the output if you still have questions. That will tell you what you
have mounted on /boot, if anything. If not, you just need to decide
which partition you want to mount on /boot and if it's okay with you
to hide all the files you show listed above as already there.

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