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Old 11-20-2010, 10:47 AM
Amichai Rotman
 
Default Asus EeePC 1005PG and Linux

Hey All,
I went to my mobile carrier customer service to get a mobile Internet plan for my line and got an Asus 1005PG (built in 3G GPRS modem) as a "gift" (included as part of the monthly payment).


I wasn't able to find any information regarding this model's compatibility with Linux (or Ubuntu, for that matter).
Any of of has experience with this specific model? With installing Ubuntu on it? More importantly - using the built in 3G modem?


My other question is in regard of the pre-installed Windows 7 (Starter Edition, I think) and the Linux based fast boot OS that comes with their latest models. I forget it's name:


Should I wipe out all the existing partitions and use the whole hard drive for Ubuntu 10.04 UNR? or
Should I dual boot with Windows 7 and leave the Recovery Mode partition untouched?


I*despise Microsoft prudocts and can't even stand the site of them (had bad experience (data loss) with them in the past and can't stand any of them since), but the only reasons I can think of for leaving the Windows on it is for compatibility check, and the obe thing I wasn't able to accomplish with Linux: upgrade my Nokia's firmware. Not even with VirtualBox - after my Nokia N97 boots while updating it looses connection with the VM and fails....


Thanks!*
--

.:================================================ ====:.

Amichai Rotman

Registered Linux User#: 201192 [http://counter.li.org/]


Registered Ubuntu User #12851 [http://ubuntucounter.geekosophical.net]

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


.:================================================ ====:.


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Old 11-20-2010, 01:42 PM
Bill Wright
 
Default Asus EeePC 1005PG and Linux

On 11/20/2010 06:47 AM, Amichai Rotman wrote:
> Hey All,
>
> I went to my mobile carrier customer service to get a mobile Internet
> plan for my line and got an Asus 1005PG (built in 3G GPRS modem) as a
> "gift" (included as part of the monthly payment).
>
> I wasn't able to find any information regarding this model's
> compatibility with Linux (or Ubuntu, for that matter).
>
> Any of of has experience with this specific model? With installing
> Ubuntu on it? More importantly - using the built in 3G modem?
>
> My other question is in regard of the pre-installed Windows 7 (Starter
> Edition, I think) and the Linux based fast boot OS that comes with
> their latest models. I forget it's name:
>
> Should I wipe out all the existing partitions and use the whole hard
> drive for Ubuntu 10.04 UNR? or
>
> Should I dual boot with Windows 7 and leave the Recovery Mode
> partition untouched?
>
> I despise Microsoft prudocts and can't even stand the site of them
> (had bad experience (data loss) with them in the past and can't stand
> any of them since), but the only reasons I can think of for leaving
> the Windows on it is for compatibility check, and the obe thing I
> wasn't able to accomplish with Linux: upgrade my Nokia's firmware. Not
> even with VirtualBox - after my Nokia N97 boots while updating it
> looses connection with the VM and fails....
>
> Thanks!
>
> --
>
> .:================================================ ====:.
>
> Amichai Rotman
>
> Registered Linux User#: 201192 [http://counter.li.org/]
> Registered Ubuntu User #12851 [http://ubuntucounter.geekosophical.net]
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> .:================================================ ====:.
What I did with my NETBOOK was buy another HD, "which are very
inexpensive" and do a clean install of Ubuntu on that drive. I feel as
you I want to get away from WIndows, I am not too hot on dual boot,
having the ability to go back to Windows is too tempting <grin>


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Old 11-20-2010, 10:37 PM
Thierry de Coulon
 
Default Asus EeePC 1005PG and Linux

On Sunday 21 November 2010 05:42:08 am Doug wrote:
> Three reasons to keep Windows:

Every one has his own reasons, but at least 1 and 3 don't seem very sound to
me:

> 1. There are still a few internet vendors whose order forms are not
> Linux-compatible.

Ignore them (if really, really you need to order from them Virtual Box will be
enough).

> 2. There are a few programs or services that only run on Windows. One
> I can think of:
> Crucial (memory) analysis program. I'm pretty sure I've run
> into others.

And you regularly have to check your memories? I don't think I ever did. But
depending on the utility, yes, maybe.

> 3. If you ever need to have someone work on the machine (God forbid!) he
> will not have a
> clue about Linux, and may very well make matters worse or break
> something.

This one seems really ridiculous to me. how is that person supposed to work on
Windows if no software is installed? You don't need "a clue about Linux" to
use the "start button", both Gnome's and KDE's are very similar to Windows',
and look for the program you need.

If you mean someone repairing the machine, they would be suposed to be
professionals, no? Otherwise this boils down to "allways pay a license to
Microsoft so that Microsoft certified It guys can repair your computer".

> --doug

Thierry



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Old 11-21-2010, 03:42 AM
Doug
 
Default Asus EeePC 1005PG and Linux

On 11/20/2010 05:47 AM, Amichai Rotman wrote:
> Hey All,
>
> I went to my mobile carrier customer service to get a mobile Internet
> plan for my line and got an Asus 1005PG (built in 3G GPRS modem) as a
> "gift" (included as part of the monthly payment).
>
> I wasn't able to find any information regarding this model's
> compatibility with Linux (or Ubuntu, for that matter).
>
> Any of of has experience with this specific model? With installing
> Ubuntu on it? More importantly - using the built in 3G modem?
>
> My other question is in regard of the pre-installed Windows 7 (Starter
> Edition, I think) and the Linux based fast boot OS that comes with
> their latest models. I forget it's name:
>
> Should I wipe out all the existing partitions and use the whole hard
> drive for Ubuntu 10.04 UNR? or
>
> Should I dual boot with Windows 7 and leave the Recovery Mode
> partition untouched?
>
> I despise Microsoft prudocts and can't even stand the site of them
> (had bad experience (data loss) with them in the past and can't stand
> any of them since), but the only reasons I can think of for leaving
> the Windows on it is for compatibility check, and the obe thing I
> wasn't able to accomplish with Linux: upgrade my Nokia's firmware. Not
> even with VirtualBox - after my Nokia N97 boots while updating it
> looses connection with the VM and fails....
>
> Thanks!
>
> --
>
> .:================================================ ====:.
>
> Amichai Rotman
Three reasons to keep Windows:

1. There are still a few internet vendors whose order forms are not
Linux-compatible.

2. There are a few programs or services that only run on Windows. One
I can think of:
Crucial (memory) analysis program. I'm pretty sure I've run
into others.

3. If you ever need to have someone work on the machine (God forbid!) he
will not have a
clue about Linux, and may very well make matters worse or break
something.

--doug

--
Blessed are the peacemakers...for they shall be shot at from both sides. --A. M. Greeley


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Old 11-21-2010, 05:09 AM
Doug
 
Default Asus EeePC 1005PG and Linux

On 11/20/2010 05:37 PM, Thierry de Coulon wrote:
> On Sunday 21 November 2010 05:42:08 am Doug wrote:
>> Three reasons to keep Windows:
> Every one has his own reasons, but at least 1 and 3 don't seem very sound to
> me:
>
>> 1. There are still a few internet vendors whose order forms are not
>> Linux-compatible.
> Ignore them (if really, really you need to order from them Virtual Box will be
> enough).
>
>> 2. There are a few programs or services that only run on Windows. One
>> I can think of:
>> Crucial (memory) analysis program. I'm pretty sure I've run
>> into others.
> And you regularly have to check your memories? I don't think I ever did. But
> depending on the utility, yes, maybe.
>
>> 3. If you ever need to have someone work on the machine (God forbid!) he
>> will not have a
>> clue about Linux, and may very well make matters worse or break
>> something.
> This one seems really ridiculous to me. how is that person supposed to work on
> Windows if no software is installed? You don't need "a clue about Linux" to
> use the "start button", both Gnome's and KDE's are very similar to Windows',
> and look for the program you need.
>
> If you mean someone repairing the machine, they would be suposed to be
> professionals, no? Otherwise this boils down to "allways pay a license to
> Microsoft so that Microsoft certified It guys can repair your computer".
>
>> --doug
> Thierry
Well, I'll agree that number 1 is something to avoid, if possible.
Number 2: The Crucial memory analyzer tells you what kind of memory
you can buy to upgrade your machine, in case you're not up on what's in it.
Number 3: Well, if Windows comes on the machine, there's really no
reason to dump it--you've paid for it already. Assume the repair guy has a
stack of CDs with diagnostics written for a Windows environment.

Anyway, I'm certainly not suggesting you buy Windows if you don't get it
already installed without an opportunity to refuse it and save the price.

Reason 4, of course, is that there are a few programs that are not Linux-
available. I'm thinking specifically of electronic design and analysis
software--there are probably others made for other engineering fields,
like for calculating strength of materials, etc. Most of these are high-
dollar items, and the cost of Windows is as nothing in comparison.
But probably most people don't need them.

--doug

--
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Old 11-22-2010, 09:54 AM
Chris G
 
Default Asus EeePC 1005PG and Linux

On Sun, Nov 21, 2010 at 12:09:45AM -0600, Doug wrote:
> On 11/20/2010 05:37 PM, Thierry de Coulon wrote:
> > On Sunday 21 November 2010 05:42:08 am Doug wrote:
> >> Three reasons to keep Windows:
> > Every one has his own reasons, but at least 1 and 3 don't seem very sound to
> > me:
> >
> >> 1. There are still a few internet vendors whose order forms are not
> >> Linux-compatible.
> > Ignore them (if really, really you need to order from them Virtual Box will be
> > enough).
> >
> >> 2. There are a few programs or services that only run on Windows. One
> >> I can think of:
> >> Crucial (memory) analysis program. I'm pretty sure I've run
> >> into others.
> > And you regularly have to check your memories? I don't think I ever did. But
> > depending on the utility, yes, maybe.
> >
> >> 3. If you ever need to have someone work on the machine (God forbid!) he
> >> will not have a
> >> clue about Linux, and may very well make matters worse or break
> >> something.
> > This one seems really ridiculous to me. how is that person supposed to work on
> > Windows if no software is installed? You don't need "a clue about Linux" to
> > use the "start button", both Gnome's and KDE's are very similar to Windows',
> > and look for the program you need.
> >
> > If you mean someone repairing the machine, they would be suposed to be
> > professionals, no? Otherwise this boils down to "allways pay a license to
> > Microsoft so that Microsoft certified It guys can repair your computer".
> >
> >> --doug
> > Thierry
> Well, I'll agree that number 1 is something to avoid, if possible.
> Number 2: The Crucial memory analyzer tells you what kind of memory
> you can buy to upgrade your machine, in case you're not up on what's in it.

It works perfectly well when run from the Crucial web site doesn't it,
it matters not at all what OS you're using.


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Old 11-22-2010, 12:51 PM
Bas Roufs
 
Default Asus EeePC 1005PG and Linux

Hello Amichai

>... *Asus 1005PG (built in 3G GPRS modem) (.... )Any of of has experience with this
> specific model? With installing Ubuntu on it? ... using the built in 3G modem?

In February 2010 I bought a similar netbook: Asus 1001 HA.

> My other question is in regard of the pre-installed Windows 7 (Starter Edition, I think) and
> the Linux based fast boot OS that comes with their latest models. I forget it's name:

The software configuration coming with my netbook was similar to yours
as it is now: Win7 Starter Edition pre-installed, a recovery partition
and also with traces of some Linux distro Asus has been using before
for this type of machine - I forgot it's name also. My netbook did not
come with a 3G modem, but the software configuration was the same or
similar. Moreover, I use now both inbuilt hardware for LAN and WLAN
and an external 3G modem for mobile internet. All this hardware works
now perfectly acceptably : with *Ubuntu 10.04 as well as with *Ubuntu
10.10.
>
> Should I wipe out all the existing partitions and use the whole hard drive for Ubuntu 10.04 UNR? or Should I dual boot with Windows 7 and leave the Recovery Mode partition untouched?
>
> I*despise Microsoft prudocts (....)

Perfectly well, I understand this feeling. But my practice experience
reveals that Windows is still necessary sometimes - in less than 1% of
all my working sessions, that OS is unavoidable. That's why I have
maintained now 23 GB as a Windows partition - which is less than 10 %
of the total 250 GB at the HD. But I have wiped away the remaining
recovery partition - if you would use that one, it would wipe away the
installed *buntu configuration and set the HD back to the original
state as it has been delivered.

What I have done is the following:

February/ March 2010
================
Inside Win7, I have removed/ uninstalled space consuming software for
which I use good Linux alternatives anyway - notably Adobe and and MS
Office.
Still inside Win7, I went to the configuration panel - there I managed
to shrink the space used by the Windows OS until about 15 GB out of
the total 250GB. At the Kubuntu users forum, someone with a similar
netbook with a similar software configuration- has urged me to do so -
otherwise it seems to be very difficult to minimise the Windows
partition.
I left the "recovery partition" as well as some other small, unclear
partition intact.
At the biggest of the remaining partitions, I installed Kubuntu 9.10.
First I experimented with an ISO file at a USB stick. But than I
bought a cheap, but perfectly well working external CD/DVD writer:
"LaCie". In that device, I put an ISO CD and started the installation
procedure - in the automated, "guided" way.
As a matter of result, the "bootloader" and a package like "GParted"
showed a very fragmented configuration at the hard disk: apart from
*buntu 9.10 and Win7, at least 2 other partitions showed up in the
list.

May 2010
========
After saving all the data files to an external HD, I did a fresh
"manual" install from a Kubuntu 10.04 LTS iso CD. I did maintain the
Windows configuration, but shrunk it a bit more in the beginning of
this installation procedure. In the same stage, I erased the recovery
partition and another unclear one. As a matter of result I got a much
more clear and practical configuration: SDA1 (23GB, NTFS/DOS/WIN7) and
SDA2 (209,6GB, extended). The remaining 17,11 GB apparently contains
some boot and firm software.
I have subdivided SDA2 in 3 partitions:
SDA5, with /, ext. 4, 93,13 GB, data partition;
SDA6, with ext. 4, /home, 93,13 GB, OS partition.

November 2010
===========
An upgrade to Kubuntu 10.10 was a good decision. Several packages
function considerably better now.
A still outstanding issue is the Windows partition: the Win 7CD that
came with this netbook, is not a "normal" installation CD, but
contains recovery software that would wipe away the whole *buntu
configuration. That's why I keep an open eye for some cheap
installation CD of some, whichever Windows distro that I can install
inside a virtual environment, so that I can wipe away the remaining
Windows partition.

Summary
=======
Shrink the Windows partition - first via Windows, than in an initial
stage of the manual install procedure.
Buy an external CD/DVD writing and reading device, like "LaCie";
Make an iso image CD of Ubuntu or Kubuntu 10.10 - the latest versions
of the *buntu distro's contain better software enabling you to work
with all present day kinds of 3G and other modems.
Wipe away the one or two other smaller partitions and merge them with
the 2 remaining partitions at SDA2: the data partition and the OS one.

Finally - take care of installing after the installation restricted
and "Medibuntu" multimedia software.

This is it for now. Respectfully yours,

Bas.

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