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Old 09-11-2010, 09:06 PM
Derek Maciel
 
Default Building new machine -- Ubuntu compatible?

The computer I'm using right now is NOT good for Ubuntu. I meet the
system requirements, sure, but after a random amount of minutes pass,
the entire screen freezes. I did some research on the problem and it
turns out that my integrated Intel graphics card is so old, that
Ubuntu no longer supports it. On older versions of Ubuntu, the
freezing is much less common, but 3D capability is null and even 2D
flash games or Youtube goes very slow.

So, I'm building a new computer (this will be my first computer built
and my first computer ever with a CPU better than a single-core P4),
and I'll post some of the components below, but I'm wondering if
anyone sees a problem on this? I won't be gaming or anything, but
finally seeing Desktop Effects on Ubuntu for myself or playing a
simple 3D game would be GREAT. =)

Thanks,
~Derek

CPU: Tri-Core AMD Athlon II x3 425 2.7GhZ
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819103726
Motherboard: GIGABYTE GA-MA78LM-S2H AMD
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128408
RAM: 2GB. Nothing special.
Video Card: Radeon HD 5550 1GB PCI Express 2.0 x16 (I won't actually
be buying this until a bit after the computer is built. I'll be using
the onboard video for a bit.)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102892

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Old 09-11-2010, 11:24 PM
Rashkae
 
Default Building new machine -- Ubuntu compatible?

Derek Maciel wrote:
> The computer I'm using right now is NOT good for Ubuntu. I meet the
> system requirements, sure, but after a random amount of minutes pass,
> the entire screen freezes. I did some research on the problem and it
> turns out that my integrated Intel graphics card is so old, that
> Ubuntu no longer supports it. On older versions of Ubuntu, the
> freezing is much less common, but 3D capability is null and even 2D
> flash games or Youtube goes very slow.
>
> So, I'm building a new computer (this will be my first computer built
> and my first computer ever with a CPU better than a single-core P4),
> and I'll post some of the components below, but I'm wondering if
> anyone sees a problem on this? I won't be gaming or anything, but
> finally seeing Desktop Effects on Ubuntu for myself or playing a
> simple 3D game would be GREAT. =)
>
> Thanks,
> ~Derek

If you plan on playing 3d games, then you'll probably want to install an
Nvidia card rather than that Radeon. OTOH, if you aren't really all
that interested in gaming, and would rather a fully open source system,
then forgo the video upgrade and stay with the on board Radeon 3000.
Should work fine for 3d desktop effects with open source drivers that
are available and in use today, rather than some year (or in the case of
AMD, decade, it seems) in the future. Unfortunately, as is the case
with most Mini-atx boards, you won't have any spare memory slots.... I
would consider getting 4GB of memory from the go, since any future
memory upgrades will mean tossing out your existing ram.



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Old 09-12-2010, 12:09 AM
Derek Maciel
 
Default Building new machine -- Ubuntu compatible?

Some nice points you bring up. A few things I'd like to add though:

I won't be doing any gaming on Ubuntu, but instead, dual booting
Windows 7 x64 (I don't have a licence key for Windows XP x64). When it
comes to gaming, many of the games I like to play are only available
to Windows, and my friend has recently purchased the Radeon, and I
really like it, which is why I'm going with it. However, if you feel
I'd get more performance on both Linux AND Windows for about the same
price or maybe a bit more, than of course I'll go with the nVidia.

The maximum power I'd probably need for the video card is to be able
to play Portal 2 when it comes out, and maybe Starcraft 2. Therefore,
the card I've chosen works fine for that description. However, like I
mentioned before, this is a long-term build since I'm saving up money
and buying individual parts as I have the money for them. That is why
I'll be buying the video card LAST, as the motherboard has internal
graphics.

About the RAM: I've never had a computer with more than 512MB of RAM,
and even the computer I'm using right now is 512MB. With that aside,
I'm planning on buying a single 2GB stick of RAM just to get it built
and to save up money for the graphics card, and then maybe later I'll
buy an additional 4GB stick.

Thanks,
~Derek

On 11 September 2010 19:24, Rashkae <ubuntu@tigershaunt.com> wrote:
> Derek Maciel wrote:
>> The computer I'm using right now is NOT good for Ubuntu. I meet the
>> system requirements, sure, but after a random amount of minutes pass,
>> the entire screen freezes. I did some research on the problem and it
>> turns out that my integrated Intel graphics card is so old, that
>> Ubuntu no longer supports it. On older versions of Ubuntu, the
>> freezing is much less common, but 3D capability is null and even 2D
>> flash games or Youtube goes very slow.
>>
>> So, I'm building a new computer (this will be my first computer built
>> and my first computer ever with a CPU better than a single-core P4),
>> and I'll post some of the components below, but I'm wondering if
>> anyone sees a problem on this? I won't be gaming or anything, but
>> finally seeing Desktop Effects on Ubuntu for myself or playing a
>> simple 3D game would be GREAT. =)
>>
>> Thanks,
>> ~Derek
>
> If you plan on playing 3d games, then you'll probably want to install an
> Nvidia card rather than that Radeon. *OTOH, if you aren't really all
> that interested in gaming, and would rather a fully open source system,
> then forgo the video upgrade and stay with the on board Radeon 3000.
> Should work fine for 3d desktop effects with open source drivers that
> are available and in use today, rather than some year (or in the case of
> AMD, decade, it seems) in the future. *Unfortunately, as is the case
> with most Mini-atx boards, you won't have any spare memory slots.... I
> would consider getting 4GB of memory from the go, since any future
> memory upgrades will mean tossing out your existing ram.
>
>
>
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> Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
>

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Old 09-12-2010, 12:59 AM
Rashkae
 
Default Building new machine -- Ubuntu compatible?

Derek Maciel wrote:
> Some nice points you bring up. A few things I'd like to add though:
>
> I won't be doing any gaming on Ubuntu, but instead, dual booting
> Windows 7 x64 (I don't have a licence key for Windows XP x64). When it
> comes to gaming, many of the games I like to play are only available
> to Windows, and my friend has recently purchased the Radeon, and I
> really like it, which is why I'm going with it. However, if you feel
> I'd get more performance on both Linux AND Windows for about the same
> price or maybe a bit more, than of course I'll go with the nVidia.
>

Now that's a tricky question... I don't really follow much in the gaming
news, so I can't tell you which will be better for your purpose..
However, Nvidia, while still releasing Linux drivers, has all but
abandoned Open Source developers, whereas AMD has been progressively
releasing more and more of their drivers in working Open source
editions, so not only will that Radeon 5000 work with AMD's binary
driver, in the future, you won't need binary driver. This is a really
good thing, (mostly because ATI binary drivers are horrendously bad)

>
> About the RAM: I've never had a computer with more than 512MB of RAM,
> and even the computer I'm using right now is 512MB. With that aside,
> I'm planning on buying a single 2GB stick of RAM just to get it built
> and to save up money for the graphics card, and then maybe later I'll
> buy an additional 4GB stick.
>

Personally, I would never even consider buying a mini board. With all
the work I do refurbishing and updating older computers, the limitations
of fewer slots always becomes a problem down the road. For Long term
system, spending the extra $40 - $50 now for a full ATX board is,
IMNSHO, the way to go.

Modern systems get better performance with Dual Channel Memory
configuration. That requires that your memory DIMMS be installed in
matched pairs. IE, if you want 2GB ram, you would need two identical
1GB DIMMS to get Dual Channel configuration.




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Old 09-12-2010, 01:50 AM
Leonardo Augusto
 
Default Building new machine -- Ubuntu compatible?

Almost every (even really old school computers - pentium 133 like) computer can run xubuntu...
It's pretty fast, with average eyecandy, with all the ubuntu support (from both canonical and the community)


On 11 September 2010 21:59, Rashkae <ubuntu@tigershaunt.com> wrote:

Derek Maciel wrote:

> Some nice points you bring up. A few things I'd like to add though:

>

> I won't be doing any gaming on Ubuntu, but instead, dual booting

> Windows 7 x64 (I don't have a licence key for Windows XP x64). When it

> comes to gaming, many of the games I like to play are only available

> to Windows, and my friend has recently purchased the Radeon, and I

> really like it, which is why I'm going with it. However, if you feel

> I'd get more performance on both Linux AND Windows for about the same

> price or maybe a bit more, than of course I'll go with the nVidia.

>



Now that's a tricky question... I don't really follow much in the gaming

news, so I can't tell you which will be better for your purpose..

However, Nvidia, while still releasing Linux drivers, has all but

abandoned Open Source developers, whereas AMD has been progressively

releasing more and more of their drivers in working Open source

editions, so not only will that Radeon 5000 work with AMD's binary

driver, in the future, you won't need binary driver. *This is a really

good thing, (mostly because ATI binary drivers are horrendously bad)



>

> About the RAM: I've never had a computer with more than 512MB of RAM,

> and even the computer I'm using right now is 512MB. With that aside,

> I'm planning on buying a single 2GB stick of RAM just to get it built

> and to save up money for the graphics card, and then maybe later I'll

> buy an additional 4GB stick.

>



Personally, I would never even consider buying a mini board. *With all

the work I do refurbishing and updating older computers, the limitations

of fewer slots always becomes a problem down the road. *For Long term

system, spending the extra $40 - $50 now for a full ATX board is,

IMNSHO, the way to go.



Modern systems get better performance with Dual Channel Memory

configuration. *That requires that your memory DIMMS be installed in

matched pairs. *IE, if you want 2GB ram, you would need two identical

1GB DIMMS to get Dual Channel configuration.









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Old 09-12-2010, 02:04 AM
Derek Maciel
 
Default Building new machine -- Ubuntu compatible?

Yeah, that's mostly why I wasn't too worried about my processor, I was
more worried about the video card, as it's the reason why I can't run
Ubuntu right now.

P.S. Xubuntu uses more RAM than Ubuntu/Kubuntu/Edubuntu.

On 11 September 2010 21:50, Leonardo Augusto
<leonardodearaujoaugusto@gmail.com> wrote:
> Almost every (even really old school computers - pentium 133 like) computer
> can run xubuntu...
> It's pretty fast, with average eyecandy, with all the ubuntu support (from
> both canonical and the community)
>
> On 11 September 2010 21:59, Rashkae <ubuntu@tigershaunt.com> wrote:
>>
>> Derek Maciel wrote:
>> > Some nice points you bring up. A few things I'd like to add though:
>> >
>> > I won't be doing any gaming on Ubuntu, but instead, dual booting
>> > Windows 7 x64 (I don't have a licence key for Windows XP x64). When it
>> > comes to gaming, many of the games I like to play are only available
>> > to Windows, and my friend has recently purchased the Radeon, and I
>> > really like it, which is why I'm going with it. However, if you feel
>> > I'd get more performance on both Linux AND Windows for about the same
>> > price or maybe a bit more, than of course I'll go with the nVidia.
>> >
>>
>> Now that's a tricky question... I don't really follow much in the gaming
>> news, so I can't tell you which will be better for your purpose..
>> However, Nvidia, while still releasing Linux drivers, has all but
>> abandoned Open Source developers, whereas AMD has been progressively
>> releasing more and more of their drivers in working Open source
>> editions, so not only will that Radeon 5000 work with AMD's binary
>> driver, in the future, you won't need binary driver. *This is a really
>> good thing, (mostly because ATI binary drivers are horrendously bad)
>>
>> >
>> > About the RAM: I've never had a computer with more than 512MB of RAM,
>> > and even the computer I'm using right now is 512MB. With that aside,
>> > I'm planning on buying a single 2GB stick of RAM just to get it built
>> > and to save up money for the graphics card, and then maybe later I'll
>> > buy an additional 4GB stick.
>> >
>>
>> Personally, I would never even consider buying a mini board. *With all
>> the work I do refurbishing and updating older computers, the limitations
>> of fewer slots always becomes a problem down the road. *For Long term
>> system, spending the extra $40 - $50 now for a full ATX board is,
>> IMNSHO, the way to go.
>>
>> Modern systems get better performance with Dual Channel Memory
>> configuration. *That requires that your memory DIMMS be installed in
>> matched pairs. *IE, if you want 2GB ram, you would need two identical
>> 1GB DIMMS to get Dual Channel configuration.
>>
>>
>>
>>
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>> ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
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>> https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
>
>
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Old 09-12-2010, 09:50 AM
David Fletcher
 
Default Building new machine -- Ubuntu compatible?

On Sunday 12 September 2010 02:50:53 Leonardo Augusto wrote:
> Almost every (even really old school computers - pentium 133 like) computer
> can run xubuntu...
> It's pretty fast, with average eyecandy, with all the ubuntu support (from
> both canonical and the community)
>

I just lent to a friend with a dead laptop, the only spare working PC I have,
which is a Celeron 600 with 3x128MB RAM. It's running Lucid Xubuntu. It was
working OK with my WiFi but not in her flat for some reason, but I was able
to move the ADSL router to a phone socket in the same room and connect the PC
through the Ethernet. It's usable for her for a couple of months.

She doesn't need power or portability so I'm recommending she gets one of the
Atom motherboards I used in the low power server. It takes up to 2GB memory
and has a DVI socket so it should make a nice little mini system for her
methinks. I'm wondering whether or not to get another one for myself to play
around with.

Dave

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Old 09-12-2010, 03:39 PM
Derek Maciel
 
Default Building new machine -- Ubuntu compatible?

Well, really you should only build a miniITX system if you
specifically /need/ a minisystem. Like, if you need a smallish build,
a microATX motherboard would be bigger than a miniITX but it has more
PCI slots, etc. A microATX motherboard is still pretty small, and I've
seen cases for that form factor on Newegg that look like a DVD player,
so they're obviously a lot smaller than a normal ATX-form-factor
build.

If you're planning on building a mini system, and you'd like to hang
it behind your LCD monitor, or in your Entertainment System and use it
as a DVR/home server, then you should go with a miniITX.

On 12 September 2010 05:50, David Fletcher <dave@thefletchers.net> wrote:
> On Sunday 12 September 2010 02:50:53 Leonardo Augusto wrote:
>> Almost every (even really old school computers - pentium 133 like) computer
>> can run xubuntu...
>> It's pretty fast, with average eyecandy, with all the ubuntu support (from
>> both canonical and the community)
>>
>
> I just lent to a friend with a dead laptop, the only spare working PC I have,
> which is a Celeron 600 with 3x128MB RAM. It's running Lucid Xubuntu. It was
> working OK with my WiFi but not in her flat for some reason, but I was able
> to move the ADSL router to a phone socket in the same room and connect the PC
> through the Ethernet. It's usable for her for a couple of months.
>
> She doesn't need power or portability so I'm recommending she gets one of the
> Atom motherboards I used in the low power server. It takes up to 2GB memory
> and has a DVI socket so it should make a nice little mini system for her
> methinks. I'm wondering whether or not to get another one for myself to play
> around with.
>
> Dave
>
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