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Old 09-11-2010, 12:38 PM
Amichai Rotman
 
Default Backing up CD / DVD Media

Hi All,
I have a bunch of DVDs and CDs I'd like to back up in case the media is damaged (scratches and such).
I was thinking of using the dd command to create ISO images and keep those ISOs on an external HD I can tuck away someplace safe.


So, I'd pop the disc in the drive and after it mounts I go to the terminal and enter something like:
dd if=/dev/sr0 of=/whatever.iso
I wanted to make sure I am on the right path and maybe there is a better way to do this. I's love your input on this.


The idea is to have the ISO somewhere safe, in case the CD / DVD becomes unusable, I just pop a blank media to the writer and burn the ISO to it...
Thanks!
.:================================================ ====:.



Amichai Rotman

Registered Linux User#: 201192 [http://counter.li.org/]
Registered Ubuntu User #12851 [http://ubuntucounter.geekosophical.net]



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
.:================================================ ====:.



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Old 09-11-2010, 12:48 PM
Karl Auer
 
Default Backing up CD / DVD Media

On Sat, 2010-09-11 at 15:38 +0300, Amichai Rotman wrote:
> The idea is to have the ISO somewhere safe, in case the CD / DVD
> becomes unusable, I just pop a blank media to the writer and burn
> the ISO to it...

Put the ISO on a memory stick or SD card. They cost very little, but for
the price of a HDD you could get quite a few of them. They are immune to
shock, magnetic interference and so on, so probably a more reliable form
of mid-term storage than a HDD. Get SD cards with a write-protect tab
for added security....

Regards, K.
>
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Old 09-11-2010, 02:46 PM
Basil Chupin
 
Default Backing up CD / DVD Media

On 11/09/2010 22:38, Amichai Rotman wrote:
> Hi All,
>
> I have a bunch of DVDs and CDs I'd like to back up in case the media
> is damaged (scratches and such).

First question: are these originals or already copied, burnt, copies
onto CDs/DVDs?

Original CDs/DVDs are pressed onto the medium and not burnt to a
chemical layer(s).

If they are originals then unless you go scratching them and otherwise
abusing them then they should be OK for quite some years.

On the other hand if they are already copied/burnt onto CDs/DVDs then
why not simply copy them again (using K3 for example) to other, good
quality, CDs/DVDs?

Simply copy them without any ISO-ing stuff involved: KD3 - Copy Medium.

On the other hand, if you are working with DVDs then using K9Copy would
be the way to go. More on this if you want more info....

The cost of CDs is now next to nothing for each disc. DVDs almost the
same but it depends on whether you are using DVD5 or DVD9 (dual layer).

For CDs, TDK are very good. For DVDs, Verbatim (they are one of the two
manufacturers who have developed a special process for their DVDs - see
info in DVD related URLs).

While these manufacturers claim that their discs will last something
like 75 years as a minimum, I would re-copy the discs in about 5 years.
And by which time the technology would have changed so that you will
need to do this anyway because the CD/DVD player would be a dinosaur and
the copies would have to be made onto some other, probably some
biological, medium.

Already now you have the memristor in the works which is due to be
around 2013 - http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-11165087.

RE using an HD, the way that they are now constructed with massive
compression of data into an ever decreasing platter space for what
'they' are trying to cram into that space, even with using vertical
writes instead of the "old" horizontal writes, as a long term storage
medium I am not sure that an HD is the way to go. For example, I bought
2 HDs at the end of last September. One of them simply stopped working
without any indication of any problems - S.M.A.R.T and all! - a couple
of weeks ago and I cannot have it replaced under the 3-year warranty
because it contains sensitive information.

You could use USB flash discs but you would need to look VERY carefully
at them to choose a brand which is not only fast on both read/write but
MAINLY on how long they are warranted for. Something like a Corsair is
warranted for 10 years but something like a Kingston is for only 3 years
(and it is slow); other brands are not only slower but also are
warranted for 2 years. And if you want something like a Corsair, they
are not cheap - keeping in mind that we once had the USB v2.0 protocol
but now are starting to have the v3.0 which, as usual, increases the
cost of v3.0 flash discs while the manufacturers recoup their
manufacturing setup costs....

Of course, there is also the tape backup option.

The bottom line is: consider how important your CDs/DVDs are, how much
do you want to spend in preserving the info over the years, and how much
time you are prepared to do all this.

Just as an example, in support of my argument to use CDs/DVDs, I
recorded my 1970's vinyls (Herbie Mann, War, Billie Swan, Pink Floyd,
etc :-) ) to CDs many years ago. They play without a glitch even though
they have been burnt onto a chemical based CD.

Oh, one other comment: do you want to compress your CDs into, say, mp3
format or keep them at their original sound quality? This will influence
on what you would use to store your precious CDs (DVDs - well, you
wouldn't want to chop them down from the original quality, would you?)

BC


>
> I was thinking of using the dd command to create ISO images and keep
> those ISOs on an external HD I can tuck away someplace safe.
>
> So, I'd pop the disc in the drive and after it mounts I go to the
> terminal and enter something like:
>
> dd if=/dev/sr0 of=/whatever.iso
>
> I wanted to make sure I am on the right path and maybe there is a
> better way to do this. I's love your input on this.
>
> The idea is to have the ISO somewhere safe, in case the CD / DVD
> becomes unusable, I just pop a blank media to the writer and burn the
> ISO to it...
>
> Thanks!
>
> .:================================================ ====:.
>
> Amichai Rotman
>
> Registered Linux User#: 201192 [http://counter.li.org/]
> Registered Ubuntu User #12851 [http://ubuntucounter.geekosophical.net]
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> .:================================================ ====:.
>


--
Fact is that which enough people believe. Truth is determined by how fervently they believe it.


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Old 09-11-2010, 03:35 PM
Amichai Rotman
 
Default Backing up CD / DVD Media

The whole issue came to me when my 4 years old son broke one of his favorite DVDs to*pieces...
I was lucky to think ahead and I actually made an ISO copy of it before I put it in the DVD Player for the first time - so I was able to burn a copy and use it. Hence the scenario I have described.


I was only wondering if I was using the right tool (dd) or is there a better app (GUI,*maybe)?
Ironically, 2GB *and 4GB SD cards are more*expensive than 8GB or 16 GB.


Long term reliability is crucial - that's the whole point. Any of you could recommend a brand or even a specific model that might be suitable for the job?
Thanks again!*


.:================================================ ====:.

Amichai Rotman

Registered Linux User#: 201192 [http://counter.li.org/]
Registered Ubuntu User #12851 [http://ubuntucounter.geekosophical.net]



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
.:================================================ ====:.





On Sat, Sep 11, 2010 at 17:46, Basil Chupin <blchupin@iinet.net.au> wrote:


On 11/09/2010 22:38, Amichai Rotman wrote:

> Hi All,

>

> I have a bunch of DVDs and CDs I'd like to back up in case the media

> is damaged (scratches and such).



First question: are these originals or already copied, burnt, copies

onto CDs/DVDs?



Original CDs/DVDs are pressed onto the medium and not burnt to a

chemical layer(s).



If they are originals then unless you go scratching them and otherwise

abusing them then they should be OK for quite some years.



On the other hand if they are already copied/burnt onto CDs/DVDs then

why not simply copy them again (using K3 for example) to other, good

quality, CDs/DVDs?



Simply copy them without any ISO-ing stuff involved: KD3 - Copy Medium.



On the other hand, if you are working with DVDs then using K9Copy would

be the way to go. More on this if you want more info....



The cost of CDs is now next to nothing for each disc. DVDs almost the

same but it depends on whether you are using DVD5 or DVD9 (dual layer).



For CDs, TDK are very good. For DVDs, Verbatim (they are one of the two

manufacturers who have developed a special process for their DVDs - see

info in DVD related URLs).



While these manufacturers claim that their discs will last something

like 75 years as a minimum, I would re-copy the discs in about 5 years.

And by which time the technology would have changed so that you will

need to do this anyway because the CD/DVD player would be a dinosaur and

the copies would have to be made onto some other, probably some

biological, medium.



Already now you have the memristor in the works which is due to be

around 2013 - http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-11165087.



RE using an HD, the way that they are now constructed with massive

compression of data into an ever decreasing platter space for what

'they' are trying to cram into that space, even with using vertical

writes instead of the "old" horizontal writes, as a long term storage

medium I am not sure that an HD is the way to go. For example, I bought

2 HDs at the end of last September. One of them simply stopped working

without any indication of any problems - S.M.A.R.T and all! - a couple

of weeks ago and I cannot have it replaced under the 3-year warranty

because it contains sensitive information.



You could use USB flash discs but you would need to look VERY carefully

at them to choose a brand which is not only fast on both read/write but

MAINLY on how long they are warranted for. Something like a Corsair is

warranted for 10 years but something like a Kingston is for only 3 years

(and it is slow); other brands are not only slower but also are

warranted for 2 years. And if you want something like a Corsair, they

are not cheap - keeping in mind that we once had the USB v2.0 protocol

but now are starting to have the v3.0 which, as usual, increases the

cost of v3.0 flash discs while the manufacturers recoup their

manufacturing setup costs....



Of course, there is also the tape backup option.



The bottom line is: consider how important your CDs/DVDs are, how much

do you want to spend in preserving the info over the years, and how much

time you are prepared to do all this.



Just as an example, in support of my argument to use CDs/DVDs, I

recorded my 1970's vinyls (Herbie Mann, War, Billie Swan, Pink Floyd,

etc :-) ) to CDs many years ago. They play without a glitch even though

they have been burnt onto a chemical based CD.



Oh, one other comment: do you want to compress your CDs into, say, mp3

format or keep them at their original sound quality? This will influence

on what you would use to store your precious CDs (DVDs - well, you

wouldn't want to chop them down from the original quality, would you?)



BC





>

> I was thinking of using the dd command to create ISO images and keep

> those ISOs on an external HD I can tuck away someplace safe.

>

> So, I'd pop the disc in the drive and after it mounts I go to the

> terminal and enter something like:

>

> dd if=/dev/sr0 of=/whatever.iso

>

> I wanted to make sure I am on the right path and maybe there is a

> better way to do this. I's love your input on this.

>

> The idea is to have the ISO somewhere safe, in case the CD / DVD

> becomes unusable, I just pop a blank media to the writer and burn the

> ISO to it...

>

> Thanks!

>

> .:================================================ ====:.

>

> Amichai Rotman

>

> Registered Linux User#: 201192 [http://counter.li.org/]

> Registered Ubuntu User #12851 [http://ubuntucounter.geekosophical.net]

>

> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

> .:================================================ ====:.

>





--

Fact is that which enough people believe. Truth is determined by how fervently they believe it.





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Old 09-11-2010, 03:38 PM
NoOp
 
Default Backing up CD / DVD Media

On 09/11/2010 05:38 AM, Amichai Rotman wrote:
> Hi All,
>
> I have a bunch of DVDs and CDs I'd like to back up in case the media is
> damaged (scratches and such).
>
> I was thinking of using the dd command to create ISO images and keep those
> ISOs on an external HD I can tuck away someplace safe.
>
> So, I'd pop the disc in the drive and after it mounts I go to the terminal
> and enter something like:
>
> dd if=/dev/sr0 of=/whatever.iso
>
> I wanted to make sure I am on the right path and maybe there is a better way
> to do this. I's love your input on this.
>
> The idea is to have the ISO somewhere safe, in case the CD / DVD becomes
> unusable, I just pop a blank media to the writer and burn the ISO to it...

These might be of help:
http://ubuntuforums.org/archive/index.php/t-6509.html
[How to create ISO images from your HD CD DVD]
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RestrictedFormats/RippingDVDs
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/BackupDVD
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/K9Copy
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/K3b
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/CDRipping


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Old 09-12-2010, 02:17 AM
Basil Chupin
 
Default Backing up CD / DVD Media

On 12/09/2010 01:35, Amichai Rotman wrote:
> The whole issue came to me when my 4 years old son broke one of his
> favorite DVDs to¬ pieces...
>
> I was lucky to think ahead and I actually made an ISO copy of it
> before I put it in the DVD Player for the first time - so I was able
> to burn a copy and use it. Hence the scenario I have described.
>
> I was only wondering if I was using the right tool (dd) or is there a
> better app (GUI,¬ maybe)?
>
> Ironically, 2GB ¬ and 4GB SD cards are more¬ expensive than 8GB or 16 GB.
>
> Long term reliability is crucial - that's the whole point. Any of you
> could recommend a brand or even a specific model that might be
> suitable for the job?
>
> Thanks again!¬

Are you talking here about SD cards or about USB flash discs?

Re brands, I already gave you one such brand: Corsair, but there is
another one - do a search on reviews of flash discs/memory sticks.

This of course applies here in Australia and where you are it will be
different but you will get the general picture about the prices of
things. This is from the shop I normally do my buying so have a look
around re SD cards, USB flash discs and whatever:

http://www.computeronline.com.au/products.php?C_ID=2&S_ID=337

Now, I think that you ought to break up your needs into the 2
categories: CDs with music on them and then the DVDs with movies on
them. Reason: how many DVDs do you think you can get onto, say, a 32GB
USB flash? Let's say 8 single layer DVDs which works out at around $16
for each DVD (using the price list I just supplied above). For that
money you'd be better off going out and buying another copy of the DVD
from a DVD rental shop which always sell pre-loved DVDs. Compare this to
using another blank DVD to burn the original. The cost is even more if
you talking dual-layer DVDs- half as many as the single layer making
each DVD cost around $32 each.

With CDs on the other hand it's a different story. The CDs are less than
700MB each so you can store quite a few bits of music on a memory stick.

But....you did read the article about ReRAM (memristors) which are due
out in 2013, that's only 2+years away? Use some interim measures to
backup your CDs/DVDs and then splurge out in 2013! :-)

BC

--
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Old 09-12-2010, 06:15 AM
Ric Moore
 
Default Backing up CD / DVD Media

On Sun, 2010-09-12 at 12:17 +1000, Basil Chupin wrote:

> But....you did read the article about ReRAM (memristors) which are due
> out in 2013, that's only 2+years away? Use some interim measures to
> backup your CDs/DVDs and then splurge out in 2013! :-)

That's assuming we all make it past 2012. Ric


--
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"There are two Great Sins in the world...
..the Sin of Ignorance, and the Sin of Stupidity.
Only the former may be overcome." R.I.P. Dad.
Linux user# 44256


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