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Old 01-20-2008, 01:07 PM
Luca Ferrari
 
Default /proc/sys/kernel/shmmax

Hi all,
using a 7.1 server I tried to increment the shmmax value in the proc file, but
it seems I cannot get more than 600 MB. I tried to fix it to 1GB but the
system still has 600MB, is it a parameter fixed in the ubuntu kernel? Is
there a reason for this limitation?

Thanks,
Luca

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Old 01-20-2008, 01:32 PM
"Gérard BIGOT"
 
Default /proc/sys/kernel/shmmax

On Jan 20, 2008 3:07 PM, Luca Ferrari <fluca1978@infinito.it> wrote:

Hi all,
using a 7.1 server I tried to increment the shmmax value in the proc file, but
it seems I cannot get more than 600 MB. I tried to fix it to 1GB but the
system still has 600MB, is it a parameter fixed in the ubuntu kernel?



To change the value SHMMAX, you can use either of the following three methods:


This is method I use most often. This method sets the SHMMAX
on startup by inserting the following kernel parameter
in the /etc/sysctl.conf startup file:
# echo "kernel.shmmax=2147483648" >> /etc/sysctl.conf



If you wanted to dynamically alter the value of SHMMAX without rebooting
the machine, you can make this change directly to the /proc file system.
This command can be made permanent by putting it into the /etc/rc.local
startup file:
# echo "2147483648" > /proc/sys/kernel/shmmax



You can also use the sysctl command to change the value of SHMMAX:
# sysctl -w kernel.shmmax=2147483648
From
http://www.idevelopment.info/data/Oracle/DBA_tips/Linux/LINUX_8.shtml , obviously ...

G.
*



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Old 01-21-2008, 06:45 AM
Luca Ferrari
 
Default /proc/sys/kernel/shmmax

On Sunday 20 January 2008 Gérard BIGOT's cat, walking on the keyboard, wrote:
>
> - You can also use the sysctl command to change the value of SHMMAX:
>
>
> # *sysctl -w kernel.shmmax=2147483648*

Uhm...I tied this with 2GB but the system (cat /proc/sys/kernel/shmmax) shows
me 1GB value, that's the strange why I asked in mailing list.

Luca

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Old 01-21-2008, 02:22 PM
"Gérard BIGOT"
 
Default /proc/sys/kernel/shmmax

On Jan 21, 2008 8:45 AM, Luca Ferrari <fluca1978@infinito.it> wrote:

On Sunday 20 January 2008 Gérard BIGOT's cat, walking on the keyboard, wrote:
>
> * * *- You can also use the sysctl command to change the value of SHMMAX:
>
>
> * *# *sysctl -w kernel.shmmax=2147483648*


Uhm...I tied this with 2GB but the system (cat /proc/sys/kernel/shmmax) shows
me 1GB value, that's the strange why I asked in mailing list.

Did you use sudo? #, in* ubuntu case means 'please use sudo before this Command'.


Without sudo, it'll fail.

G.


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Old 01-21-2008, 02:48 PM
Nils Kassube
 
Default /proc/sys/kernel/shmmax

Gérard BIGOT wrote:
> Did you use sudo? #, in ubuntu case means 'please use sudo before this
> Command'.

That's the first time I read something about this special meaning. It
seems very strange to me, can you tell me where it is documented? And how
should I know, if I'm new to Ubuntu?


Nils

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Old 01-21-2008, 03:25 PM
"Gérard BIGOT"
 
Default /proc/sys/kernel/shmmax

On Jan 21, 2008 4:48 PM, Nils Kassube <kassube@gmx.net> wrote:

Gérard BIGOT wrote:
> Did you use sudo? #, in *ubuntu case means 'please use sudo before this
> Command'.

That's the first time I read something about this special meaning. It

seems very strange to me, can you tell me where it is documented? And how
should I know, if I'm new to Ubuntu?
It may be said in a strange way. But, Ubuntu doesn't open Root account, the one noted by # at the prompt, instead of your $.


The only way to run commands with root rights, is to add sudo at the beginning of the command.

For HowTos not done for ubuntu, they don't special mention this particuliar use. So as a mnemotechnic thing, I noticed this.


G.



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Old 01-21-2008, 03:27 PM
"Gérard BIGOT"
 
Default /proc/sys/kernel/shmmax

On Jan 21, 2008 5:25 PM, Gérard BIGOT <gerard.bigot@gmail.com> wrote:



On Jan 21, 2008 4:48 PM, Nils Kassube <kassube@gmx.net> wrote:


Gérard BIGOT wrote:
> Did you use sudo? #, in *ubuntu case means 'please use sudo before this
> Command'.

That's the first time I read something about this special meaning. It

seems very strange to me, can you tell me where it is documented? And how
should I know, if I'm new to Ubuntu?
It may be said in a strange way. But, Ubuntu doesn't open Root account, the one noted by # at the prompt, instead of your $.


The only way to run commands with root rights, is to add sudo at the beginning of the command.

For HowTos not done for ubuntu, they don't special mention this particuliar use. So as a mnemotechnic thing, I noticed this.

That one ?
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo



G.





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Old 01-21-2008, 04:29 PM
Nils Kassube
 
Default /proc/sys/kernel/shmmax

Gérard BIGOT wrote:
> On Jan 21, 2008 4:48 PM, Nils Kassube <kassube@gmx.net> wrote:
> > Gérard BIGOT wrote:
> > > Did you use sudo? #, in ubuntu case means 'please use sudo before
> > > this Command'.
> >
> > That's the first time I read something about this special meaning. It
> > seems very strange to me, can you tell me where it is documented? And
> > how should I know, if I'm new to Ubuntu?
>
> It may be said in a strange way. But, Ubuntu doesn't open Root account,
> the one noted by # at the prompt, instead of your $.

OK, there may be a '#' at the prompt, if you run a root shell, but then
you don't need sudo. And if I see a line starting with '#', it is a
comment line for me, because that's what a '#' is used for in a shell
script.


Nils

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Old 01-21-2008, 05:33 PM
"Gérard BIGOT"
 
Default /proc/sys/kernel/shmmax

On Jan 21, 2008 6:29 PM, Nils Kassube <kassube@gmx.net> wrote:

Gérard BIGOT wrote:
> On Jan 21, 2008 4:48 PM, Nils Kassube <kassube@gmx.net> wrote:
> > Gérard BIGOT wrote:
> > > Did you use sudo? #, in *ubuntu case means 'please use sudo before

> > > this Command'.
> >
> > That's the first time I read something about this special meaning. It
> > seems very strange to me, can you tell me where it is documented? And

> > how should I know, if I'm new to Ubuntu?
>
> It may be said in a strange way. But, Ubuntu doesn't open Root account,
> the one noted by # at the prompt, instead of your $.


OK, there may be a '#' at the prompt, if you run a root shell, but then
you don't need sudo. And if I see a line starting with '#', it is a
comment line for me, because that's what a '#' is used for in a shell

script.
simple :

open a shell. You're logged as yourself, whatever it is. Look at the prompt. A $

type 'sudo -i' (man sudo to explain the meaning of -i) on that prompt.


give your own login.

Look at the prompt. A #

Magic.

Hence

$* : You
# : The root account.

That's why they give the # at the beginning of the command line. It means 'it's supposed to be run as root'. And the way to do it in Ubuntu is to add sudo at the beginning of the command.


Try it, you'll see.

G.


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Old 01-21-2008, 05:34 PM
"Gérard BIGOT"
 
Default /proc/sys/kernel/shmmax

On Jan 21, 2008 6:29 PM, Nils Kassube <kassube@gmx.net> wrote:

Gérard BIGOT wrote:
> On Jan 21, 2008 4:48 PM, Nils Kassube <kassube@gmx.net> wrote:
> > Gérard BIGOT wrote:
> > > Did you use sudo? #, in *ubuntu case means 'please use sudo before

> > > this Command'.
> >
> > That's the first time I read something about this special meaning. It
> > seems very strange to me, can you tell me where it is documented? And

> > how should I know, if I'm new to Ubuntu?
>
> It may be said in a strange way. But, Ubuntu doesn't open Root account,
> the one noted by # at the prompt, instead of your $.


OK, there may be a '#' at the prompt, if you run a root shell, but then
you don't need sudo. And if I see a line starting with '#', it is a
comment line for me, because that's what a '#' is used for in a shell

script.

You're right about # in the shell script context, but there is no prompt in a script ...

G.


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