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Old 11-18-2007, 07:37 PM
bill purvis
 
Default problem with a USB serial chip device

On Saturday 17 November 2007, Nils Kassube wrote:
> bill purvis wrote:
> > I recently bought a small board with USB chip and cpu on it. This
> > worked fine on my Windows machine with the supplied driver and
> > terminal emulator, but wouldn't work on my Linux system (Mandrake
> > 10.1). This was one of the main things prompting me to switch to
> > Ubuntu. According to the supplier, when you plug it in it should appear
> > as /dev/ttsyUSB0, which it did on Mandrake, but on Ubuntu the only
> > 'new' devices are:
> >
> > /dev/usbdev2.3_ep00 ,
> > /dev/usbdev2.3_ep02 and
> > /dev/usbdev2.3_ep81
> >
> > these disappear when I unplug the device. It should act like a
> > simple serial terminal.
> >
> > lsusb produces:
> > Bus 002 Device 003: ID 0403:6001 Future Technology Devices
> > International, Ltd 8-bit FIFO
> >
> > amongst the other devices that I expect.
> > This seems OK, but how can I get it to set up
> > /dev/ttsyUSB0 for me?
>
> Maybe this helps in your case too:
> <https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/gnome-panel/+question/7438>
>
>
> Nils
Thanks, that's exactly the problem. Cured by:

apt-get remove brltty

Not that I have anything against blind people, but I think installing
this by default is one of the few things I have against Ubuntu - they
do seem to install an awful lot of things that I really have no need
for....

I'd much prefer a good basic install and the add in the extras, rather
than install almost everything (expect the bits I want). 8-)

Bill
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| email: bil@beeb.net |
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Old 11-18-2007, 08:50 PM
Nils Kassube
 
Default problem with a USB serial chip device

bill purvis wrote:
> I'd much prefer a good basic install and the add in the extras, rather
> than install almost everything (expect the bits I want). 8-)

I think we don't agree here. It reminds me of my very first Linux
installation. It was a slow 386 machine and I was asked for every single
package if I wanted it installed. I had a good knowledge of my hardware,
but for many packages I didn't know if I needed it or not. Therefore I
probably installed much more than necessary - it took nearly an entire
day until the installation was finished because of those many questions.
I think it is much better to install a lot more than necessary without
any questions, especially if the distribution wants to be usefull for
people who don't already know anything about Linux.


Nils

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Old 11-18-2007, 10:23 PM
Peter Garrett
 
Default problem with a USB serial chip device

On Sun, 18 Nov 2007 20:37:17 +0000
bill purvis <bil@beeb.net> wrote:

> I'd much prefer a good basic install and the add in the extras, rather
> than install almost everything (expect the bits I want). 8-)

Here you go:

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Installation/MinimalCD

Have fun

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Old 11-19-2007, 03:14 PM
Derek Broughton
 
Default problem with a USB serial chip device

Nils Kassube wrote:

> bill purvis wrote:
>> I'd much prefer a good basic install and the add in the extras, rather
>> than install almost everything (expect the bits I want). 8-)
>
> I think we don't agree here. It reminds me of my very first Linux
> installation. It was a slow 386 machine and I was asked for every single
> package if I wanted it installed. I had a good knowledge of my hardware,
> but for many packages I didn't know if I needed it or not. Therefore I
> probably installed much more than necessary - it took nearly an entire
> day until the installation was finished because of those many questions.
> I think it is much better to install a lot more than necessary without
> any questions, especially if the distribution wants to be usefull for
> people who don't already know anything about Linux.

But it would be even nicer if it could make some reasonable guesses about
what is needed by checking the hardware, and ask some simple questions
like - do you need support for more than one language?

I've just solved my ekiga problem by installing libpt-plugins-v4l2 - which
_isn't_ installed by default, because ekiga only needs one of the video
plugins, and v4l2 is the last choice. Since the webcam is built-in to the
laptop, it _could_ have known that the plugin was needed in the first
place. (Note, it's entirely possible the Ubuntu install really _would_
have done this, because I installed ekiga over Kubuntu - so it's just an
example, but I've seen similar problems on install, and this is also needed
_after_ the install to get real plug-and-play)
--
derek


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