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Old 01-05-2008, 12:01 AM
Matthew Flaschen
 
Default swap space

Shane McKinley wrote:
> Ekk, I didn't know people still used that. Always seemed flaky to me.

I find that statement kind of funny. True, swap used to be flaky. But,
luckily, the developers didn't just give up; they actually made it work
(for most people)!.

Matt Flaschen

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Old 01-05-2008, 12:02 AM
Matthew Flaschen
 
Default swap space

Derek Broughton wrote:
> By definition /tmp/ should always be assumed (though not guaranteed) to be
> empty after a boot. I _have_ seen apps that didn't handle that correctly,
> but they are buggy...

Another option is to use tmpfs, if you have some RAM to spare.

Matt Flaschen

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Old 01-05-2008, 02:02 AM
"Liam Proven"
 
Default swap space

On 19/12/2007, Michael.Coll-Barth@verizonwireless.com
<Michael.Coll-Barth@verizonwireless.com> wrote:
> All,
>
> I am in the process of building a new machine that will have several
> different OSes installed for different purposes. WIN XP, Ubuntu 7.10
> and Fedora 8 are already installed and working with at least two other
> flavors of Linux coming. Only one OS will be booted at any given time,
> no VM Ware here...
>
> The question of the day; can I safely have a single swap space that is
> shared by the different flavors of Linux? Do I need to do anything
> special to the space and or settings of the OS to do this?

I do this routinely. I have shared a single swap partition between at
least 2 or 3 of the following on at least 3 of my machines:
* Ubuntu 4/5/6/7
* Xandros 2/3/4
* SuSE 9/10
* Mandriva 9/10/2007
... and more besides. I review and write about software for a living,
amongst other things. Most of my PCs boot into at least 2 different
distros: that way, if one gets screwed up, I can use a different one
to fix it.

However, the caveat you've been given applies: *do not* use
hibernation if several distros share a single swap partition. If you
restart a different distro, Bad Things would be very likely to happen
and might destroy both distros.

That one caveat aside, you should be fine.

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Old 01-05-2008, 01:25 PM
Derek Broughton
 
Default swap space

Matthew Flaschen wrote:

> Derek Broughton wrote:
>> By definition /tmp/ should always be assumed (though not guaranteed) to
>> be empty after a boot. I _have_ seen apps that didn't handle that
>> correctly, but they are buggy...
>
> Another option is to use tmpfs, if you have some RAM to spare.

You don't even need RAM - tmpfs uses virtual memory, so I make a big swap
file and allocate a GB to /tmp.

But what I meant is that the occasional app actually checks for a file to
have been left in /tmp when it starts up - and if you've rebooted there
shouldn't be one (and certainly won't if /tmp is on a tmpfs).
--
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Old 01-05-2008, 01:35 PM
Derek Broughton
 
Default swap space

Liam Proven wrote:

> However, the caveat you've been given applies: *do not* use
> hibernation if several distros share a single swap partition. If you
> restart a different distro, Bad Things would be very likely to happen
> and might destroy both distros.

Bad Things shouldn't happen. You boot, it checks swap for a hibernation
signature, compares it to the running kernel, and aborts the resume if the
kernels differ. I'm not sure what it does you boot the same kernel with
different root partitions (I'm not stupid enough to try...), but one would
hope it does the same.

In any case, even if the resume is aborted, you're then booting into a
situation where it's as if you powered the machine off without going
through a proper shutdown, but all the filesystems were synced before
hibernating so nothing terrible should happen.
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Old 01-05-2008, 03:33 PM
"Liam Proven"
 
Default swap space

On 05/01/2008, Derek Broughton <news@pointerstop.ca> wrote:
> Liam Proven wrote:
>
> > However, the caveat you've been given applies: *do not* use
> > hibernation if several distros share a single swap partition. If you
> > restart a different distro, Bad Things would be very likely to happen
> > and might destroy both distros.
>
> Bad Things shouldn't happen. You boot, it checks swap for a hibernation
> signature, compares it to the running kernel, and aborts the resume if the
> kernels differ. I'm not sure what it does you boot the same kernel with
> different root partitions (I'm not stupid enough to try...), but one would
> hope it does the same.
>
> In any case, even if the resume is aborted, you're then booting into a
> situation where it's as if you powered the machine off without going
> through a proper shutdown, but all the filesystems were synced before
> hibernating so nothing terrible should happen.

Hmm! Cogently argued. I confess I've not tried this; I only have 1 PC
notebook specced well enough to run Linux and it won't due to a broken
ACPI implementation. So, I've reluctantly reverted to Win2K Pro on it.
Never tried Linux suspend & resume; it doesn't work on that hardware.

But you make your point well, so I bow to your superior knowledge!

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Old 02-21-2009, 09:23 AM
GMS S
 
Default Swap space

Hi,
Can anyone tell me how can I increase my space to 1GB or over 1GB?

Typing "df -h"
Filesystem*********** Size* Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda6************* 22G** 11G** 11G* 51% /
tmpfs**************** 501M* 544K* 500M** 1% /dev/shm
/dev/sda1************* 25G* 8.3G** 17G* 34% /media/disk
/dev/sda5************* 28G** 12G** 16G* 44% /media/disk-1

Typing "fdisk -l"
Disk /dev/sda: 80.0 GB, 80025280000
bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9729 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x29032902

** Device Boot***** Start******** End***** Blocks** Id* System
/dev/sda1** *********** 1******* 3188*** 25607578+** c* W95 FAT32 (LBA)
/dev/sda2*********** 3189******* 9728*** 52532550*** f* W95 Ext'd (LBA)
/dev/sda5*********** 3189******* 6757*** 28667961*** 7*
HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda6*********** 6758******* 9562*** 22531131** 83* Linux
/dev/sda7*********** 9563******* 9728**** 1333363+* 82* Linux swap / Solaris

Typing "swapon -s"
Filename*** *** *** *** Type*** *** Size*** Used*** Priority
/dev/sda7****************************** partition*** 1333352*** 68*** -1



I am using Fedora 10,1GB ram,80 HD,Intel(R) Pentium(R) D* CPU
2.66GHz..

Thanks.




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Old 02-21-2009, 09:27 AM
Frank Murphy
 
Default Swap space

GMS S wrote:
> Hi,
> Can anyone tell me how can I increase my space to 1GB or over 1GB?
>
> Typing "df -h"
> Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
> /dev/sda6 22G 11G 11G 51% /
> tmpfs

Use a usb-stick, formatted as swap.
It will be made use of on boot up.
I have four machines using them (up to 4gb sticks)
ymmv

Frank

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Old 02-21-2009, 09:32 AM
Thierry
 
Default Swap space

GMS S a crit :
> Can anyone tell me how can I increase my space to 1GB or over 1GB?

Please do not send html emails
you can either get rid of windows and use that space (I know, cheeky)
or look at adding a swap file.
http://fcp.surfsite.org/modules/smartfaq/faq.php?faqid=502

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Old 02-21-2009, 12:56 PM
chedi toueiti
 
Default Swap space

Hi,

You can try this:
1- Create a swap file (use this if you can't change your partition layout) via the command:
dd if=/dev/zero of=/tmp/swap_file bs=1024M count=1
2- format the swap file with :

mkswap /tmp/swap
3- add the new swap file swap system
/sbin/swapon /tmp/swap_file
4- make the swap load on boot loading
echo /sbin/swapon /tmp/swap_file >> /etc/rc.local

Regards


On Sat, Feb 21, 2009 at 11:23 AM, GMS S <gmspro@yahoo.com> wrote:


Hi,
Can anyone tell me how can I increase my space to 1GB or over 1GB?

Typing "df -h"
Filesystem*********** Size* Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda6************* 22G** 11G** 11G* 51% /
tmpfs**************** 501M* 544K* 500M** 1% /dev/shm

/dev/sda1************* 25G* 8.3G** 17G* 34% /media/disk
/dev/sda5************* 28G** 12G** 16G* 44% /media/disk-1

Typing "fdisk -l"
Disk /dev/sda: 80.0 GB, 80025280000
bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9729 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x29032902

** Device Boot***** Start******** End***** Blocks** Id* System
/dev/sda1** *********** 1******* 3188*** 25607578+** c* W95 FAT32 (LBA)

/dev/sda2*********** 3189******* 9728*** 52532550*** f* W95 Ext'd (LBA)
/dev/sda5*********** 3189******* 6757*** 28667961*** 7*
HPFS/NTFS
/dev/sda6*********** 6758******* 9562*** 22531131** 83* Linux
/dev/sda7*********** 9563******* 9728**** 1333363+* 82* Linux swap / Solaris

Typing "swapon -s"
Filename*** *** *** *** Type*** *** Size*** Used*** Priority

/dev/sda7****************************** partition*** 1333352*** 68*** -1



I am using Fedora 10,1GB ram,80 HD,Intel(R) Pentium(R) D* CPU
2.66GHz..

Thanks.





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