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Old 11-04-2009, 12:10 PM
Dotan Cohen
 
Default How to call a move from 9.04 to 9.10 as a new install?

> That's called a fresh install.
>
>

So I would say "I fresh installed from 9.04 to 9.10 and XYZ stopped working"?

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Old 11-04-2009, 12:11 PM
Dotan Cohen
 
Default How to call a move from 9.04 to 9.10 as a new install?

> I think you missed the point - some people think that 9.10 is worse than
> 9.04 and therefore they would consider it a downgrade.
>

If that was the point then I remind the GP that this is a technical
list and kindly request him to refrain from hijacking threads and
trolling.


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Old 11-04-2009, 12:26 PM
John Scott
 
Default How to call a move from 9.04 to 9.10 as a new install?

-----Original Message-----
From: Dotan Cohen <dotancohen@gmail.com>
To: ubuntu-users. <ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com>
Sent: Wed, Nov 4, 2009 12:56 pm
Subject: How to call a move from 9.04 to 9.10 as a new install?

>How should one call a move from Ubuntu 9.04 to Ubuntu 9.10 as a new
>install? The word "upgrade" seems reserved for the procedure of
replacing 9.04 files with 9.10 files. But in my case I wiped the drive
and reinstalled everything, then restored personal files from backup.
What is the term for this?

>Thanks.

--
>Dotan Cohen


Technically, you upgraded from 9.04 to 9.10 by using wipe and fresh
install as the upgrade method. The term "upgrade" implies a transition
from one thing to another. For example if you said that you decided to
upgrade from a 3 series BMW to a 5 series BMW, no one would expect you
to gut the car and salvage the frame and wheels, then replace then
engine, seats, body, and feature set of the car but making it
technically the same car because of the chassis number. Everyone would
assume you traded in your old one and purchased a new one. This is both
a new car purchase--and an upgrade by way of trade-in.

So here we have several important points:
1. An upgrade need not retain something of old.
2. The terms Upgrade and Fresh install need not be mutually exclusive.
3. Anyone who comments on this has too much free time on his hands.

Regards,

John

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Old 11-04-2009, 12:37 PM
Dotan Cohen
 
Default How to call a move from 9.04 to 9.10 as a new install?

> Technically, you upgraded from 9.04 to 9.10 by using wipe and fresh
> install as the upgrade method. The term "upgrade" implies a transition
> *from one thing to another. For example if you said that you decided to
> upgrade from a 3 series BMW to a 5 series BMW, no one would expect you
> to gut the car and salvage the frame and wheels, then replace then
> engine, seats, body, and feature set of the car but making it
> technically the same car because of the chassis number. Everyone would
> assume you traded in your old one and purchased a new one. This is both
> a new car purchase--and an upgrade by way of trade-in.
>

The problem is that Ubuntu uses the same word "upgrade" for a
different process: that of gutting and salvaging the BMW. Therefore to
avoid ambiguity I ask what the correct word is for the procedure I
described.


> So here we have several important points:
> 1. An upgrade need not retain something of old.

However in this case the term upgrade is ambiguous.


> 3. Anyone who comments on this has too much free time on his hands.
>

While you may have too much free time on your hands, it is important
for those of us responsible for maintaining Ubuntu installations to
differentiate between freshly installed systems and those which were
converted from one version to another.


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Old 11-04-2009, 12:38 PM
Rashkae
 
Default How to call a move from 9.04 to 9.10 as a new install?

Dotan Cohen wrote:
>> That's called a fresh install.
>>
>>
>
> So I would say "I fresh installed from 9.04 to 9.10 and XYZ stopped working"?
>

No, you say you installed (or fresh installed, for clarity) 9.10 and XYZ
doesn't work, whereas it did in 9.04. You can word that however you
like, but there is no '9.04' to '9.10.' You erased 9.04; you didn't
transform it into anything.

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Old 11-04-2009, 12:42 PM
"Cybe R. Wizard"
 
Default How to call a move from 9.04 to 9.10 as a new install?

On Wed, 4 Nov 2009 13:56:41 +0200
Dotan Cohen <dotancohen@gmail.com> wrote:

> How should one call a move from Ubuntu 9.04 to Ubuntu 9.10 as a new
> install? The word "upgrade" seems reserved for the procedure of
> replacing 9.04 files with 9.10 files. But in my case I wiped the drive
> and reinstalled everything, then restored personal files from backup.
> What is the term for this?
>
> Thanks.
>

That's a new installation with a re-installation of personal files.

Cybe R. Wizard
--
When Windows are opened the bugs come in.
Winduhs

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Old 11-04-2009, 01:09 PM
John Scott
 
Default How to call a move from 9.04 to 9.10 as a new install?

-----Original Message-----
From: Dotan Cohen <dotancohen@gmail.com>
Sent: Wed, Nov 4, 2009 2:37 pm
Subject: Re: How to call a move from 9.04 to 9.10 as a new install?
> Technically, you upgraded from 9.04 to 9.10 by using wipe and fresh
> install as the upgrade method. The term "upgrade" implies a transition
> *from one thing to another. For example if you said that you decided
to
> upgrade from a 3 series BMW to a 5 series BMW, no one would expect you
> to gut the car and salvage the frame and wheels, then replace then
> engine, seats, body, and feature set of the car but making it
> technically the same car because of the chassis number. Everyone would
> assume you traded in your old one and purchased a new one. This is
both
> a new car purchase--and an upgrade by way of trade-in.
>

>The problem is that Ubuntu uses the same word "upgrade" for a
>different process: that of gutting and salvaging the BMW. Therefore to
>avoid ambiguity I ask what the correct word is for the procedure I
>described.

That is my point. The term upgrade cannot be used this way and not be
ambiguous. To disambiguate, you must say:
Upgraded via "In-place Upgrade" or "Wipe and clean Install"
If it is a first time install, that is a First-Time Install of Ubuntu
or New Install depending on the context.


>> So here we have several important points:
>>1. An upgrade need not retain something of old.
>>
>However in this case the term upgrade is ambiguous.

No, the term is NOT ambiguous unless there is a doubt whether or not a
transition has taken place. A statement that an upgrade has been done
from something to something leaves no doubt about that. If you want to
leave no doubt as to the method, you must emphatically state the
method. Upgrade does not emphatically imply that no clean install has
been done so if that is your question, you still have your answer.

Don't believe me, buy Windows 7 Upgrade. You can do an in place upgrade
of Vista or clean install; the Windows installer drives both processes
but one preserves your data and the other does not.

> 3. Anyone who comments on this has too much free time on his hands.
>

>While you may have too much free time on your hands, it is important
>for those of us responsible for maintaining Ubuntu installations to
>differentiate between freshly installed systems and those which were
>converted from one version to another.

I realize this. I thought it would be obvious that this was a joke
given that I was...commenting...on it. I obviously underestimated your
seriousness with the subject matter so please forgive my unwelcome
humor.




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Old 11-04-2009, 02:56 PM
Dotan Cohen
 
Default How to call a move from 9.04 to 9.10 as a new install?

>> So I would say "I fresh installed from 9.04 to 9.10 and XYZ stopped working"?
>>
>
> No, you say you installed (or fresh installed, for clarity) 9.10 and XYZ
> doesn't work, whereas it did in 9.04. *You can word that however you
> like, but there is no '9.04' to '9.10.' *You erased 9.04; you didn't
> transform it into anything.
>

That is a good point, thanks. I mention 9.04 because:
1) XYZ worked there, and
2) The user's config files are from 9.04 which may or may not be
compatible with whatever version of XYZ is installed in 9.10


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Old 11-04-2009, 02:59 PM
Dotan Cohen
 
Default How to call a move from 9.04 to 9.10 as a new install?

>>The problem is that Ubuntu uses the same word "upgrade" for a
>>different process: that of gutting and salvaging the BMW. Therefore to
>>avoid ambiguity I ask what the correct word is for the procedure I
>>described.
>
> That is my point. The term upgrade cannot be used this way and not be
> ambiguous. To disambiguate, you must say:
> Upgraded via "In-place Upgrade" or "Wipe and clean Install"
> If it is a first time install, that is a First-Time Install of Ubuntu
> or New Install depending on the context.
>

I see, thanks.


> Don't believe me, buy Windows 7 Upgrade. You can do an in place upgrade
> of Vista or clean install; the Windows installer drives both processes
> but one preserves your data and the other does not.
>

It's been a long time since I've let Microsoft's definitions of
technical terms influence my option. I think that in reference to
Windows 7, the term "upgrade" refers to the price one pays, not to the
technical details of the operating system.


>> 3. Anyone who comments on this has too much free time on his hands.
>>
>
>>While you may have too much free time on your hands, it is important
>>for those of us responsible for maintaining Ubuntu installations to
>>differentiate between freshly installed systems and those which were
>>converted from one version to another.
>
> I realize this. I thought it would be obvious that this was a joke
> given that I was...commenting...on it. I obviously underestimated your
> seriousness with the subject matter so please forgive my unwelcome
> humor.
>

And please forgive my rashness. 1:1 we're even! Thanks!


--
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Old 11-04-2009, 03:06 PM
Rashkae
 
Default How to call a move from 9.04 to 9.10 as a new install?

Dotan Cohen wrote:
>>> So I would say "I fresh installed from 9.04 to 9.10 and XYZ stopped working"?
>>>
>> No, you say you installed (or fresh installed, for clarity) 9.10 and XYZ
>> doesn't work, whereas it did in 9.04. You can word that however you
>> like, but there is no '9.04' to '9.10.' You erased 9.04; you didn't
>> transform it into anything.
>>
>
> That is a good point, thanks. I mention 9.04 because:
> 1) XYZ worked there, and
> 2) The user's config files are from 9.04 which may or may not be
> compatible with whatever version of XYZ is installed in 9.10
>
>

Always test with a new user account to narrow down whether a problem is
in the config files or not.


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