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Old 10-27-2009, 11:54 PM
Joshua Solomin
 
Default turning a desktop install into a server

Hmm, do you think I could get to the point of networking enabled and
remote logins working (and things like samba turned on) with just a
keyboard plugged in? If so, I could keep one handy just for when the
machine needs to be rebooted (it's a lot better than also needing a
monitor).


On Tue, Oct 27, 2009 at 5:48 PM, J Bickhard <jbickhard@gmail.com> wrote:
> Most of the BIOSes that I've seen won't power the computer on past
> POST without a working keyboard plugged in (keyboard error, press F1
> to continue).
> Could rip the circuit board out of an old keyboard and just leave that
> connected so that the BIOS "sees" a real keyboard.
>
> Jake (dats me)
>
>
>
>
> On Tue, Oct 27, 2009 at 7:35 PM, Joshua Solomin <jsolomin@gmail.com> wrote:
>> Right, I have ssh server installed, and turned on remote access, and
>> am running a samba fileshare. *So I can successfully SSH to/VNC
>> to/access files on the Ubuntu server. *BUT: I can seemingly only do
>> this after I've actually logged into the Ubuntu box locally, which is
>> a problem if I want the box sitting in a corner with no display or
>> keyboard/mouse. *So, the question is how I can get the remote access
>> to be available immediately after flipping on the power on the Ubuntu
>> box, without needing to log in locally first.
>>
>> thanks,
>> Joshua
>>
>>
>> On Tue, Oct 27, 2009 at 5:31 PM, Ashley Benton <chuaukantli@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>> On Tue, Oct 27, 2009 at 4:54 PM, Joshua Solomin <jsolomin@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> I recently installed the Ubuntu desktop edition, and got things
>>>> working; but what I really want to do is to make it a server-like box
>>>> that is exclusively logged into remotely (from other machines on my
>>>> home network). *I powered it down, unplugged monitor/keyboard/mouse,
>>>> put it in its new location, and turned it on -- but as far as I could
>>>> tell, the (wireless) networking didn't even start; I had to lug over
>>>> the periphals and plug them in, then log in to Ubuntu, then unplug
>>>> them again.
>>>>
>>>> So now I have a box that I can remotely access (and on which I'm
>>>> actually still logged in locally). *But what if I have to reboot --
>>>> how can I set it up such that it doesn't need the peripherals at all,
>>>> and I can log into it remotely without having to log in locally first?
>>>>
>>>
>>> The easiest way is to allow remote access like that you can log in from the
>>> computers allowed. If I remember you should find it in
>>> system...something..don't have my computer in front of me sorry. I would
>>> think that later you will want to create a ssh connection or samba
>>> connection which work differently and use less CPU on the computer you use
>>> to log into your server.
>>>
>>> Good luck
>>>
>>> Meg
>>>
>>>>
>>>> thanks,
>>>> Joshua
>>>>
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>>>
>>>
>>
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>

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Old 10-28-2009, 12:14 AM
David Curtis
 
Default turning a desktop install into a server

On Tue, 27 Oct 2009 16:54:54 -0700
Joshua Solomin <jsolomin@gmail.com> wrote:

> I recently installed the Ubuntu desktop edition, and got things
> working; but what I really want to do is to make it a server-like box
> that is exclusively logged into remotely (from other machines on my
> home network). I powered it down, unplugged monitor/keyboard/mouse,
> put it in its new location, and turned it on -- but as far as I could
> tell, the (wireless) networking didn't even start; I had to lug over
> the periphals and plug them in, then log in to Ubuntu, then unplug
> them again.
>
> So now I have a box that I can remotely access (and on which I'm
> actually still logged in locally). But what if I have to reboot --
> how can I set it up such that it doesn't need the peripherals at all,
> and I can log into it remotely without having to log in locally first?

You need to configure networking on boot in the /etc/network/interfaces
file.

http://nixcraft.com/ubuntu-debian/13278-etc-network-interfaces-wireless-wifi-example.html

Dave

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Old 10-28-2009, 12:27 AM
Rashkae
 
Default turning a desktop install into a server

Joshua Solomin wrote:
> I recently installed the Ubuntu desktop edition, and got things
> working; but what I really want to do is to make it a server-like box
> that is exclusively logged into remotely (from other machines on my
> home network). I powered it down, unplugged monitor/keyboard/mouse,
> put it in its new location, and turned it on -- but as far as I could
> tell, the (wireless) networking didn't even start; I had to lug over
> the periphals and plug them in, then log in to Ubuntu, then unplug
> them again.
>
> So now I have a box that I can remotely access (and on which I'm
> actually still logged in locally). But what if I have to reboot --
> how can I set it up such that it doesn't need the peripherals at all,
> and I can log into it remotely without having to log in locally first?
>
> thanks,
> Joshua
>

First you'll want to remove network manager. If you really plan on
using wireless networks, I can't really help you all that much.. I would
search for the Linux Wireless how too for tips on how to configure
Wireless on a system level. (I think perhaps WICD is also able to do
this, but I never tested it.)

Then install OpenSSH server package, which will let you log in to your
system remotely from SSH.


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Old 10-28-2009, 12:29 AM
Rashkae
 
Default turning a desktop install into a server

J Bickhard wrote:
> Most of the BIOSes that I've seen won't power the computer on past
> POST without a working keyboard plugged in (keyboard error, press F1
> to continue).
> Could rip the circuit board out of an old keyboard and just leave that
> connected so that the BIOS "sees" a real keyboard.
>
> Jake (dats me)
>
>
>

All BIOS' I've ever seen (and I swear by now, that has to be damn near
all of them) have a configurable option to turn off Halt on Error,
exactly for this reason.

Also, on ATX systems, look for a "AC ON" option, and set that to either
Power On, or Last State. That will allow the pc to turn itself back on
after a power failure.


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Old 10-28-2009, 03:29 AM
Ian Coetzee
 
Default turning a desktop install into a server

On 28/10/2009 01:54, Joshua Solomin wrote:
> I recently installed the Ubuntu desktop edition, and got things
> working; but what I really want to do is to make it a server-like box
> that is exclusively logged into remotely (from other machines on my
> home network). I powered it down, unplugged monitor/keyboard/mouse,
> put it in its new location, and turned it on -- but as far as I could
> tell, the (wireless) networking didn't even start; I had to lug over
> the periphals and plug them in, then log in to Ubuntu, then unplug
> them again.
>
> So now I have a box that I can remotely access (and on which I'm
> actually still logged in locally). But what if I have to reboot --
> how can I set it up such that it doesn't need the peripherals at all,
> and I can log into it remotely without having to log in locally first?
>
> thanks,
> Joshua
>
>
Hi joshua

The easiest way would be to enable auto login on the box.

System > Administration > Login Window

[type your password]

Security > Enable Automatic Login

HtH

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Old 10-28-2009, 01:49 PM
Ray Leventhal
 
Default turning a desktop install into a server

Rashkae wrote:
> Joshua Solomin wrote:
<snip>
>>
>> So now I have a box that I can remotely access (and on which I'm
>> actually still logged in locally). But what if I have to reboot --
>> how can I set it up such that it doesn't need the peripherals at all,
>> and I can log into it remotely without having to log in locally first?
>>
>> thanks,
>> Joshua
>>
>
> First you'll want to remove network manager. If you really plan on
> using wireless networks, I can't really help you all that much.. I would
> search for the Linux Wireless how too for tips on how to configure
> Wireless on a system level. (I think perhaps WICD is also able to do
> this, but I never tested it.)
>
> Then install OpenSSH server package, which will let you log in to your
> system remotely from SSH.
>
>

Hi Josh,
Just adding my .02 to Rashkae's commentary about WICD. NM requires
login, wicd doesn't. That *should* get you past the hump of having a
user logged in before networking starts.

Of course, you may opt to hard-code your IPs using
/etc/network/interfaces as David mentioned in this thread...were it a
server, that's likely the way I'd do it.

As for the keyboard issue...that's been addressed. Set your BIOS to
ignore kb errors on boot and you should be where you want to be.

Of course, another way to go would be to backup your /home stuff and any
other data you have and want to keep and install server edition. That,
too, is the way I'd go.

HTH,
-Ray

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Old 10-29-2009, 12:23 AM
Tom H
 
Default turning a desktop install into a server

On Wed, Oct 28, 2009 at 2:14 AM, David Curtis <dcurtis@uniserve.com> wrote:
> On Tue, 27 Oct 2009 16:54:54 -0700
> Joshua Solomin <jsolomin@gmail.com> wrote:
>> I recently installed the Ubuntu desktop edition, and got things
>> working; but what I really want to do is to make it a server-like box
>> that is exclusively logged into remotely (from other machines on my
>> home network). *I powered it down, unplugged monitor/keyboard/mouse,
>> put it in its new location, and turned it on -- but as far as I could
>> tell, the (wireless) networking didn't even start; I had to lug over
>> the periphals and plug them in, then log in to Ubuntu, then unplug
>> them again.
>> So now I have a box that I can remotely access (and on which I'm
>> actually still logged in locally). *But what if I have to reboot --
>> how can I set it up such that it doesn't need the peripherals at all,
>> and I can log into it remotely without having to log in locally first?
> You need to configure networking on boot in the /etc/network/interfaces
> file.
> http://nixcraft.com/ubuntu-debian/13278-etc-network-interfaces-wireless-wifi-example.html

If you would prefer to have all your networking in one file rather
than two like the nixcraft link above, you can put all your entries
into /e/n/i (this is for a static IP and WPA2):

auto eth1
iface eth1 inet static
address x.x.x.x
netmask x.x.x.x
network x.x.x.x
broadcast x.x.x.x
gateway x.x.x.x
wpa-ap-scan 1 # 2 for a hidden ssid
wpa-driver wext
wpa-group CCMP
wpa-key-mgmt WPA-PSK
wpa-pairewise CCMP
wpa-proto RSN
wpa-psk xxx
wpa-ssid xxx

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Old 10-29-2009, 12:35 AM
J Bickhard
 
Default turning a desktop install into a server

Try this: disconnect your keyboard and mouse, and only have your
display and network plugged in. See exactly what the computer is doing
when it is booting up e.g. if it is even getting into Ubuntu, if it's
not logging in automatically, etc.

Jake (dats me)

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