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"Alan E. Davis" 03-24-2009 07:13 AM

Common folder between two users (same machine)
 
My family members all want to access our photo archive, and perhaps music files from individual user's accounts.* How can I set this up?

Here's what I thought of so far, but I think it's not going to work nicely: two ideas are


** - set up a user "common" where a partition is mounted to /home/common/photos, or some such.
** - set up symlinks in each user's directory to folders that other users may be allowed to access
**


*Is there a standard way to do this?* I don't wnat to share folders with a windows computer.
Alan Davis

"An inviscid theory of flow renders the screw useless, but the need for one non-existent." * * * * * * * * * * ---Lord Raleigh (John William Strutt), or else his son, who was also a scientist.



It is undesirable to believe a proposition when
there is no ground whatsoever for supposing it is true.
* * ---- Bertrand Russell



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Gilles Gravier 03-24-2009 07:19 AM

Common folder between two users (same machine)
 
Title: Signature Home Chastity




Hi!



Alan E. Davis wrote:
My family members all want to access our photo archive,
and perhaps music files from individual user's accounts.* How can I set
this up?



Here's what I thought of so far, but I think it's not going to work
nicely: two ideas are

** - set up a user "common" where a partition is mounted to
/home/common/photos, or some such.

** - set up symlinks in each user's directory to folders that other
users may be allowed to access

**

*Is there a standard way to do this?* I don't wnat to share folders
with a windows computer.




Probably simplest is to have both users members of the same "group" (as
in /etc/group)



Then make the directory (and sub files) owned by that group (chgrp -R
YourGroup /YourSharedFolder)



Then you want to set that directory's (Set User ID) bit for the group,
recursively (chmod g+s /YouSharedFolder)



And you should be set...



Gilles.



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"Mihamina Rakotomandimby (R12y)" 03-24-2009 07:27 AM

Common folder between two users (same machine)
 
Alan E. Davis wrote:
> - set up a user "common" where a partition is mounted to
> /home/common/photos, or some such.
> - set up symlinks in each user's directory to folders that other
> users may be allowed to access

- Creating a /public directory and then chmoding it to 777
- Using filesystem ACLs:
- https://wiki.ubuntu.com/ACL-OnByDefault
- https://wiki.ubuntu.com/FilePermissions

PS: I dont understand _why_ Ubuntu documentation is behind an HTTPS link...
It forbids my squid to cache it...

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Fajar Priyanto 03-24-2009 07:29 AM

Common folder between two users (same machine)
 
> Probably simplest is to have both users members of the same "group" (as in
> /etc/group)
>
> Then make the directory (and sub files) owned by that group (chgrp -R
> YourGroup /YourSharedFolder)
>
> Then you want to set that directory's (Set User ID) bit for the group,
> recursively (chmod g+s /YouSharedFolder)
>
> And you should be set...

Little addition, if you want to prevent user from deleting other
user's files, we can use sticky bit:
chmod +t /YourSharedFolder
This way user can modify other user's files, but not delete them, only
the owner can.

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Chris G 03-24-2009 07:56 AM

Common folder between two users (same machine)
 
On Tue, Mar 24, 2009 at 04:29:11PM +0800, Fajar Priyanto wrote:
> > Probably simplest is to have both users members of the same "group" (as in
> > /etc/group)
> >
> > Then make the directory (and sub files) owned by that group (chgrp -R
> > YourGroup /YourSharedFolder)
> >
> > Then you want to set that directory's (Set User ID) bit for the group,
> > recursively (chmod g+s /YouSharedFolder)
> >
> > And you should be set...
>
> Little addition, if you want to prevent user from deleting other
> user's files, we can use sticky bit:
> chmod +t /YourSharedFolder
> This way user can modify other user's files, but not delete them, only
> the owner can.
>
But there's no *actual* difference between modifying a file and
deleting it surely. If I modify a file to zero length then I've
effectively deleted it.

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Gilles Gravier 03-24-2009 08:18 AM

Common folder between two users (same machine)
 
Title: Signature Home Chastity




Hi!



Chris G wrote:

On Tue, Mar 24, 2009 at 04:29:11PM +0800, Fajar Priyanto wrote:



Probably simplest is to have both users members of the same "group" (as in
/etc/group)

Then make the directory (and sub files) owned by that group (chgrp -R
YourGroup /YourSharedFolder)

Then you want to set that directory's (Set User ID) bit for the group,
recursively (chmod g+s /YouSharedFolder)

And you should be set...


Little addition, if you want to prevent user from deleting other
user's files, we can use sticky bit:
chmod +t /YourSharedFolder
This way user can modify other user's files, but not delete them, only
the owner can.



But there's no *actual* difference between modifying a file and
deleting it surely. If I modify a file to zero length then I've
effectively deleted it.



The idea is to prevent mistakes... not voluntary destructive action.
One can always walk up to the server with a big magnet and wave it
close to the disk and you delete everything...



Gilles.



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"Mihamina Rakotomandimby (R12y)" 03-24-2009 08:18 AM

Common folder between two users (same machine)
 
Chris G wrote:
> But there's no *actual* difference between modifying a file and
> deleting it surely.

"find" would still find it, so it's not deleted.

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"Alan E. Davis" 03-24-2009 10:01 AM

Common folder between two users (same machine)
 
There are many ideas here already.* I like the idea of a "/public" directory or "/common".* Maybe /usr/local/share/public, especially if /usr/local is a separate partition.** Maybe I'm missing something, though.*



I have gotten used to using nautilus, and even starting to like it.* Even though I'm still depressed about lack of facility in comparison with using the command line shell, I am able to access a reasonable number of subdirectories through the Bookmarks on the sidebar.* So, given that I can assign a bookmark to /public or /usr/local/common, or whatever, can I mount the directory to both user's ~/ (home) directory?*



I think my head is stuck back in a byegone age.* My students tell me that.
Alan Davis

"An inviscid theory of flow renders the screw useless, but the need for one non-existent." * * * * * * * * * * ---Lord Raleigh (John William Strutt), or else his son, who was also a scientist.



It is undesirable to believe a proposition when
there is no ground whatsoever for supposing it is true.
* * ---- Bertrand Russell

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"Mihamina Rakotomandimby (R12y)" 03-24-2009 11:10 AM

Common folder between two users (same machine)
 
Alan E. Davis wrote:
> [...] So,
> given that I can assign a bookmark to /public or /usr/local/common, or
> whatever, can I mount the directory to both user's ~/ (home) directory?

You wont mount a directory, but a partition instead.
Take a separate partition and mount it everwhere you want.

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System: xUbuntu 8.10 with almost all from package install
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"H.S." 03-24-2009 03:15 PM

Common folder between two users (same machine)
 
Alan E. Davis wrote:
> My family members all want to access our photo archive, and perhaps music
> files from individual user's accounts. How can I set this up?
>
> Here's what I thought of so far, but I think it's not going to work nicely:
> two ideas are
> - set up a user "common" where a partition is mounted to
> /home/common/photos, or some such.
> - set up symlinks in each user's directory to folders that other users
> may be allowed to access
>
> Is there a standard way to do this? I don't wnat to share folders with a
> windows computer.
>
> Alan Davis
>
> "An inviscid theory of flow renders the screw useless, but the need for one
> non-existent." ---Lord Raleigh (John William Strutt), or
> else his son, who was also a scientist.
>
> It is undesirable to believe a proposition when
> there is no ground whatsoever for supposing it is true.
> ---- Bertrand Russell
>
>

Case 1 that I have tried: I have a folder called /media/Photos which is
writable by the video group. This way all people in "video" group and
write/read to it. Everyone can put photos there (but all photos should
go in properly named directories and have some order to avoid chaos by
all family members!).

Case 2: But the previous did not allow the access over the network
(other than by opening a display). I then mounted that folder in samba
and made it belong to the smbuser group. Now everyone who has access to
that machine over samba from any machine (Mac, Windows, Linux) and
put/read photos from there.

Bottom line: IMHO, all photos should in one specific folder and arranged
there in some manner (multiple folders based on some criterion). And
that one folder must be readable/writable by a group, e.g. video. And
all people you want to share photos must belong to that group (mostly
all desktop users belong to the video group). The other option of
allowing permissions of 777 (everyone can write/read) is just not as
tight in security, but it is your choice.

Regards.


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