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Old 01-01-2008, 10:31 PM
"Andrew P. Burgess"
 
Default Installing Ubuntu

I've been trying to install Ubuntu on a
few different computers in a few different ways recently; I've never worked with
Linux before and want to give it a try. My latest attempt was to install it on a
partition, to dual boot with Vista. I tried to follow this article: http://apcmag.com/5046/how_to_dual_boot_vista_with_linux_vista_installed_ first;
but when I got to partitioning in the installation, there was no option to use
the empty space on the hard drive; also, that portion of my hard drive was
labeled "unusable." So I*chose manual partitioning and selected another
partition to install Ubuntu on. But when I tried to continue the installation
after choosing the partition, I received message telling me to choose something
for the root (I should have written it down ). I hope this all makes sense; if not, I'll
try again!
*
Should I format the partition I'm trying
to install Ubuntu on while in Windows before trying to install it? If so, is
ntfs what*I need to format it in? Or am I doing something wrong in the
Ubuntu side? I'd really appreciate any help! I'm*using a Dell Inspiron
1520*laptop.
*
Thanks,
Andrew*
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Old 01-02-2008, 03:29 PM
"Steve Flynn"
 
Default Installing Ubuntu

On Jan 1, 2008 11:31 PM, Andrew P. Burgess <apb@live.ca> wrote:
> was labeled "unusable." So I chose manual partitioning and selected another
> partition to install Ubuntu on. But when I tried to continue the
> installation after choosing the partition, I received message telling me to
> choose something for the root (I should have written it down ). I hope this
> all makes sense; if not, I'll try again!

I believe you've not told the installer that you want to use this
partiotin as the root partition (normally signified as /)

> Should I format the partition I'm trying to install Ubuntu on while in
> Windows before trying to install it? If so, is ntfs what I need to format it
> in? Or am I doing something wrong in the Ubuntu side? I'd really appreciate
> any help! I'm using a Dell Inspiron 1520 laptop.

Nope - you should allow the installer to format the partition you
selected. You have a choice of different formats which Linux can use -
ext3 seemed to be the flavour of 2007 and will perfectly well.

--
Steve
When one person suffers from a delusion it is insanity. When many
people suffer from a delusion it is called Religion.

09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0

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Old 01-02-2008, 04:46 PM
marvin mckinley
 
Default Installing Ubuntu

When doing a manual partition of Linux you have to have at least three designated partions :root ,swap and home.Root has to have at least 54 meg,swap should have at least twice what you have* in ram,for instance 512 meg of ram should have 1024 in the swap drive and home should have in my experience at least a gig ,more if you have* it available,these should be the minimum for a linux partiton.

"Andrew P. Burgess" <apb@live.ca> wrote: I've been trying to install Ubuntu on a few different computers in a few different ways recently; I've never worked with Linux before and want to give it a try. My latest attempt was to install it on a partition, to dual
boot with Vista. I tried to follow this article: http://apcmag.com/5046/how_to_dual_boot_vista_with_linux_vista_installed_ first; but when I got to partitioning in the installation, there was no option to use the empty space on the hard drive; also, that portion of my hard drive was labeled "unusable." So I*chose manual partitioning and selected another partition to install Ubuntu on. But when I tried to continue the installation after choosing the partition, I received message telling me to choose something for the root (I should have written it down ). I hope this all makes sense; if not, I'll try again! * Should I format the partition I'm trying to install Ubuntu on while in Windows before trying to install it? If so, is ntfs what*I need to format it in? Or am I doing something wrong in the Ubuntu side? I'd really appreciate any help! I'm*using a Dell Inspiron 1520*laptop. * Thanks, Andrew*--
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Old 01-02-2008, 04:52 PM
anthony baldwin
 
Default Installing Ubuntu

Andrew P. Burgess wrote:
> I've been trying to install Ubuntu on a few different computers in a
> few different ways recently; I've never worked with Linux before and
> want to give it a try. My latest attempt was to install it on a
> partition, to dual boot with Vista. I tried to follow this article:
> http://apcmag.com/5046/how_to_dual_boot_vista_with_linux_vista_installed_ first;
> but when I got to partitioning in the installation, there was no
> option to use the empty space on the hard drive; also, that portion of
> my hard drive was labeled "unusable." So I chose manual partitioning
> and selected another partition to install Ubuntu on. But when I tried
> to continue the installation after choosing the partition, I received
> message telling me to choose something for the root (I should have
> written it down Sad smile emoticon). I hope this all makes sense; if
> not, I'll try again!
>
> Should I format the partition I'm trying to install Ubuntu on while in
> Windows before trying to install it? If so, is ntfs what I need to
> format it in? Or am I doing something wrong in the Ubuntu side? I'd
> really appreciate any help! I'm using a Dell Inspiron 1520 laptop.
>
> Thanks,
> Andrew
The install program was asking you to name the root partition for the
install.

What I would do is boot up the Ubuntu live cd and use gparted to prepare
the disk.
Gparted is in the system/administration menu.
Gparted is pretty self-explanatory and easy to use.
You will have to be sure to unmount the hard drive before gparted can
play with it.
Your harddrive will show up on the desktop when you boot the cd, so,
just right click on it and
choose "unmount".
You will want to resize your windows partition (or, it sounds like
you've already done this),
and create a new partition on the remaining space.
You will format the new partition, likely ext3.
Then, when you choose install, the software will find the partitions and ask
you where you want to install. Choose the new partition (probably hda3).
Hda1 is, as likely as not, your vista install. Don't mess with that.

This is all off the top of my head here.
You may also want to create a swap partition while in gparted, but, in
all truth,
I think the installation program can do that for you during install.

If I have erred in any of this, surely someone will correct me.

good luck and welcome to Ubuntu!

/tony

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Old 01-02-2008, 05:37 PM
Derek Broughton
 
Default Installing Ubuntu

marvin mckinley wrote:

> When doing a manual partition of Linux you have to have at least three
> designated partions :root ,swap and home.

No you don't. You need a root and a swap (and even swap is not vital, it
will squawk at you if you try it, but still let you finish the install
without it).

> Root has to have at least 54 meg,

That looks way too small. It needs just about that in /boot, to be able to
hold the current boot image and one to replace it at the next upgrade.
Then you need room for, at least, /etc, /bin and /sbin, plus whatever space
is required for /usr, /var and /home if you don't put them on their own
partitions. My root partition is currently using 266MB, so I can't see it
being much less than half that for a minimum _if_ you have /usr and /var on
separate partitions. If you don't, /var can easily require many GB (var is
extremely flexible since it holds all the log files, caches, and mail
spool, so policy can make a huge difference to the size it will need),
and /usr should probably be at a bare minimum 3-5GB.
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Old 01-02-2008, 05:42 PM
Nils Kassube
 
Default Installing Ubuntu

marvin mckinley wrote:
> When doing a manual partition of Linux you have to have at least three
> designated partions :root ,swap and home.Root has to have at least 54
> meg,

I don't think you could make a working system with only 54MB for the /
partition. It is more like 4GB if you want to install only a bit more
than what comes with the Ubuntu CD.


Nils

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Old 01-02-2008, 05:55 PM
anthony baldwin
 
Default Installing Ubuntu

Nils Kassube wrote:
> marvin mckinley wrote:
>
>> When doing a manual partition of Linux you have to have at least three
>> designated partions :root ,swap and home.Root has to have at least 54
>> meg,
>>
>
> I don't think you could make a working system with only 54MB for the /
> partition. It is more like 4GB if you want to install only a bit more
> than what comes with the Ubuntu CD.
>
>
> Nils
>
>
I was gonna say...my swap is 10 times that size, even...

/tony

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Old 01-02-2008, 07:40 PM
"Andrew P. Burgess"
 
Default Installing Ubuntu

*

>>What I would do
is boot up the Ubuntu live cd and use gparted to prepare the disk.
*
Great! I
formatted the partition*in ext3 and it showed up as available in the
install.
*
>>I believe you've not told the installer that you want to use this
partition as the root partition (normally signified as /)
*
After formatting the partition, I was
able to tell it which partition I want to use.
*
>>That looks way too small.* It needs just about that in /boot,
to be able to
hold the current boot image and one to replace it at the next
upgrade.
Then you need room for, at least, /etc, /bin and /sbin, plus
whatever space
is required for /usr, /var and /home if you don't put them on
their own
partitions.* My root partition is currently using 266MB, so I
can't see it
being much less than half that for a minimum _if_ you have /usr
and /var on
separate partitions.* If you don't, /var can easily require
many GB (var is
extremely flexible since it holds all the log files, caches,
and mail
spool, so policy can make a huge difference to the size it will
need),
and /usr should probably be at a bare minimum 3-5GB.
*
I've got 10 GB to use; I'd like to put
the Linux equivalent of "My Documents" on a separate partition, formatted so
both Linux and Windows can read/write to it. I think that'd be FAT23, right? Or
is there a better option? Also, what folder do I mount to the "My Documents"
partition?
*
And what's the suggested*size for
the root partition? If I should make a swap partition, how big? (And I mount
/swap to the swap partition, right?)
*
Thanks to everyone who replied; I've
almost got it, and I'm learning a lot!
Andrew
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Old 01-02-2008, 07:58 PM
"Pr Lidn"
 
Default Installing Ubuntu

Hello, under linux, all users home directories (where all documents and settings are stored) are located under /home, so you should mount /home to a separate partition. That's what I've done. On my / partition (including /usr and /var), currently
4.5 gb is used, but I think I've installed quite a lot of programs. I have 1 gig ram, and 2 gigs swap, but honestly, that swap space is quite unneccesary, even if I have alot of programs loaded at the same time, my memory usage has neve been above 600 megs. So I've never actually have had any real use for my swap. Usually they recommend swap space twice as big as ram, but I would say that if you total swap + ram = ~
1.2 gigs, that's enough, say 512 megs ram, 700 megs swap, 1 gig ram, 256 megs swap. Like that. But other people might recommend other things.

I say you'd want at least 4 gig for the / partition (probably 5 or 6) to give room for temporary files, log files, and future programs you might wish to install. That leaves around around 4 gigs for /home. How much ram do you have?


/Pr

2008/1/2, Andrew P. Burgess <apb@live.ca>:






*


>>What I would do
is boot up the Ubuntu live cd and use gparted to prepare the disk.

*
Great! I
formatted the partition*in ext3 and it showed up as available in the
install.
*

>>I believe you've not told the installer that you want to use this
partition as the root partition (normally signified as /)
*
After formatting the partition, I was
able to tell it which partition I want to use.
*
>>That looks way too small.* It needs just about that in /boot,
to be able to
hold the current boot image and one to replace it at the next
upgrade.
Then you need room for, at least, /etc, /bin and /sbin, plus
whatever space
is required for /usr, /var and /home if you don't put them on
their own
partitions.* My root partition is currently using 266MB, so I
can't see it
being much less than half that for a minimum _if_ you have /usr
and /var on
separate partitions.* If you don't, /var can easily require
many GB (var is
extremely flexible since it holds all the log files, caches,
and mail
spool, so policy can make a huge difference to the size it will
need),
and /usr should probably be at a bare minimum 3-5GB.
*
I've got 10 GB to use; I'd like to put
the Linux equivalent of "My Documents" on a separate partition, formatted so
both Linux and Windows can read/write to it. I think that'd be FAT23, right? Or
is there a better option? Also, what folder do I mount to the "My Documents"
partition?
*
And what's the suggested*size for
the root partition? If I should make a swap partition, how big? (And I mount
/swap to the swap partition, right?)
*
Thanks to everyone who replied; I've
almost got it, and I'm learning a lot!
Andrew

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Old 01-02-2008, 08:28 PM
"Andrew P. Burgess"
 
Default Installing Ubuntu

How much ram do you have?
I've got 2GB of RAM, so I guess I can do
without the swap. Thanks, Andrew

*
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