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Old 02-27-2009, 10:35 PM
Stephen Constantinou
 
Default when to resize partitions

Dear All

I have a PC with a 160 GB HDD. It is partitioned as follows

SIZE USED
sda1 fat16 41MB 33MB
sda2 ntfs 78279MB 56634MB
sda4 fat32 3380MB 2366MB

sda5 ext3 4186MB 604MB
sda6 swop 4186MB 0MB
sda7 ext3 8381MB 3316MB
sda8 ext3 28697MB 1216MB
sda9 ext3 28648MB 6842MB
sda10 ext3 4194MB 100MB


It boots XP and Mandriva. My intention was to install Kubunto 8.10 to
replace Mandriva. I thought I knew what I was doing until I got the
Prepare Diskspace section of the installer.

After choosing to be guided over partition 8 I was offered a slide bar
that seemed to change partition 8 from the initial setting of

sda8, 13.4GB 50% AND kubuntu 8.10, 13.4GB, 50%

I could move the bar left to increase the kubuntu partition/section but
only reduce sda8 to 4.1GB 15% and kubuntu to 85%.

I chose this 15/85 ratio not fully understanding what I was doing but at
least believing I was not altering the windows installation.

As I progressed I got to a stage where it confirmed I was about to create
partition 11 of SCSi1 (0,0,0) (sda) as ext3 and
partition 12 of SCSi1 (0,0,0) (sda) as swop

Now I am confused.

Am I really creating more partitions and how do I simply use the
existing partitions for kubuntu. Perhaps this was not a problem but I
cannot see how creating more partitions is what I want to do and why can
I not use the whole of partition 8 for kubuntu?

I abandoned it and am posting this question to be cautious.

Any guidance and help appreciated.

Stephen

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Old 02-28-2009, 12:39 AM
Ashley Benton
 
Default when to resize partitions

On Fri, Feb 27, 2009 at 6:35 PM, Stephen Constantinou <stephanos@writeme.com> wrote:

Dear All



I have a PC with a 160 GB HDD. *It is partitioned as follows



* * * * * *SIZE * * *USED

sda1 fat16 * *41MB * *33MB

sda2 ntfs *78279MB 56634MB

sda4 fat32 *3380MB *2366MB



sda5 *ext3 *4186MB * 604MB

sda6 *swop *4186MB * * 0MB

sda7 *ext3 *8381MB *3316MB

sda8 *ext3 28697MB *1216MB

sda9 *ext3 28648MB *6842MB

sda10 ext3 *4194MB * 100MB





It boots XP and Mandriva. *My intention was to install Kubunto 8.10 to

replace Mandriva. *I thought I knew what I was doing until I got the

Prepare Diskspace section of the installer.



After choosing to be guided over partition 8 I was offered a slide bar

that seemed to change partition 8 from the initial setting of



sda8, 13.4GB 50% AND kubuntu 8.10, 13.4GB, 50%



I could move the bar left to increase the kubuntu partition/section but

only reduce sda8 to 4.1GB 15% and kubuntu to 85%.



I chose this 15/85 ratio not fully understanding what I was doing but at

least believing I was not altering the windows installation.



As I progressed I got to a stage where it confirmed I was about to create

partition 11 of SCSi1 (0,0,0) (sda) as ext3 and

partition 12 of SCSi1 (0,0,0) (sda) as swop



Now I am confused.



Am I really creating more partitions and how do I simply use the

existing partitions for kubuntu. *Perhaps this was not a problem but I

cannot see how creating more partitions is what I want to do and why can

I not use the whole of partition 8 for kubuntu?



I abandoned it and am posting this question to be cautious.



Any guidance and help appreciated.


I would use gparted to delete the partition (mandriva) and create an empty partition, then install kubuntu on the new created partition

Sincerely

Meg

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Old 02-28-2009, 01:42 AM
Lucio M Nicolosi
 
Default when to resize partitions

Ashley Benton wrote:
>
>
> On Fri, Feb 27, 2009 at 6:35 PM, Stephen Constantinou
> <stephanos@writeme.com <mailto:stephanos@writeme.com>> wrote:
>
> Dear All
>
> I have a PC with a 160 GB HDD. It is partitioned as follows
>
> SIZE USED
> sda1 fat16 41MB 33MB
> sda2 ntfs 78279MB 56634MB
> sda4 fat32 3380MB 2366MB
>
> sda5 ext3 4186MB 604MB
> sda6 swop 4186MB 0MB
> sda7 ext3 8381MB 3316MB
> sda8 ext3 28697MB 1216MB
> sda9 ext3 28648MB 6842MB
> sda10 ext3 4194MB 100MB
>
>
> It boots XP and Mandriva. My intention was to install Kubunto 8.10 to
> replace Mandriva. I thought I knew what I was doing until I got the
> Prepare Diskspace section of the installer.
>
> Any guidance and help appreciated.
>
>
> I would use gparted to delete the partition (mandriva) and create an
> empty partition, then install kubuntu on the new created partition
>
> Sincerely
>
> Meg

Or maybe you could delete all Mandriva partitions except the old /home
(sda10, I guess) to preserve any valuable data, resize or move it as
needed, and then create your new Kubuntu partitions (as always, at least
root , /home , /swap). (Of course, this is basically what Meg told you,
in other words).

I would also check if you still need DOS (sda1?) and Windows 98 or
shared area (sda4?).

Regards,

L.


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Old 02-28-2009, 02:12 AM
Derek Broughton
 
Default when to resize partitions

Ashley Benton wrote:

> On Fri, Feb 27, 2009 at 6:35 PM, Stephen Constantinou
> <stephanos@writeme.com
>> wrote:

>> After choosing to be guided over partition 8 I was offered a slide bar
>> that seemed to change partition 8 from the initial setting of
>>
>> sda8, 13.4GB 50% AND kubuntu 8.10, 13.4GB, 50%
>>
>> I could move the bar left to increase the kubuntu partition/section but
>> only reduce sda8 to 4.1GB 15% and kubuntu to 85%.

I'm not _certain_ what that's doing - I only saw it for the first time this
week - but I think it's trying to preserve the original data by shrinking
the partition, so...

>> As I progressed I got to a stage where it confirmed I was about to create
>> partition 11 of SCSi1 (0,0,0) (sda) as ext3 and
>> partition 12 of SCSi1 (0,0,0) (sda) as swop
...
>> Am I really creating more partitions

Absolutely - it is keeping all your old partitions and creating the minimum
two that it needs for Ubuntu.

>> and how do I simply use the
>> existing partitions for kubuntu.

Manual partitioning - at least to delete the old Mandriva partition, then
you can back up and tell it to use the free space.

>> Perhaps this was not a problem but I
>> cannot see how creating more partitions is what I want to do and why can
>> I not use the whole of partition 8 for kubuntu?

You certainly can, but as long as you tell it to use the "guided" method,
it's going to try not to damage anything else you have.

> I would use gparted to delete the partition (mandriva) and create an empty
> partition, then install kubuntu on the new created partition

That's pretty much overkill when he's already _in_ a partitioning tool
(based on parted, iirc).
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Old 02-28-2009, 12:53 PM
Ray Parrish
 
Default when to resize partitions

Ashley Benton wrote:
>
>
> On Fri, Feb 27, 2009 at 6:35 PM, Stephen Constantinou
> <stephanos@writeme.com <mailto:stephanos@writeme.com>> wrote:
>
> Dear All
>
> I have a PC with a 160 GB HDD. It is partitioned as follows
>
> SIZE USED
> sda1 fat16 41MB 33MB
> sda2 ntfs 78279MB 56634MB
> sda4 fat32 3380MB 2366MB
>
> sda5 ext3 4186MB 604MB
> sda6 swop 4186MB 0MB
> sda7 ext3 8381MB 3316MB
> sda8 ext3 28697MB 1216MB
> sda9 ext3 28648MB 6842MB
> sda10 ext3 4194MB 100MB
>
>
> It boots XP and Mandriva. My intention was to install Kubunto 8.10 to
> replace Mandriva. I thought I knew what I was doing until I got the
> Prepare Diskspace section of the installer.
>
> After choosing to be guided over partition 8 I was offered a slide bar
> that seemed to change partition 8 from the initial setting of
>
> sda8, 13.4GB 50% AND kubuntu 8.10, 13.4GB, 50%
>
> I could move the bar left to increase the kubuntu
> partition/section but
> only reduce sda8 to 4.1GB 15% and kubuntu to 85%.
>
> I chose this 15/85 ratio not fully understanding what I was doing
> but at
> least believing I was not altering the windows installation.
>
> As I progressed I got to a stage where it confirmed I was about to
> create
> partition 11 of SCSi1 (0,0,0) (sda) as ext3 and
> partition 12 of SCSi1 (0,0,0) (sda) as swop
>
> Now I am confused.
>
> Am I really creating more partitions and how do I simply use the
> existing partitions for kubuntu. Perhaps this was not a problem but I
> cannot see how creating more partitions is what I want to do and
> why can
> I not use the whole of partition 8 for kubuntu?
>
> I abandoned it and am posting this question to be cautious.
>
> Any guidance and help appreciated.
>
Hello,

It's possible to skip the partitioning step altogether. You already have
a 4 GB swap partition that you can use, and need only empty the current
Mandriva partition, and install to it. I see it currently has a little
over a GB used in that partition. If it's just the Mandriva operating
system, and no data that you care to keep, simply select that partition
to install to, and then select the "manual" option when the partition
manager comes up.

This will allow you to skip the partitioning step, and go right on to
installing Kubuntu into sda8, which will overwrite anything currently
there. If you want to make that partition a bit bigger, you could do
that as well, with the manual method. I used this method the last time I
installed Ubuntu, but I forgot to set up a swap partition, so I had to
create a swap file once in Ubuntu, and mount it at /mnt/ which works
just as well as using a dedicated partition.

Since you already have a huge 4 GB swap partition set up, you don't need
another one. I read an article the other day that told how to share a
swap partition between Linux and Windows, so if you;re interested in
that, I'll dig through my browser history, and post the url here.

If for some reason the manual partitioning option will still not allow
you to increase the size of sda8, then I would take the advice of the
other person who answered previously, and use a Gparted Live CD to do it
before the install. If you do that don't make the mistake I made while
using Gparted Live. While I was using it to resize my Windows and Ubuntu
partitions to take back some of the space Ubuntu grabbed during the
guided install [I didn't notice the slider adjustment, so it got more
than I wanted to give it] I got bored, and began fiddling with things in
the Gparted interface while it was resizing things.

I found a setting to hide some component of the Gparted Live desktop,
and made the mistake of attempting to set it to hidden. Since it's a CD,
and read only, it's attempt to comply and record the setting didn't go
well. The hard drive light quit flashing, indicating that the
repartitioning had stopped, the computer became unresponsive, and I
eventually had to give up and hard power down.

I got lucky, as the only thing I had to do to fix the damage from the
interrupted partitioning process, was re-installing Ubuntu. If it had
gotten much farther along in the process, I'm sure I would have lost
Windows as well. So... it's best to leave Gparted Live alone while it
runs. 8-)

Later, Ray Parrish

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http://www.rayslinks.com
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http://www.writingsoftheschizophrenic.com/


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Old 02-28-2009, 07:07 PM
Stephen Constantinou
 
Default when to resize partitions

Derek Broughton wrote:
> Ashley Benton wrote:
>
>> On Fri, Feb 27, 2009 at 6:35 PM, Stephen Constantinou
>> <stephanos@writeme.com
>>> wrote:
>
>>> After choosing to be guided over partition 8 I was offered a slide bar
>>> that seemed to change partition 8 from the initial setting of
>>>
>>> sda8, 13.4GB 50% AND kubuntu 8.10, 13.4GB, 50%
>>>
>>> I could move the bar left to increase the kubuntu partition/section but
>>> only reduce sda8 to 4.1GB 15% and kubuntu to 85%.
>
> I'm not _certain_ what that's doing - I only saw it for the first time this
> week - but I think it's trying to preserve the original data by shrinking
> the partition, so...
>
>>> As I progressed I got to a stage where it confirmed I was about to create
>>> partition 11 of SCSi1 (0,0,0) (sda) as ext3 and
>>> partition 12 of SCSi1 (0,0,0) (sda) as swop
> ...
>>> Am I really creating more partitions
>
> Absolutely - it is keeping all your old partitions and creating the minimum
> two that it needs for Ubuntu.
>
>>> and how do I simply use the
>>> existing partitions for kubuntu.
>
> Manual partitioning - at least to delete the old Mandriva partition, then
> you can back up and tell it to use the free space.
>
>>> Perhaps this was not a problem but I
>>> cannot see how creating more partitions is what I want to do and why can
>>> I not use the whole of partition 8 for kubuntu?
>
> You certainly can, but as long as you tell it to use the "guided" method,
> it's going to try not to damage anything else you have.
>
>> I would use gparted to delete the partition (mandriva) and create an empty
>> partition, then install kubuntu on the new created partition
>
> That's pretty much overkill when he's already _in_ a partitioning tool
> (based on parted, iirc).

Dear All

Thanks for this info and I think I have a way forward.

Just a little more background info. The fat 16/32 partitions are for
the Dell recovery and diagnostic programmes that I want to preserve. I
do not need to retain any data from the home partition in Mandriva.


Q1) How can I tell which partition was the home partition?

Q2) Can I assume that if I chose the manual option I will be able to
combine all the non windows partitions and then at a different stage
allocate it to kubuntu and it will sort out the swop, bootable partition
etc. I am hoping I will not be asked which partitions are for which
purpose as I will not know.

Thanks and wait to hear

Stephen (the cautious)

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Old 02-28-2009, 07:58 PM
Lucio M Nicolosi
 
Default when to resize partitions

> Just a little more background info. *The fat 16/32 partitions are for
> the Dell recovery and diagnostic programmes that I want to preserve. *I
> do not need to retain any data from the home partition in Mandriva.
>
>
> Q1) How can I tell which partition was the home partition?


If you do not want "any data from the home partition in Mandriva"
what's the use?

(Booting Ubuntu from the Live CD you can mount the old partitions and
check their contents.)


> Q2) Can I assume that if I chose the manual option I will be able to
> combine all the non windows partitions and then at a different stage
> allocate it to kubuntu and it will sort out the swop, bootable partition
> etc. *I am hoping I will not be asked which partitions are for which
> purpose as I will not know.

You are going to remove all Linux unwanted partitions (probably
contiguous) and Ubuntu will (manually or guided) create the needed
ones in the free space.

You will need at least:
one root partition (say 10Gb) /
one swap partition (say 2 to 4 Gb) /swap
one home partition /home (at least 10 Gb, but can occupy the rest of
the available space)

L.

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Old 02-28-2009, 10:23 PM
Derek Broughton
 
Default when to resize partitions

Stephen Constantinou wrote:

> Q1) How can I tell which partition was the home partition?

Best to boot into the Mandriva system and check what partitions are mounted.

> Q2) Can I assume that if I chose the manual option I will be able to
> combine all the non windows partitions and then at a different stage
> allocate it to kubuntu and it will sort out the swop, bootable partition
> etc. I am hoping I will not be asked which partitions are for which
> purpose as I will not know.

If you use the manual partitioning tool to _delete_ all the unneeded
partitions, you then back up in the installer and restart the "guided"
install - it will use all the available free space and partition it
appropriately
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Old 03-06-2009, 07:50 AM
Stephen Constantinou
 
Default when to resize partitions

Derek Broughton wrote:
> Stephen Constantinou wrote:
>
>> Q1) How can I tell which partition was the home partition?
>
> Best to boot into the Mandriva system and check what partitions are mounted.
>
>> Q2) Can I assume that if I chose the manual option I will be able to
>> combine all the non windows partitions and then at a different stage
>> allocate it to kubuntu and it will sort out the swop, bootable partition
>> etc. I am hoping I will not be asked which partitions are for which
>> purpose as I will not know.
>
> If you use the manual partitioning tool to _delete_ all the unneeded
> partitions, you then back up in the installer and restart the "guided"
> install - it will use all the available free space and partition it
> appropriately
Dear All and Derek

Alas, alack

I did this but ended up with Mandriva, XP, and Kubuntu on my computer.
It was as though after deleting the partitions and going back one stage
the deleted partitions were ignored. I was presented with three options
that used the word guided:
A) Guided - resize SCSII (0,0,0) partition #9 (sda) and use free space
(I did not chose this one as I could not understand why I could move the
slider partition to the far left but not allocate all to Kubuntu)
B) Guided - use entire disk
C) Guided - use the largest continuous free space (I chose this one as
it appeared to be the suggestion "-it will use all the available free
space and partition it")
As a result I have moved from this
SIZE USED
sda1 fat16 41MB 33MB
sda2 ntfs 78279MB 56634MB
sda4 fat32 3380MB 2366MB

sda5 ext3 4186MB 604MB
sda6 swop 4186MB 0MB
sda7 ext3 8381MB 3316MB
sda8 ext3 28697MB 1216MB
sda9 ext3 28648MB 6842MB
sda10 ext3 4194MB 100MB

to this:
SIZE USED
sda1 fat16 41MB 33MB
sda2 ntfs 78279MB 56634MB
sda4 fat32 3380MB 2366MB
sda5 ext3 4186MB 604MB
sda6 swap 4186MB 0MB
sda7 ext3 8381MB 3316MB
sda8 ext3 4375MB 828MB
sda11 ext3 23269MB 2578MB
sda12 swap 1052MB 0MB
sda9 ext3 28648MB 6842MB
sda10 ext3 4194MB 100MB

Before I deleted these partition's I looked at the other options of
editing the partition and I was confronted with options I did not
understand: Ext3 Journalling file system, Ext2 Journalling file system
and many others.

At one stage, I cannot remember what I had done, I was asked to select
/. That really confused me.

sda1 and sda4 are probably the recovery partition and the diagnostic
tools that were installed by default by Dell.

I am at the edge of my knowledge if not beyond it and now I am in a
worse position than before. Currently the default OS to boot is
Kubuntu. When my wife discovers this she will be really annoyed.

So here are the questions
1) What does the slider bar in option A mean? Should I have chosen this?
2) How do I achieve my objective of Windows XP and Kubuntu (plus Dell
recovery and diagnostics)?
3) If I do achieve this will I have to make XP the default or will it be
done for me?

Any further help appreciated

Yours in desperation

Stephen Constantinou

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Old 03-07-2009, 11:21 AM
Stephen Constantinou
 
Default when to resize partitions

Stephen Constantinou wrote:
> Derek Broughton wrote:
>> Stephen Constantinou wrote:
>>
>>> Q1) How can I tell which partition was the home partition?
>> Best to boot into the Mandriva system and check what partitions are mounted.
>>
>>> Q2) Can I assume that if I chose the manual option I will be able to
>>> combine all the non windows partitions and then at a different stage
>>> allocate it to kubuntu and it will sort out the swop, bootable partition
>>> etc. I am hoping I will not be asked which partitions are for which
>>> purpose as I will not know.
>> If you use the manual partitioning tool to _delete_ all the unneeded
>> partitions, you then back up in the installer and restart the "guided"
>> install - it will use all the available free space and partition it
>> appropriately
> Dear All and Derek
>
> Alas, alack
>
> I did this but ended up with Mandriva, XP, and Kubuntu on my computer.
> It was as though after deleting the partitions and going back one stage
> the deleted partitions were ignored. I was presented with three options
> that used the word guided:
> A) Guided - resize SCSII (0,0,0) partition #9 (sda) and use free space
> (I did not chose this one as I could not understand why I could move the
> slider partition to the far left but not allocate all to Kubuntu)
> B) Guided - use entire disk
> C) Guided - use the largest continuous free space (I chose this one as
> it appeared to be the suggestion "-it will use all the available free
> space and partition it")
> As a result I have moved from this
> SIZE USED
> sda1 fat16 41MB 33MB
> sda2 ntfs 78279MB 56634MB
> sda4 fat32 3380MB 2366MB
>
> sda5 ext3 4186MB 604MB
> sda6 swop 4186MB 0MB
> sda7 ext3 8381MB 3316MB
> sda8 ext3 28697MB 1216MB
> sda9 ext3 28648MB 6842MB
> sda10 ext3 4194MB 100MB
>
> to this:
> SIZE USED
> sda1 fat16 41MB 33MB
> sda2 ntfs 78279MB 56634MB
> sda4 fat32 3380MB 2366MB
> sda5 ext3 4186MB 604MB
> sda6 swap 4186MB 0MB
> sda7 ext3 8381MB 3316MB
> sda8 ext3 4375MB 828MB
> sda11 ext3 23269MB 2578MB
> sda12 swap 1052MB 0MB
> sda9 ext3 28648MB 6842MB
> sda10 ext3 4194MB 100MB
>
> Before I deleted these partition's I looked at the other options of
> editing the partition and I was confronted with options I did not
> understand: Ext3 Journalling file system, Ext2 Journalling file system
> and many others.
>
> At one stage, I cannot remember what I had done, I was asked to select
> /. That really confused me.
>
> sda1 and sda4 are probably the recovery partition and the diagnostic
> tools that were installed by default by Dell.
>
> I am at the edge of my knowledge if not beyond it and now I am in a
> worse position than before. Currently the default OS to boot is
> Kubuntu. When my wife discovers this she will be really annoyed.
>
> So here are the questions
> 1) What does the slider bar in option A mean? Should I have chosen this?
> 2) How do I achieve my objective of Windows XP and Kubuntu (plus Dell
> recovery and diagnostics)?
> 3) If I do achieve this will I have to make XP the default or will it be
> done for me?
>
> Any further help appreciated
>
> Yours in desperation
>
> Stephen Constantinou
>

Dear All and Meg

Desperation led me to look again at all the previous replies. Meg's
suggestion worked a treat. I downloaded an ISO of gparted made a
bootable CD. Booted to it, deleted the now many unwanted partitions.
Rebooted to the Kubuntu CD and chose the option to be guided - use the
largest free space available.

I have learnt a little, solved the problem and have exactly what I wanted.

Thank you all, thank you Meg

Stephen

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