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Old 02-21-2009, 08:34 PM
Asif Iqbal
 
Default Migrate Ubuntu to a bigger disk on a laptop

Hi All

I have ubuntu 8.10 running on my laptop. It is a 40gb disk. I want to
upgrade it to 250gb drive.

I am thinking of doing the migration like this

1. copy over my home dir to another machine on same subnet using tar/ssh
2. generate a list of all the pkgs and save it on a file on another machine
3. boot from a liveCD and wipe the disk clean
4. replace the 40g disk with new 250g disk
5. fresh install ubuntu 8.10
6. copy my home dir content back from remote machine
7. take the pkg list file from remote machine and pipe it through
aptitude to install all the new pkgs

Am I missing anything?

Now what is the best way to do step 2 and step 7?

Also what is the best method of wipe clean a hard drive in step 3?

How do I make sure the rc scripts are setup same way? There are few
apps where I ran
the `sudo update-rc.d -f <appname> remove'. So the rc scripts are not
at default state

Thanks for your help

--
Asif Iqbal
PGP Key: 0xE62693C5 KeyServer: pgp.mit.edu
A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
Q: Why is top-posting such a bad thing?

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Old 02-21-2009, 08:45 PM
Josh Holland
 
Default Migrate Ubuntu to a bigger disk on a laptop

> 2. generate a list of all the pkgs and save it on a file on another machine
sudo aptitude-create-state-bundle bundle.tar.gz

> 3. boot from a liveCD and wipe the disk clean
fdisk

> 7. take the pkg list file from remote machine and pipe it through
> aptitude to install all the new pkgs
sudo aptitude-run-state-bundle bundle.tar.gz

> How do I make sure the rc scripts are setup same way? There are few
> apps where I ran
> the `sudo update-rc.d -f <appname> remove'. So the rc scripts are not
> at default state
>
Probably easiest just to copy over the rc scripts

(NB I am not absolutely 100% sure about the aptitude commands. My
interpretation of the manpages is that they do what you want, but read
them yourself.)
--
Josh Holland <jrh@joshh.co.uk>


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Old 02-21-2009, 10:22 PM
Brian McKee
 
Default Migrate Ubuntu to a bigger disk on a laptop

On Sat, Feb 21, 2009 at 4:34 PM, Asif Iqbal <vadud3@gmail.com> wrote:
> Hi All
>
> I have ubuntu 8.10 running on my laptop. It is a 40gb disk. I want to
> upgrade it to 250gb drive.

Your steps will work - let me make an alternative suggestion though...

Backup your home folder to another machine on the network as you wanted to.

Install mondo 2.2.8 from the mondo website.

Backup your laptop to cd's or a network share

Install the bigger harddrive and restore using your mondoarchive cd(s)

Much simpler. :-)

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Old 02-21-2009, 11:29 PM
Asif Iqbal
 
Default Migrate Ubuntu to a bigger disk on a laptop

On Sat, Feb 21, 2009 at 6:22 PM, Brian McKee <brian.mckee@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Sat, Feb 21, 2009 at 4:34 PM, Asif Iqbal <vadud3@gmail.com> wrote:
>> Hi All
>>
>> I have ubuntu 8.10 running on my laptop. It is a 40gb disk. I want to
>> upgrade it to 250gb drive.
>
> Your steps will work - let me make an alternative suggestion though...
>
> Backup your home folder to another machine on the network as you wanted to.
>
> Install mondo 2.2.8 from the mondo website.
>
> Backup your laptop to cd's or a network share

I will give that a try from work. I have lot bigger than 40G, my
laptop disk size, nfs folder there.

>
> Install the bigger harddrive and restore using your mondoarchive cd(s)
>
> Much simpler. :-)
>
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>



--
Asif Iqbal
PGP Key: 0xE62693C5 KeyServer: pgp.mit.edu
A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
Q: Why is top-posting such a bad thing?

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Old 02-21-2009, 11:30 PM
Asif Iqbal
 
Default Migrate Ubuntu to a bigger disk on a laptop

On Sat, Feb 21, 2009 at 4:45 PM, Josh Holland <jrh@joshh.co.uk> wrote:
>> 2. generate a list of all the pkgs and save it on a file on another machine
> sudo aptitude-create-state-bundle bundle.tar.gz
>
>> 3. boot from a liveCD and wipe the disk clean
> fdisk
>
>> 7. take the pkg list file from remote machine and pipe it through
>> aptitude to install all the new pkgs
> sudo aptitude-run-state-bundle bundle.tar.gz
>
>> How do I make sure the rc scripts are setup same way? There are few
>> apps where I ran
>> the `sudo update-rc.d -f <appname> remove'. So the rc scripts are not
>> at default state
>>
> Probably easiest just to copy over the rc scripts

So just backup the /etc/rc?.d dirs ?

>
> (NB I am not absolutely 100% sure about the aptitude commands. My
> interpretation of the manpages is that they do what you want, but read
> them yourself.)
> --
> Josh Holland <jrh@joshh.co.uk>
>
>
> --
> ubuntu-users mailing list
> ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
> Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
>



--
Asif Iqbal
PGP Key: 0xE62693C5 KeyServer: pgp.mit.edu
A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
Q: Why is top-posting such a bad thing?

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Old 02-22-2009, 03:04 AM
Rick Bragg
 
Default Migrate Ubuntu to a bigger disk on a laptop

On Sat, 2009-02-21 at 16:34 -0500, Asif Iqbal wrote:
> Hi All
>
> I have ubuntu 8.10 running on my laptop. It is a 40gb disk. I want to
> upgrade it to 250gb drive.
>
> I am thinking of doing the migration like this
>
> 1. copy over my home dir to another machine on same subnet using tar/ssh
> 2. generate a list of all the pkgs and save it on a file on another machine
> 3. boot from a liveCD and wipe the disk clean
> 4. replace the 40g disk with new 250g disk
> 5. fresh install ubuntu 8.10
> 6. copy my home dir content back from remote machine
> 7. take the pkg list file from remote machine and pipe it through
> aptitude to install all the new pkgs
>
> Am I missing anything?
>
> Now what is the best way to do step 2 and step 7?
>
> Also what is the best method of wipe clean a hard drive in step 3?
>
> How do I make sure the rc scripts are setup same way? There are few
> apps where I ran
> the `sudo update-rc.d -f <appname> remove'. So the rc scripts are not
> at default state
>
> Thanks for your help
>
> --
> Asif Iqbal
> PGP Key: 0xE62693C5 KeyServer: pgp.mit.edu
> A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
> Q: Why is top-posting such a bad thing?



I have done the following before and it worked great. It seems like
allot, but for me this was the easiest way, and I knew everything that
happend.

* On your current laptop, as root, run something like the following to
back up your laptop to a remote machine:

tar -zcvpf - / --exclude-from /path/tar.exclude | ssh user@backuphost "( cat > /path/to/backup.tar.gz )"

*** In your tar.exclude file (above), put something like this:
/dev/*
/proc/*
/mnt/*/*
/sys/*
/var/tmp/ccache/*

After you run that, your entire system should be backed up. (keep your
old hard drive aside in case something goes wrong)

Then:
* replace the drive with the new one,
* boot up the laptop from a live CD,
* partition your new drive with cfdisk, make it bootable, and mount it
somewhere, don't forget to make a swap partition as well.
* copy the tar file back onto the new mounted drive with scp. Something
like:
scp user@backuphost//path/to/backup.tar.gz /mnt/newdrive/.
* untar it with:
cd /mnt/newdrive
tar zxvpf backup.tar.gz

reboot.

Assuming that you have just a root partition, and a swap partition,
things should go well, if you have a separate boot partition, make sure
to mount that in the right place before you untar the backup. If
everything works, you can remove the backup.tar.gz from your root
directory.

Thoughts?
Thanks!
rick








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Old 02-22-2009, 08:41 AM
Josh Holland
 
Default Migrate Ubuntu to a bigger disk on a laptop

> So just backup the /etc/rc?.d dirs ?

That's what I meant, yes. It may be easier looking into some of the
other suggestions though; some of them seem a little less labour
intensive. Also, I like to look at a reinstall as a chance to clean up
all the cruft that has accumulated. So perhaps just blindly copying over
the packages you had on before, it might be better to look at the ones
you use regularly, and just install those.
--
Josh Holland <jrh@joshh.co.uk>


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Old 02-22-2009, 01:05 PM
Asif Iqbal
 
Default Migrate Ubuntu to a bigger disk on a laptop

On Sat, Feb 21, 2009 at 11:04 PM, Rick Bragg <rbragg@gmnet.net> wrote:
> On Sat, 2009-02-21 at 16:34 -0500, Asif Iqbal wrote:
>> Hi All
>>
>> I have ubuntu 8.10 running on my laptop. It is a 40gb disk. I want to
>> upgrade it to 250gb drive.
>>
>> I am thinking of doing the migration like this
>>
>> 1. copy over my home dir to another machine on same subnet using tar/ssh
>> 2. generate a list of all the pkgs and save it on a file on another machine
>> 3. boot from a liveCD and wipe the disk clean
>> 4. replace the 40g disk with new 250g disk
>> 5. fresh install ubuntu 8.10
>> 6. copy my home dir content back from remote machine
>> 7. take the pkg list file from remote machine and pipe it through
>> aptitude to install all the new pkgs
>>
>> Am I missing anything?
>>
>> Now what is the best way to do step 2 and step 7?
>>
>> Also what is the best method of wipe clean a hard drive in step 3?
>>
>> How do I make sure the rc scripts are setup same way? There are few
>> apps where I ran
>> the `sudo update-rc.d -f <appname> remove'. So the rc scripts are not
>> at default state
>>
>> Thanks for your help
>>
>> --
>> Asif Iqbal
>> PGP Key: 0xE62693C5 KeyServer: pgp.mit.edu
>> A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
>> Q: Why is top-posting such a bad thing?
>
>
>
> I have done the following before and it worked great. It seems like
> allot, but for me this was the easiest way, and I knew everything that
> happend.
>
> * On your current laptop, as root, run something like the following to
> back up your laptop to a remote machine:
>
> tar -zcvpf - / --exclude-from /path/tar.exclude | ssh user@backuphost "( cat > /path/to/backup.tar.gz )"

It needs more space than I have available. But I will give this a try
for some other test machine

>
> *** In your tar.exclude file (above), put something like this:
> /dev/*
> /proc/*
> /mnt/*/*
> /sys/*
> /var/tmp/ccache/*
>
> After you run that, your entire system should be backed up. (keep your
> old hard drive aside in case something goes wrong)
>
> Then:
> * replace the drive with the new one,
> * boot up the laptop from a live CD,
> * partition your new drive with cfdisk, make it bootable, and mount it
> somewhere, don't forget to make a swap partition as well.
> * copy the tar file back onto the new mounted drive with scp. Something
> like:
> scp user@backuphost//path/to/backup.tar.gz /mnt/newdrive/.
> * untar it with:
> cd /mnt/newdrive
> tar zxvpf backup.tar.gz
>
> reboot.
>
> Assuming that you have just a root partition, and a swap partition,
> things should go well, if you have a separate boot partition, make sure
> to mount that in the right place before you untar the backup. If
> everything works, you can remove the backup.tar.gz from your root
> directory.
>
> Thoughts?
> Thanks!
> rick
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> This message has been scanned for viruses and
> dangerous content by Green Mountain Network, and is
> believed to be clean.
>
>
> --
> ubuntu-users mailing list
> ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
> Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
>



--
Asif Iqbal
PGP Key: 0xE62693C5 KeyServer: pgp.mit.edu
A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
Q: Why is top-posting such a bad thing?

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Old 02-22-2009, 01:08 PM
Asif Iqbal
 
Default Migrate Ubuntu to a bigger disk on a laptop

On Sun, Feb 22, 2009 at 4:41 AM, Josh Holland <jrh@joshh.co.uk> wrote:
>> So just backup the /etc/rc?.d dirs ?
>
> That's what I meant, yes. It may be easier looking into some of the
> other suggestions though; some of them seem a little less labour
> intensive. Also, I like to look at a reinstall as a chance to clean up
> all the cruft that has accumulated. So perhaps just blindly copying over
> the packages you had on before, it might be better to look at the ones
> you use regularly, and just install those.

exactly! that is why I prefer pkg list instead. i have a pretty fast network
but not much space.

> --
> Josh Holland <jrh@joshh.co.uk>
>
>
> --
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> ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
> Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
>



--
Asif Iqbal
PGP Key: 0xE62693C5 KeyServer: pgp.mit.edu
A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
Q: Why is top-posting such a bad thing?

--
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Old 02-26-2009, 01:18 PM
Dotan Cohen
 
Default Migrate Ubuntu to a bigger disk on a laptop

> exactly! that is why I prefer pkg list instead. i have a pretty fast network
> but not much space.
>

How did you make your package list?

--
Dotan Cohen

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