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Old 02-20-2009, 12:30 AM
NoOp
 
Default All new docs in the last five days are gone!

On 02/19/2009 05:01 PM, Rashkae wrote:
> NoOp wrote:

>>
>> Perhaps 'sudo e2fsck -cc /dev/<device>' would be easier/better?
>>
>> man e2fsck:
>> -c This option causes e2fsck to use badblocks(8) program to do a
>> read-only scan of the device in order to find any bad blocks.
>> If any bad blocks are found, they are added to the bad block
>> inode to prevent them from being allocated to a file or direc‐
>> tory. If this option is specified twice, then the bad block
>> scan will be done using a non-destructive read-write test.
>>
>
> Nae. If a modern hard drive starts getting bad blocks that are visible
> to the OS (ie, it can't remap the clusters itself transparently), the
> bin is the correct remedy, not trying to map the filesystem around it.
>
>

Won't dispute that :-) But I've got a bad 30GB laptop drive that is
ready for the bin & thought that I'd run a bunch of these 'tests' on it
first to become more familiar with their good/bad/ugly sides. Doesn't
matter if the drive grinds itself into dust at this point, so I might as
well use it as a guinea pig... I'm running 'sudo e2fsck -cc
/dev/<device>' from Knoppix now to see what the results will be.






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Old 02-20-2009, 12:31 AM
Brian McKee
 
Default All new docs in the last five days are gone!

>>
>> Perhaps 'sudo e2fsck -cc /dev/<device>' would be easier/better?
>>
>> man e2fsck:
>> -c This option causes e2fsck to use badblocks(8) program to do a
>> read-only scan of the device in order to find any bad blocks.
>> If any bad blocks are found, they are added to the bad block
>> inode to prevent them from being allocated to a file or direcâ€
>> tory. If this option is specified twice, then the bad block
>> scan will be done using a non-destructive read-write test.
>>
>
> Nae. If a modern hard drive starts getting bad blocks that are visible
> to the OS (ie, it can't remap the clusters itself transparently), the
> bin is the correct remedy, not trying to map the filesystem around it.

Further to this - if I don't run Spin Rite on a drive I just dd
if=/dev/zero of=/dev/theDrive until it errors out of space at least
once. That way it writes to every block it can and the drive can find
and remap all the bad blocks.

Brian

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Old 02-20-2009, 12:38 AM
Rashkae
 
Default All new docs in the last five days are gone!

Brian McKee wrote:

> Further to this - if I don't run Spin Rite on a drive I just dd
> if=/dev/zero of=/dev/theDrive until it errors out of space at least
> once. That way it writes to every block it can and the drive can find
> and remap all the bad blocks.
>
> Brian
>

badblocks -w or -n will do the same thing, with the added bonus that not
only does every block get written to, but every block gets read to make
sure the drive got it right, and any discrepancies are reported.


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