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Old 02-01-2009, 12:31 AM
' =JeffH '
 
Default migration to 64bit ?

I've been reading through the various 64bit threads with interest. I'm on a
core2duo machine, presently running 32bit.

My overall question is what are the (detailed) steps would one take to migrate
a system from, say, 32bit Ubuntu 8.04 LTS ("Hardy Heron") to 64bit Hardy?

My video card is nVidia, and it appears they have a 64bit linux driver. As
threads here have indicated, there is now 64bit support for Flash, Java, etc.
So those main items are apparently addressed.

One item that hasn't really been discussed is virtual machines: I presently
use vmware v6 to run at least one guest OS (winXP), and sometimes linux VMs.
In looking at VMware's site, it seems that they've had 64bit support for a
while now, and one can run 32bit guest OS's on 64bit host OS's, so that
appears to be just a matter of downloading the x86_64 installer, yes?

So, if one has a functional 32bit Hardy system, what are the machinations to
make it become 64bit?

thanks,

=JeffH



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Old 02-01-2009, 02:17 AM
Leonard Chatagnier
 
Default migration to 64bit ?

--- On Sat, 1/31/09, ' =JeffH ' <Jeff.Hodges@KingsMountain.com> wrote:

> From: ' =JeffH ' <Jeff.Hodges@KingsMountain.com>
> Subject: migration to 64bit ?
> To: ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
> Date: Saturday, January 31, 2009, 7:31 PM
> I've been reading through the various 64bit threads with
> interest. I'm on a
> core2duo machine, presently running 32bit.
>
> My overall question is what are the (detailed) steps would
> one take to migrate
> a system from, say, 32bit Ubuntu 8.04 LTS ("Hardy
> Heron") to 64bit Hardy?
>
> My video card is nVidia, and it appears they have a 64bit
> linux driver. As
> threads here have indicated, there is now 64bit support for
> Flash, Java, etc.
> So those main items are apparently addressed.
>
> One item that hasn't really been discussed is virtual
> machines: I presently
> use vmware v6 to run at least one guest OS (winXP), and
> sometimes linux VMs.
> In looking at VMware's site, it seems that they've
> had 64bit support for a
> while now, and one can run 32bit guest OS's on 64bit
> host OS's, so that
> appears to be just a matter of downloading the x86_64
> installer, yes?
>
> So, if one has a functional 32bit Hardy system, what are
> the machinations to
> make it become 64bit?
>
> thanks,
>
> =JeffH
>
Many well tell you there is not much benefit to running 64 bit over 32 bit.
I have both 32 and 64 bit hardy and intrepid installed on my AMD 64_X2
machine and run 64 bit all the time.
I would suggest, if you have the HDD
space, to install the 64 bit on its
own partition and enjoy both.
I find the alternate CD easier and better
to use than the live CD and doesn't require
as much ram to install. You will need a CD
burner to take advantage of a fresh install. You can order the live CD but don't think you can order the alternate CD.
If you must upgrade, google something like
"ubuntu+upgrade+64bit+hardy" or similar or
why not go to Intrepid. I rarely upgrade on my 500 GB HDD as a fresh install is
usually less trouble. HTH.
Leonard Chatagnier
lenc5570@sbcglobal.net


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Old 02-01-2009, 02:22 AM
Lucio M Nicolosi
 
Default migration to 64bit ?

' =JeffH ' wrote:
> I've been reading through the various 64bit threads with interest. I'm on a
> core2duo machine, presently running 32bit.
>
> My overall question is what are the (detailed) steps would one take to migrate
> a system from, say, 32bit Ubuntu 8.04 LTS ("Hardy Heron") to 64bit Hardy?
>
> My video card is nVidia, and it appears they have a 64bit linux driver. As
> threads here have indicated, there is now 64bit support for Flash, Java, etc.
> So those main items are apparently addressed.
>
> One item that hasn't really been discussed is virtual machines: I presently
> use vmware v6 to run at least one guest OS (winXP), and sometimes linux VMs.
> In looking at VMware's site, it seems that they've had 64bit support for a
> while now, and one can run 32bit guest OS's on 64bit host OS's, so that
> appears to be just a matter of downloading the x86_64 installer, yes?
>
> So, if one has a functional 32bit Hardy system, what are the machinations to
> make it become 64bit?
>
> thanks,
>
> =JeffH

To my humble knowledge, save your personal data and fresh start, but
wait for the experts opinion.

L.

--
Lucio M. Nicolosi, Eng.
So Paulo - Brazil

email: lmnicolosi@gmail.com
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Linux Registered User #481505
http://counter.li.org/




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Old 02-01-2009, 02:16 PM
Alex Katebi
 
Default migration to 64bit ?

Hi,

This is how I upgrade. It is a bit different than your way. I put my home directory on a separate disk partition. Now I can upgrade to the latest Ubuntu release 64 etc. After install I edit the /etc/fstab and point to my real home dir.


For virtualization don't bother with all the easy to use tools. The don't even work and their documentation is crapy. Just go to the KVM home site and download the latest code and build and install it. Use KVM without the redhat or ubuntu tools. Also install the KVM from apt one time so you can get the boot start up script for kvm, then apt remove the kvm. This will do the kernel module auto loading for kvm at boot time. Otherwise your guest will do paravirtualization which is very slow. The KVM documentation is not perfect but I can help you with that.


Thanks,
-Alex

On Sat, Jan 31, 2009 at 8:31 PM, =JeffH <Jeff.Hodges@kingsmountain.com> wrote:

I've been reading through the various 64bit threads with interest. I'm on a

core2duo machine, presently running 32bit.



My overall question is what are the (detailed) steps would one take to migrate

a system from, say, 32bit Ubuntu 8.04 LTS ("Hardy Heron") to 64bit Hardy?



My video card is nVidia, and it appears they have a 64bit linux driver. As

threads here have indicated, there is now 64bit support for Flash, Java, etc.

So those main items are apparently addressed.



One item that hasn't really been discussed is virtual machines: I presently

use vmware v6 to run at least one guest OS (winXP), and sometimes linux VMs.

In looking at VMware's site, it seems that they've had 64bit support for a

while now, and one can run 32bit guest OS's on 64bit host OS's, so that

appears to be just a matter of downloading the x86_64 installer, yes?



So, if one has a functional 32bit Hardy system, what are the machinations to

make it become 64bit?



thanks,



=JeffH







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Old 02-01-2009, 08:52 PM
Loc Martin
 
Default migration to 64bit ?

' =JeffH ' wrote:
> I've been reading through the various 64bit threads with interest. I'm on a
> core2duo machine, presently running 32bit.
>
> My overall question is what are the (detailed) steps would one take to migrate
> a system from, say, 32bit Ubuntu 8.04 LTS ("Hardy Heron") to 64bit Hardy?
I'm not an expert on the subject of migration, but I don't think people
mean going from i386 to amd64 when they say you can upgrade.

The safest route, and the one that is also useful long-term, is to have
two releases installed at a time. If you made the mistake to only have
one big partition instead of an OS partition and at least one data
partition, you can resize quite safely with gparted or a tool like that,
then create new partitions, and install the amd64 version on one of the
new partitions.

You can either put your home on a separate partition, or just copy/paste
your important files in Hardy i386 (even easier if your keep most of
your data on a separate partition. If you got any trouble, the i386
partition is still there if you want to pick some configuration files
you tweaked, and in the even you harm your system one day, you just
reboot on the second OS and can keep working without any downtime.

> My video card is nVidia, and it appears they have a 64bit linux driver. As
> threads here have indicated, there is now 64bit support for Flash, Java, etc.
> So those main items are apparently addressed.
For Hardy, you'd use 32 bit flash through ndiswrapper, which is not hard
to setup, but far from stellar. If it doesn't work well enough for you,
Jaunty has the new 64 bit flash from Adobe, and Intrepid has unofficial
backported 64 bit flash, both releases would work better (wait till
April for Jaunty).

Java on amd64 isn't all perfect, but for some people it works without a
glitch - just depends the sites you use. The situation is improving, and
Intrepid gives better results than Hardy, Jaunty better than Intrepid
(Jaunty is almost identical, I only found a really small presentation
error that didn't prevent the use of the complex applet I tried).

> One item that hasn't really been discussed is virtual machines: I presently
> use vmware v6 to run at least one guest OS (winXP), and sometimes linux VMs.
> In looking at VMware's site, it seems that they've had 64bit support for a
> while now, and one can run 32bit guest OS's on 64bit host OS's, so that
> appears to be just a matter of downloading the x86_64 installer, yes?

Whatever your solution you'll have a 64 bit version of the program you
use, and you can run 32 or 64 bit versions without trouble. With a good
processor, having a 32 bit VM of Ubuntu would ease your doubts, even if
you didn't have to use it - you'll know that were you to face a little
problem, you could still run the VM and get it over with.

Loc


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Old 02-02-2009, 12:17 AM
Lucio M Nicolosi
 
Default migration to 64bit ?

Loc Martin wrote:
> ' =JeffH ' wrote:
>
>> I've been reading through the various 64bit threads with interest. I'm on a
>> core2duo machine, presently running 32bit.
>>
>> My overall question is what are the (detailed) steps would one take to migrate
>> a system from, say, 32bit Ubuntu 8.04 LTS ("Hardy Heron") to 64bit Hardy?
>>
> I'm not an expert on the subject of migration, but I don't think people
> mean going from i386 to amd64 when they say you can upgrade.
>
> The safest route, and the one that is also useful long-term, is to have
> two releases installed at a time. If you made the mistake to only have
> one big partition instead of an OS partition and at least one data
> partition, you can resize quite safely with gparted or a tool like that,
> then create new partitions, and install the amd64 version on one of the
> new partitions.
>
> You can either put your home on a separate partition, or just copy/paste
> your important files in Hardy i386 (even easier if your keep most of
> your data on a separate partition. If you got any trouble, the i386
> partition is still there if you want to pick some configuration files
> you tweaked, and in the even you harm your system one day, you just
> reboot on the second OS and can keep working without any downtime.
>
>
>> My video card is nVidia, and it appears they have a 64bit linux driver. As
>> threads here have indicated, there is now 64bit support for Flash, Java, etc.
>> So those main items are apparently addressed.
>>
> For Hardy, you'd use 32 bit flash through ndiswrapper, which is not hard
> to setup, but far from stellar. If it doesn't work well enough for you,
> Jaunty has the new 64 bit flash from Adobe, and Intrepid has unofficial
> backported 64 bit flash, both releases would work better (wait till
> April for Jaunty).
>
> Java on amd64 isn't all perfect, but for some people it works without a
> glitch - just depends the sites you use. The situation is improving, and
> Intrepid gives better results than Hardy, Jaunty better than Intrepid
> (Jaunty is almost identical, I only found a really small presentation
> error that didn't prevent the use of the complex applet I tried).
>
>
>> One item that hasn't really been discussed is virtual machines: I presently
>> use vmware v6 to run at least one guest OS (winXP), and sometimes linux VMs.
>> In looking at VMware's site, it seems that they've had 64bit support for a
>> while now, and one can run 32bit guest OS's on 64bit host OS's, so that
>> appears to be just a matter of downloading the x86_64 installer, yes?
>>
>
> Whatever your solution you'll have a 64 bit version of the program you
> use, and you can run 32 or 64 bit versions without trouble. With a good
> processor, having a 32 bit VM of Ubuntu would ease your doubts, even if
> you didn't have to use it - you'll know that were you to face a little
> problem, you could still run the VM and get it over with.
>
> Loc
>
>
>
Resuming:

- It seems there is no upgrading path between i386 and 64, so
"migration" is not possible if this is the meaning. You will need a
fresh install of some kind.

- If you already have a /home partition and enough HD space you can
install a new Ubuntu 64 instance using the same /home partition and
double boot between the two installations.

- If your /home do not reside at an independent partition, it is a good
time to create one (always providing you have available disk space) and
migrate your personal data to this new area.

- Notice that some applications will have to be reinstalled because will
not run with the same parameters eventually placed at a shared
/home/[user]). (I cannot run VirtualBox and the guest OSs from my 64
partition because it was installed and configured under i386 - I have no
experience with VmWare).

- I'm running 8.10 on a barely supported hardware (NVidia 8200) and the
video drivers worked almost out of the box for 8.04 i386 - 8.10 i386 -
8.10 64. Also no problems with Adobe Flash 64 Beta.

L.

--
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So Paulo - Brazil

email: lmnicolosi@gmail.com
phone: 55 11 8272 6512

Linux Registered User #481505
http://counter.li.org/




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Old 02-03-2009, 08:21 PM
' =JeffH '
 
Default migration to 64bit ?

thanks for the feedback/ideas folks...

alex.katebi@gmail.com said:
> I put my home directory on a separate disk partition. Now I can upgrade to
> the latest Ubuntu release 64 etc. After install I edit the /etc/fstab and
> point to my real home dir.


loic.martin3@gmail.com said:
> The safest route, and the one that is also useful long-term, is to have two
> releases installed at a time.
> ...
> You can either put your home on a separate partition, or just copy/paste your
> important files in Hardy i386 (even easier if your keep most of your data on
> a separate partition. If you got any trouble, the i386 partition is still
> there if you want to pick some configuration files you tweaked, and in the
> even you harm your system one day, you just reboot on the second OS and can
> keep working without any downtime.


lmario@philippe.com.br said:
> - If you already have a /home partition and enough HD space you can install
> a new Ubuntu 64 instance using the same /home partition and double boot
> between the two installations.


Ok, yeah, I now have a 320gb disk and so can easily accomodate two or more
root partitions, and a separate /home partition, and perhaps separate
/usr/local and some other stuff. And yes, I'll use GParted to set all that up.


lmario@philippe.com.br said:
> - It seems there is no upgrading path between i386 and 64, so "migration" is
> not possible if this is the meaning. You will need a fresh install of some
> kind.

Yes, that is the conclusion I'd idependently come to -- I just wanted to
double-check it. Although I hadn't thought of the dual-boot approach, so
thanks.


=JeffH



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