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Old 01-14-2009, 04:34 PM
"David Fox"
 
Default ubuntu8.11

On Tue, Jan 13, 2009 at 8:03 PM, Keith <menziesk@telus.net> wrote:
> Hopefully I will become a newcomer to the world of Linux,namely, Ubuntu 8.11

Welcome!

> Rather than partition my harddrive ( I'm using XP Professional) I would like
> to install a programme called VirtualBox, why I'm not sure.

Virtualbox allows other OSes (guests) to run side by side with your
host OS, which could be either XP or Ubuntu (I'm assuming Virtualbox
is available for Windows, never tried it on Windows) so you don't dual
boot in that situation; rather, you work from a "virtual" hard disk
that is really a file.

To do this well, you have to have ample RAM (2gigs, preferably more)
plus your CPU must be able to support this from hardware.

You can dual boot (but of course only one operating system is running
at any one time) and not have to partition your drive.

It may not be the best (as far as performance) way to do it, but this
is what I ended up doing on my new laptop. Came with Vista, so I kept
it . But I also simply stuck the Ubuntu CD in the drive, ran the
install program, gave it about 15 megs to work from, and pressed the
Enter key. The installation ran fast, without any further user
intervention. Nothing could be simpler, and I've done quite a few
installs over the years.

What you end up with is a boot loader that lets you select between
Ubuntu and Vista. The first OS is default, so I end up in Vista if I
don't press any keys.

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Old 01-14-2009, 04:44 PM
Matthew Flaschen
 
Default ubuntu8.11

Keith wrote:
> Hopefully I will become a newcomer to the world of Linux,namely, Ubuntu 8.11
>
> I have downloaded the software to a CD ( I think you call this an ISO). I booted
> from the CD, no problem....great. I like what I saw.
> Rather than partition my harddrive ( I'm using XP Professional) I would like to
> install a programme called VirtualBox, why I'm not sure.

Then, perhaps you should reconsider. Partitioning your hard drive means
you have both OS's on their own partition. For example, with an 80 GB
hard drive you could do:

20 GB Windows
20 GB Ubuntu
40 GB shared data

Assuming you want to keep Windows, this will give you the best
performance.

> This where I need some Advice:
>
> 1. Dual boot , does this mean I can flip between Windows and Linux at will
> without rebooting my computer.... or am I being very naive.

No, a dual boot system is what I described earlier. Only one runs at once.

> 2. When I start my computer up, I presume it will give me the choice of which
> programme to initially boot up

Yes.

> 4. I would like the default startup to be Windows until I am comfortable with
> Ubuntu...if not can it be changed to Windows( remember I'm no rocket scientist)

You can easily set the default to Windows.

> 5. And so can I change the startup once I gain confidence using Ubuntu,

Yes.

Note that if you want to change between Windows and Ubuntu without
rebooting, this is not dual-booting, but rather virtualization.
VirtualBox is one virtualization program. You can use VirtualBox to run
Windows "inside" Ubuntu, or Ubuntu inside Windows.

Either way, you'll get worse performance than dual-booting (though
better flexibility).

Matt Flaschen

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Old 01-14-2009, 04:47 PM
CLIFFORD ILKAY
 
Default ubuntu8.11

Keith wrote:
> Hopefully I will become a newcomer to the world of Linux,namely, Ubuntu 8.11

That isn't a currently-shipping version of Ubuntu. You'd be well-advised
to stick with something stable, like 8.04.1 and if you're a bit more
adventurous, 8.10 seeing as you're new.

> I have downloaded the software to a CD ( I think you call this an ISO).
> I booted from the CD, no problem....great. I like what I saw.
> Rather than partition my harddrive ( I'm using XP Professional) I would
> like to install a programme called VirtualBox, why I'm not sure.
> This where I need some Advice:
>
> 1. Dual boot , does this mean I can flip between Windows and Linux at
> will without rebooting my computer.... or am I being very naive.

Dual boot is typically when you have to reboot to switch from one OS to
another. What you're doing is called "virtualization" and it enables you
to run XP and Linux simultaneously. Linux would be running in a virtual
environment created by VirtualBox.

I would suggest you modify your plan somewhat but this is a bit more
involved.

1. Make a good backup of your existing Windows installation.

2. Defragment your drive using the utility in XP.

3. Boot from a Linux live CD and shrink the partition containing Windows
to provide enough free disk space to install Linux. Alternately, you can
just install Linux on another hard disk altogether and eliminate the
need for resizing the Windows partition.

4. Install Linux on the free space you just created or on the other hard
disk drive. Be careful not to clobber your Windows partition.

5. Install the VirtualBox package(s) in Linux.

6. Using this <http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=769883> as a
guide, boot the existing XP installed on your system with VirtualBox.

This will also enable you to run both operating systems simultaneously
but the difference will be that VirtualBox will be hosted on the more
stable of the two. Unless you wanted to reclaim the disk space or never
use XP again, there would be no need to ever remove XP. Despite the fact
that I use Linux everywhere, on servers, firewalls, and my desktops, I
still have Windows for testing software we write and for the occasional
application for which I don't have a replacement on Linux.
--
Regards,

Clifford Ilkay
Dinamis
1419-3266 Yonge St.
Toronto, ON
Canada M4N 3P6

<http://dinamis.com>
+1 416-410-3326
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Old 01-14-2009, 04:59 PM
CLIFFORD ILKAY
 
Default ubuntu8.11

Matthew Flaschen wrote:
[snip]
> Note that if you want to change between Windows and Ubuntu without
> rebooting, this is not dual-booting, but rather virtualization.
> VirtualBox is one virtualization program. You can use VirtualBox to run
> Windows "inside" Ubuntu, or Ubuntu inside Windows.
>
> Either way, you'll get worse performance than dual-booting (though
> better flexibility).

On modern hardware with adequate resources, e.g. sufficient RAM, I've
found the performance difference negligible but I'm a developer, not a
gamer. Some modern Intel and AMD CPUs have hardware virtualization
extensions <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtualization_Technology>,
called Intel-VT and AMD-V respectively, that things like kvm
<http://kvm.qumranet.com/kvmwiki> can use. I have no idea if VirtualBox
takes advantage of VT or AMD-V. I've used kvm, Xen, OpenVZ, and VMWare
but I haven't touched VirtualBox yet. The HOWTO I posted previously was
based on recent research I had done into using an existing physical
installation of Windows in a virtual environment. Searching for
"virtualbox kvm" in Google yielded
<http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=542643>.
--
Regards,

Clifford Ilkay
Dinamis
1419-3266 Yonge St.
Toronto, ON
Canada M4N 3P6

<http://dinamis.com>
+1 416-410-3326
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Old 01-14-2009, 08:05 PM
"David Fox"
 
Default ubuntu8.11

On Wed, Jan 14, 2009 at 9:59 AM, CLIFFORD ILKAY
<clifford_ilkay@dinamis.com> wrote:
> called Intel-VT and AMD-V respectively, that things like kvm
> <http://kvm.qumranet.com/kvmwiki> can use. I have no idea if VirtualBox
> takes advantage of VT or AMD-V. I've used kvm, Xen, OpenVZ, and VMWare

It does - I'm actively using it on virtualbox - enabled the radio
button for AMD-V since this Athlon 64x2 can do virtualization - even
64 bits, in the newer version of Virtualbox. I have a sidux guest that
I occasionally boot as well as a Mandriva (but that's only i586).

I don't have it on the laptop (T5800 dual core core2duo). I noticed
that when I tried booting a recent (q4 2008) version of sidux that
there was a blurb in dmesg saying that it wouldn't start KVM because
the processor can't handle virtualization.

I haven't tried using any other virtualization except for qemu which I
occasionally use for quick and dirty iso testing, and less so now that
I can boot them on a laptop without having to reboot the desktop .

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Old 01-15-2009, 04:47 PM
"Johnny Rosenberg"
 
Default ubuntu8.11

2009/1/14 Keith <menziesk@telus.net>






Hopefully I will become a newcomer to the world of
Linux,namely, Ubuntu 8.11



I have downloaded the software to a CD ( I think you call this an ISO).
I booted from the CD, no problem....great. I like what I saw.

Rather than partition my harddrive ( I'm using XP Professional) I would
like to install a programme called VirtualBox, why I'm not sure.

This where I need some Advice:



1. Dual boot , does this mean I can flip between Windows and Linux at
will without rebooting my computer.... or am I being very naive.



2. When I start my computer up, I presume it will give me the choice of
which programme to initially boot up



3. If, at startup I do nothing, which programme will automatically
startup.



4. I would like the default startup to be Windows until I am
comfortable with Ubuntu...if not can it be changed to Windows( remember
I'm no rocket scientist)You can edit the file /boot/grub/menu.lst if you like. In a virtual console, type:cd*/boot/grub/(this will take you to the /boot/grub folder)
sudo cp menu.lst menu.lst.old(This makes a backup of the file menu.lst. You need to enter your password for this)gksudo gedit menu.lst(This opens the file menu.lst with the text editor gedit as root, or administrator if you prefer that word)
Now you edit the file. The first part (with its first line starting with "title * * something") is the default operating system. Make sure the one you want as default comes before the other ones in the text. You can use Ctrl+x to cut the text out and Ctrl+v to paste the text at another place.
If you think you have too many choices, you can "comment out" sections. To do that, just make sure every line of the section starts with a "#". That makes the lines inactive.If you feel that you don't know what you're doing here, even after studying the menu.lst file, let someone more experienced do it for you. If you do it anyway, and it all fails, you need to get your old copy back. Then I guess you'll need a live CD, then copy the old file back from a virtual terminal from there:
sudo cp menu.lst.old meny.lstThen restart the computer without the CD/DVD.Maybe there is a way to do all this with a GUI, I don't know.J.R.
*



5. And so can I change the startup once I gain confidence using Ubuntu,
I guess number 3 above answers this question



Thank you for your patience



Keith






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