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Old 12-13-2008, 09:14 AM
"Steve Flynn"
 
Default Speeding up the boot process

Whilst sitting on the train yesterday, bored, I was digging around in
the boot-up scripts. I admit it - I have no life.

I started with up looking at /etc/init.d/rc as its the first
interesting script that gets called in the boot sequence.

At the top of the file is the following text:

# Specify method used to enable concurrent init.d scripts.
# Valid options are 'none', 'shell' and 'startpar'. To enable the
# concurrent boot option, the init.d script order must allow for
# concurrency. This is not the case with the default boot sequence in
# Debian as of 2008-01-20. Before enabling concurrency, one need to
# check the sequence values of all boot scripts, and make sure only
# scripts that can be started in parallel have the same sequence
# number, and that a scripts dependencies have a earlier sequence
# number. See the insserv package for a away to reorder the boot
# automatically to allow this.
CONCURRENCY=none


On a whim, and not knowing if the default scripts as set up by Ubuntu
had indeed been labeled so that concurrent scripts were indeed using
the same sequence number, I made the change to

CONCURRENCY=shell

and restarted the machine. The result was a machine which came up in
about half the time it normally does (if you boot with noquiet and an
nosplash you'll see the scripts being started concurrently).

Thinking I was some kind of pioneer in this field, I checked this out
on the net last night and and was slightly dismayed to see that's it's
a relatively well known modification but not one I've seen posted in
here (that I can recall).

You can also squeeze a little more speed out of the startup-sequence
by booting with a kernel parameter of "profile" tagged onto your
kernel options. This will rebuild the look-ahead cache from the
default supplied by the Ubuntu installation to one which is more
suitable for your specific machine with your specific boot
requirements. You need only do this once.

I knew about the "profile" option from previous reading but I admit
I'd forgotten all about it.

I've already tweaked my laptop with this, without taking a copy of the
readahead files (/etc/init.d/readahead and readahead-desktop I
believe) so I'm not sure if there is much of a difference between the
default and a "tuned" version. Perhaps someone who's not performed a
"profile" from the default install could perform a before/after
comparison (or even post me the default files so I can compare and
contrast myself)

Also, my laptop doesn't have bootchart installed so I have no
snapshots/graphs of "before" with which I can compare the "after". If
anyone does have some previous bootgraphs and fancies performing this
"tweak" I'd be interested in seeing the results... purely for my own
curiosity.

--
Steve
When one person suffers from a delusion it is insanity. When many
people suffer from a delusion it is called religion.

09 F9 11 02 9D 74 E3 5B D8 41 56 C5 63 56 88 C0

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Old 12-13-2008, 01:17 PM
"Brian McKee"
 
Default Speeding up the boot process

On Sat, Dec 13, 2008 at 5:14 AM, Steve Flynn <anothermindbomb@gmail.com> wrote:
> the same sequence number, I made the change to
>
> CONCURRENCY=shell

Is your laptop a dual core machine? I saw that note somewhere, but
was under the impression that it takes a multicore/processor machine
to get any advantage out of it, thus my Atom processor wouldn't make
it worthwhile for me....

Curious,
Brian

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Old 12-13-2008, 01:28 PM
Steve Flynn
 
Default Speeding up the boot process

Brian McKee wrote:
> On Sat, Dec 13, 2008 at 5:14 AM, Steve Flynn <anothermindbomb@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> the same sequence number, I made the change to
>>
>> CONCURRENCY=shell
>>
>
> Is your laptop a dual core machine? I saw that note somewhere, but
> was under the impression that it takes a multicore/processor machine
> to get any advantage out of it, thus my Atom processor wouldn't make
> it worthwhile for me....
>

The laptop is indeed dual-core.

However, I would expect that it'll work in the same way that compiling
with "make -j 5" (for example) does, even on a single core machine....
you fire off multiple scripts / compiles because you can make use of the
dead time when one thread it waiting for a disk read or write to
complete by running other code, probing for hardware, waiting for the
router to hand out a DHCP address and so forth.

Back in the mid 90's when it took me 9 or 10 hours to cross compile the
kernel for a motorola 68030, I used to kick off multiple threads despite
having a single core processor and slashed an hour or two off the
cross-compile time.

Of course, depending on the spec of your machine, how many scripts run
concurrently, how fast your drives are and a number of other things, the
amount of time gained (or lost) is a matter for investigation. Suck it
and see - if the boot times don't improve or you see any other issues,
set the level of concurrency back to "none" and you're back to where you
started.

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Old 12-13-2008, 05:57 PM
"Brian McKee"
 
Default Speeding up the boot process

On Sat, Dec 13, 2008 at 9:28 AM, Steve Flynn <anothermindbomb@gmail.com> wrote:
> Brian McKee wrote:
>> On Sat, Dec 13, 2008 at 5:14 AM, Steve Flynn <anothermindbomb@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> the same sequence number, I made the change to
>>>
>>> CONCURRENCY=shell
>>>
>>
>> Is your laptop a dual core machine? I saw that note somewhere, but
>> was under the impression that it takes a multicore/processor machine
>> to get any advantage out of it, thus my Atom processor wouldn't make
>> it worthwhile for me....
>>
>
> The laptop is indeed dual-core.
>
> However, I would expect that it'll work in the same way .... Suck it
> and see - if the boot times don't improve or you see any other issues,
> set the level of concurrency back to "none" and you're back to where you
> started.

Actually, now that I look I see that option is mentioned on the Acer
Aspire One Ubuntu community page too.

I turned it on, and didn't notice a difference :-)
If I get ambitious I'll try a stopwatch or something, but it certainly
wasn't a huge improvement or anything.

Brian

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Old 12-15-2008, 01:07 PM
Derek Broughton
 
Default Speeding up the boot process

Steve Flynn wrote:

> Whilst sitting on the train yesterday, bored, I was digging around in
> the boot-up scripts. I admit it - I have no life.

Really? Seems like a normal sort of life to me :-)

> On a whim, and not knowing if the default scripts as set up by Ubuntu
> had indeed been labeled so that concurrent scripts were indeed using
> the same sequence number, I made the change to
>
> CONCURRENCY=shell
>
> and restarted the machine. The result was a machine which came up in
> about half the time it normally does (if you boot with noquiet and an
> nosplash you'll see the scripts being started concurrently).

I've seen at least one similar report here (or maybe the kubuntu list) -
I rarely boot, so I can't confirm, though I did make the change myself.
Anyway, it doesn't hurt to occasionally bring this to the attention of
others. Obviously, nobody's making a habit of telling everybody they've
found this great new tool.

> You can also squeeze a little more speed out of the startup-sequence
> by booting with a kernel parameter of "profile" tagged onto your
> kernel options. This will rebuild the look-ahead cache from the
> default supplied by the Ubuntu installation to one which is more
> suitable for your specific machine with your specific boot
> requirements. You need only do this once.
>
> I knew about the "profile" option from previous reading but I admit
> I'd forgotten all about it.

Um. Yes. Me too :-)
--
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Old 12-16-2008, 04:12 AM
John Hubbard
 
Default Speeding up the boot process

Steve Flynn wrote:
> Whilst sitting on the train yesterday, bored, I was digging around in
> the boot-up scripts. I admit it - I have no life.
>
> I started with up looking at /etc/init.d/rc as its the first
> interesting script that gets called in the boot sequence.
>
> At the top of the file is the following text:
>
> # Specify method used to enable concurrent init.d scripts.
> # Valid options are 'none', 'shell' and 'startpar'. To enable the
> # concurrent boot option, the init.d script order must allow for
> # concurrency. This is not the case with the default boot sequence in
> # Debian as of 2008-01-20. Before enabling concurrency, one need to
> # check the sequence values of all boot scripts, and make sure only
> # scripts that can be started in parallel have the same sequence
> # number, and that a scripts dependencies have a earlier sequence
> # number. See the insserv package for a away to reorder the boot
> # automatically to allow this.
> CONCURRENCY=none
>
>
> On a whim, and not knowing if the default scripts as set up by Ubuntu
> had indeed been labeled so that concurrent scripts were indeed using
> the same sequence number, I made the change to
>
> CONCURRENCY=shell
>
> and restarted the machine. The result was a machine which came up in
> about half the time it normally does (if you boot with noquiet and an
> nosplash you'll see the scripts being started concurrently).
I have seen this mentioned in a few different places. I have tried it
with limited success on different machines. On my desktop machine
)running 8.04) it works well but on my laptop (running 7.10) the
wireless doesn't come up correctly. I am sure that I could play around
with the order of the scripts in rc3.d but I am a little too lazy.
If you really want to see a fast boot time google "eee pc 5 second
boot". I believe that part of what Jaunty (9.04) is looking to do is
speed things up so maybe we will see that 5 second boot.

--
-john

To be or not to be, that is the question
2b || !2b
(0b10)*(0b1100010) || !(0b10)*(0b1100010)
0b11000100 || !0b11000100
0b11000100 || 0b00111011
0b11111111
255, that is the answer.



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