Linux Archive

Linux Archive (http://www.linux-archive.org/)
-   Ubuntu User (http://www.linux-archive.org/ubuntu-user/)
-   -   How to find what 'new' packages have been installed? (http://www.linux-archive.org/ubuntu-user/192431-how-find-what-new-packages-have-been-installed.html)

Chris G 11-12-2008 07:48 PM

How to find what 'new' packages have been installed?
 
On Wed, Nov 12, 2008 at 11:49:36AM -0800, NoOp wrote:
> On 11/12/2008 09:30 AM, Chris G wrote:
> > Is there a way to find out what packages have been installed by the
> > user (i.e. me) after the inital installation of an Ubuntu system?
> >
> > I like to record what I have added (and why) in the way of
> > customisation so that the next time I build a system I have some hints
> > available.
> >
>
> Open Synaptic and use File|History.
>
> You can then copy & paste to a gedit file and add notes & save for your
> records.
>
> I'm sure that Synaptic gets the logs from somewhere, so perhaps someone
> can adivse & you can then access directly.
>
Synaptic's history is only its own history, I tend to do most things
from the command line using apt-get so they don't appear in synaptic.

--
Chris Green

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users

Ray Parrish 11-13-2008 05:11 AM

How to find what 'new' packages have been installed?
 
Hello,

I don't know how to get a list of the programs I've installed in Ubuntu
myself, but I do know a couple of ways of looking up a list of *all* of
the software installed on your system. The first is just a quick
inventory of the following folders contents. Open Terminal and issue the
following commands.

cd /usr/share/doc

Then we run the ls command to get a list of the folders in that folder,
which will correspond directly with your installed packages, one folder
for each installed package.

ls -a --group-directories-first

There is also a very large file that contains your entire installed
software list with details about what versions everything currently is,
and descriptions of what all of the packages do. It is located here -

file:///var/lib/dpkg/status

It's a text file so you can load it in your web browser.

Later, Ray Parrish

Chris G wrote:
> On Wed, Nov 12, 2008 at 11:49:36AM -0800, NoOp wrote:
>
>> On 11/12/2008 09:30 AM, Chris G wrote:
>>
>>> Is there a way to find out what packages have been installed by the
>>> user (i.e. me) after the inital installation of an Ubuntu system?
>>>
>>> I like to record what I have added (and why) in the way of
>>> customisation so that the next time I build a system I have some hints
>>> available.
>>>
>>>
>> Open Synaptic and use File|History.
>>
>> You can then copy & paste to a gedit file and add notes & save for your
>> records.
>>
>> I'm sure that Synaptic gets the logs from somewhere, so perhaps someone
>> can adivse & you can then access directly.
>>
>>
> Synaptic's history is only its own history, I tend to do most things
> from the command line using apt-get so they don't appear in synaptic.
>
>

--
http://www.rayslinks.com/ Web index of human reviewed links.
<http://www.rayslinks.com/Troubleshooting%20and%20fixing%20Windows.html>
Trouble shooting and Fixing Windows
http://www.writingsoftheschizophrenic.com My poetry in web pages


--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users

Mario Vukelic 11-13-2008 05:59 AM

How to find what 'new' packages have been installed?
 
On Wed, 2008-11-12 at 22:11 -0800, Ray Parrish wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I don't know how to get a list of the programs I've installed in Ubuntu
> myself, but I do know a couple of ways of looking up a list of *all* of
> the software installed on your system.
<snip>
> cd /usr/share/doc
<snip>
> ls -a --group-directories-first
<snip>
> file:///var/lib/dpkg/status
>
> It's a text file so you can load it in your web browser.

An easier way to get a list of all installed packages is "dpkg
-l" (whose output can be redirected into a file or piped into a pager).
dpkg -l will also tell you the installed version and a one-liner about
the purpose of the package as well as its installation status.

There is also "dpkg --get-selections", but note that the corresponding
--set-selections is not recommended to set the installed packages for
whole systems, because it will set all packages to "manually installed"


--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users

"Joep L. Blom" 11-13-2008 08:04 AM

How to find what 'new' packages have been installed?
 
Mario Vukelic schreef:
> On Wed, 2008-11-12 at 22:11 -0800, Ray Parrish wrote:
>> Hello,
>>
>> I don't know how to get a list of the programs I've installed in Ubuntu
>> myself, but I do know a couple of ways of looking up a list of *all* of
>> the software installed on your system.
> <snip>
>> cd /usr/share/doc
> <snip>
>> ls -a --group-directories-first
> <snip>
>> file:///var/lib/dpkg/status
>>
>> It's a text file so you can load it in your web browser.
>
> An easier way to get a list of all installed packages is "dpkg
> -l" (whose output can be redirected into a file or piped into a pager).
> dpkg -l will also tell you the installed version and a one-liner about
> the purpose of the package as well as its installation status.
>
> There is also "dpkg --get-selections", but note that the corresponding
> --set-selections is not recommended to set the installed packages for
> whole systems, because it will set all packages to "manually installed"
>
>
Easiest way:
dpkg -l|sort > packagelist.txt
And read it with gedit. You get an enumerated list of all your packages.
Thanks Mario. I did it in Fedora with rpm
Joep



--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users

Chris G 11-13-2008 11:34 AM

How to find what 'new' packages have been installed?
 
On Thu, Nov 13, 2008 at 10:04:25AM +0100, Joep L. Blom wrote:
> Mario Vukelic schreef:
> > On Wed, 2008-11-12 at 22:11 -0800, Ray Parrish wrote:
> >> Hello,
> >>
> >> I don't know how to get a list of the programs I've installed in Ubuntu
> >> myself, but I do know a couple of ways of looking up a list of *all* of
> >> the software installed on your system.
> > <snip>
> >> cd /usr/share/doc
> > <snip>
> >> ls -a --group-directories-first
> > <snip>
> >> file:///var/lib/dpkg/status
> >>
> >> It's a text file so you can load it in your web browser.
> >
> > An easier way to get a list of all installed packages is "dpkg
> > -l" (whose output can be redirected into a file or piped into a pager).
> > dpkg -l will also tell you the installed version and a one-liner about
> > the purpose of the package as well as its installation status.
> >
> > There is also "dpkg --get-selections", but note that the corresponding
> > --set-selections is not recommended to set the installed packages for
> > whole systems, because it will set all packages to "manually installed"
> >
> >
> Easiest way:
> dpkg -l|sort > packagelist.txt
> And read it with gedit. You get an enumerated list of all your packages.
> Thanks Mario. I did it in Fedora with rpm

It's very little use because it's not time ordered. What I want to
see is what has been added since the system was installed. Looking for
things I've added in a list of 1100 items isn't very easy.

--
Chris Green

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users

Mario Vukelic 11-13-2008 04:55 PM

How to find what 'new' packages have been installed?
 
On Thu, 2008-11-13 at 12:34 +0000, Chris G wrote:
> Looking for
> things I've added in a list of 1100 items isn't very easy.

Create a copy after installing, create another copy after you added
stuff, compare the copies with the diff command.

Remember: On Unix-like systems, practically everything you want to do
with text files was solved decades ago and is supported by nifty command
line tools :)

You could also run a local subversion repository and check in log files
daily via cron jobs. Then you can easily compare them at any time later,
with tool support. You could do the same with configuration files.


--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users

Chris G 11-13-2008 05:46 PM

How to find what 'new' packages have been installed?
 
On Thu, Nov 13, 2008 at 06:55:23PM +0100, Mario Vukelic wrote:
> On Thu, 2008-11-13 at 12:34 +0000, Chris G wrote:
> > Looking for
> > things I've added in a list of 1100 items isn't very easy.
>
> Create a copy after installing, create another copy after you added
> stuff, compare the copies with the diff command.
>
Er, I can just record what I've added as I do it! Much easier than
what you're suggesting.

What I actually want to do is to go back "after the event" some days
later and try and remember what I've added manually. When I remember
to note it down as I do it there's no problem.


> Remember: On Unix-like systems, practically everything you want to do
> with text files was solved decades ago and is supported by nifty command
> line tools :)
>
Er, yes, I was using Unix boxes decades ago! :-)

--
Chris Green

--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users

Mario Vukelic 11-13-2008 06:18 PM

How to find what 'new' packages have been installed?
 
On Thu, 2008-11-13 at 18:46 +0000, Chris G wrote:
> Er, I can just record what I've added as I do it! Much easier than
> what you're suggesting.

You are welcome to do what you like. I, personally, find it easier to
capture such stuff automatically and have all the info I'd want when I
need it, but whatever.

> What I actually want to do is to go back "after the event" some days
> later and try and remember what I've added manually. When I remember
> to note it down as I do it there's no problem.

If you automatically record interesting state changes, there is no need
to remember, and to remember the right things.

A written system journal is a fine thing. Heck, I suggested it myself at
the beginning of this thread. You just seemed so interested in an
accurate record of all changes to the system, so I felt I'd offer a
suggestion for a more complete and automatic solution. Feel free to
disregard it.

> Er, yes, I was using Unix boxes decades ago! :-)

Er, um, well, it's hard to tell when you basically write "I cannot
search and compare text files".


--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users

NoOp 11-13-2008 06:52 PM

How to find what 'new' packages have been installed?
 
On 11/12/2008 12:48 PM, Chris G wrote:
> On Wed, Nov 12, 2008 at 11:49:36AM -0800, NoOp wrote:
>> On 11/12/2008 09:30 AM, Chris G wrote:
>> > Is there a way to find out what packages have been installed by the
>> > user (i.e. me) after the inital installation of an Ubuntu system?
>> >
>> > I like to record what I have added (and why) in the way of
>> > customisation so that the next time I build a system I have some hints
>> > available.
>> >
>>
>> Open Synaptic and use File|History.
>>
>> You can then copy & paste to a gedit file and add notes & save for your
>> records.
>>
>> I'm sure that Synaptic gets the logs from somewhere, so perhaps someone
>> can adivse & you can then access directly.
>>
> Synaptic's history is only its own history, I tend to do most things
> from the command line using apt-get so they don't appear in synaptic.
>

OK, then try this:

$ gedit /var/log/dpkg.log

In my log I can see, for example, that I installed nvidia-settings (I
used sudo apt-get install nvidia settings to install) on the 10th of Nov:

2008-11-10 11:28:39 install nvidia-settings <none> 1.0+20080304-0ubuntu1.1
2008-11-10 11:28:39 status half-installed nvidia-settings
1.0+20080304-0ubuntu1.1
2008-11-10 11:28:39 status unpacked nvidia-settings 1.0+20080304-0ubuntu1.1
2008-11-10 11:28:39 status unpacked nvidia-settings 1.0+20080304-0ubuntu1.1
2008-11-10 11:28:41 startup packages configure
2008-11-10 11:28:41 configure nvidia-settings 1.0+20080304-0ubuntu1.1
1.0+20080304-0ubuntu1.1
2008-11-10 11:28:41 status unpacked nvidia-settings 1.0+20080304-0ubuntu1.1
2008-11-10 11:28:42 status half-configured nvidia-settings
1.0+20080304-0ubuntu1.1
2008-11-10 11:28:42 status installed nvidia-settings 1.0+20080304-0ubuntu1.1

Note that the install doen't show in the Synaptic File|History, but it
does show in the dpkg log.

You'll find previous dpkg logs in the same location.



--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users

Mario Vukelic 11-13-2008 07:24 PM

How to find what 'new' packages have been installed?
 
On Thu, 2008-11-13 at 12:34 +0000, Chris G wrote:
> It's very little use because it's not time ordered.

The previously recommended /var/log/dpkg.log does have date stamps by
the way.


--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users


All times are GMT. The time now is 01:44 PM.

VBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2007, Crawlability, Inc.