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Old 11-03-2008, 11:05 PM
"Scott Wang"
 
Default Question about partion in Ubuntu

Hi Guys,

I have two hard drivers, each one is 160 GB. One thing I can do is make home directory in one disk and all the other directories into the other disk.

The problem of this is it is pretty waste. Installing Ubuntu may never needs 160GB spaces. However, home directory can easily exceed 160GB.


Is there anyway, I can make home directory, say 280GB, and leave 40GB for the system?

Thank you.
--
Scott Wang
im@scottwang.net


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Old 11-03-2008, 11:19 PM
Michael
 
Default Question about partion in Ubuntu

On Mon, 2008-11-03 at 16:05 -0800, Scott Wang wrote:
> Hi Guys,
>
> I have two hard drivers, each one is 160 GB. One thing I can do is
> make home directory in one disk and all the other directories into the
> other disk.
>
> The problem of this is it is pretty waste. Installing Ubuntu may never
> needs 160GB spaces. However, home directory can easily exceed 160GB.
>
> Is there anyway, I can make home directory, say 280GB, and leave 40GB
> for the system?
>
> Thank you.
>
> --
> Scott Wang
> im@scottwang.net

If you're up to it, you can try LVM. You'd need to create an lvm group
for /home/ and then one for everything else. There's a how-to on the
ubuntu wiki pages on doing it with secondary hard drives. Use the
alternate install CD if you're doing a clean install.

-Mike


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Old 11-03-2008, 11:23 PM
Bo Grimes
 
Default Question about partion in Ubuntu

On Mon, Nov 03, 2008 at 04:05:49PM -0800, Scott Wang wrote:
> Hi Guys,
>
> I have two hard drivers, each one is 160 GB. One thing I can do is make home
> directory in one disk and all the other directories into the other disk.
>
> The problem of this is it is pretty waste. Installing Ubuntu may never needs
> 160GB spaces. However, home directory can easily exceed 160GB.
>
> Is there anyway, I can make home directory, say 280GB, and leave 40GB for
> the system?

Unless you create a RAID, I think you'll have to reply on a solution like
LVM (logical volume manager). While you wait for a more competent,
experienced person to answer you might want to read:

http://www.debuntu.org/how-to-install-ubuntu-over-lvm-filesystem

But it's a year old, so there may be better intergrated tools.

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Old 11-04-2008, 01:04 AM
"Dotan Cohen"
 
Default Question about partion in Ubuntu

Like others have mentioned, LVM is the best way to do what you want.
But let me propose an alternative:

sda1 / 20 GB
sda2 empty 20 GB
sda3 swap ~2 GB
sda4 /home/media 115 GB

sdb1 /home

Now you mount /home/media inside /home/user and store your music or
movies there. The advantage is that you have separation of data that
needs backing up and data that does not. Also, you have now sda2 to
use for test installations before upgrading your daily driver.

Although I do not recommend that you configure more than four
partitions to a drive, another good thing to do is to have a separate
/var partition. When there is a hardware failure, breach, or other
problem /var/logs can fill quickly and fill up all available space.

--
Dotan Cohen

http://what-is-what.com
http://gibberish.co.il
א-ב-ג-ד-ה-ו-ז-ח-ט-י-ך-כ-ל-ם-מ-ן-*-ס-ע-ף-פ-ץ-צ-ק-ר-ש-ת

ä-ö-ü-ß-Ä-Ö-Ü
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Old 11-04-2008, 02:26 AM
"David Fox"
 
Default Question about partion in Ubuntu

On Mon, Nov 3, 2008 at 4:05 PM, Scott Wang <im@scottwang.net> wrote:
> Hi Guys,
>
> I have two hard drivers, each one is 160 GB. One thing I can do is make home
> directory in one disk and all the other directories into the other disk.

A simple solution would be to carve out an appropriate amount on the
first (ubuntu) disk and use it for /storage or something, and mount
that partition on boot. Then you can put some files in /storage that
won't conveniently fit in /home or use it like a secondary /home. I've
done that before to put larger files that won't conveniently fit in
/home, or if I am tight on disk space, etc.

Sometimes I move whole directories (such as Pictures) to the secondary
disk and then use a symbolic link so I can still easily access the
directory from my home directory. That has worked well.

And that doesn't involve setting up RAID or LVM, although it might be
a better idea to set something up like that.

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Old 11-04-2008, 03:47 AM
"Anthony M. Rasat"
 
Default Question about partion in Ubuntu

>The problem of this is it is pretty >waste. Installing Ubuntu may >never needs 160GB spaces. >However, home directory can >easily exceed 160GB.Is there >anyway, I can make home >directory, say 280GB, and leave >40GB for the system?

I think you may want to use LVM. But:

1) It requires users to fully understand concept of LVM.
2) It may need you backup everything and install from scratch that some thought don't have the time to.
3) It is quiet picky on filesystem choice. Some filesystem can be expanded or shrinked, some just don't have that feature yet.
4) Disaster recovery is quiet work-intensive. You may want to have a regular backup plan.
5) However when you employ LVM, it pays. LVM is a feature that enterprise class servers use to handle storage challenges.

Just my 2 cents.

--

Regards,

Anthony M. Rasat
Manager - Technical, Network and Support Division
PT. Jawa Pos National Network
Graha Pena Jawa Pos Group Building, 5th floor
Jln. Raya Kebayoran Lama 12, Jakarta Barat 12210
Indonesia.-
Phone 02132185562
Phone 081574217035
Fax 02153651465
Web http://www.jpnn.com
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Old 11-04-2008, 07:35 AM
Eberhard Roloff
 
Default Question about partion in Ubuntu

Anthony M. Rasat wrote:
>> The problem of this is it is pretty >waste. Installing Ubuntu may >never needs 160GB spaces. >However, home directory can >easily exceed 160GB.Is there >anyway, I can make home >directory, say 280GB, and leave >40GB for the system?
>
> I think you may want to use LVM. But:
>
> 1) It requires users to fully understand concept of LVM.
> 2) It may need you backup everything and install from scratch that some thought don't have the time to.
> 3) It is quiet picky on filesystem choice. Some filesystem can be expanded or shrinked, some just don't have that feature yet.
> 4) Disaster recovery is quiet work-intensive. You may want to have a regular backup plan.
> 5) However when you employ LVM, it pays. LVM is a feature that enterprise class servers use to handle storage challenges.
>
> Just my 2 cents.
>
I would like to emphasize issue No. 2.

Backup, Backup, Backup.

When you are doing it like this, LVM is a very good and flexible solution.

However, your intention is to distribute your data over two single
disks, which are not mirrored ex. in a RAID configuration.

Now if only Disk of two fails, _ALL_ of your data will be gone. This is
similar to RAID 0 in regard to data security.

So Backup, Backup, Backup

Kind regards
Eberhard



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