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Old 08-19-2008, 03:56 AM
Bill Taylor
 
Default Desk top missing

I turned my computer on and my background and the launchers are missing.
My task bars are there but just a blue, my choice, desktop, nothing
else. I'm running:

Ubuntu 8.04
Gnome Desk Top
No effects

-
Bond Servant,
Bill Taylor
Killer Spade 806 CE
1968-69





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Old 08-19-2008, 04:14 AM
Leonard Chatagnier
 
Default Desk top missing

--- Bill Taylor <th1bill@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

> I turned my computer on and my background and the
> launchers are missing.
> My task bars are there but just a blue, my choice,
> desktop, nothing
> else. I'm running:
>
> Ubuntu 8.04
> Gnome Desk Top
> No effects
>
> -
>
Hello Bill.
I haven't the solution but had the same issue with KDE
4.1 desktop on Ubuntu AMD64 8.04.1. All the files are
in my $HOME/Desktop folder, every last one of them but
can't figure how to restore them on the GUI. Have
also posted the issue but no response. Tried just
copying the files to Desktop but you can't copy files
to same files. My issue happened after a non-lightning
related power failure. I can log in to kde reg desktop
and the files/folders are still on the GUI desktop
just not in KDE 4.1
There should be be a simple solution to this, IMO, but
haven't found it. Maybe some kde users like Derek can
offer some help to us, hopefully.


Leonard Chatagnier
lenc5570@sbcglobal.net

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Old 08-19-2008, 11:45 AM
Karl Larsen
 
Default Desk top missing

Bill Taylor wrote:
> I turned my computer on and my background and the launchers are missing.
> My task bars are there but just a blue, my choice, desktop, nothing
> else. I'm running:
>
> Ubuntu 8.04
> Gnome Desk Top
> No effects
>
> -
> Bond Servant,
> Bill Taylor
> Killer Spade 806 CE
> 1968-69
>
>
>
>
>
>
Are you loading your home as a partition using fstab? If so check
fstab and make sure there were no changes to partition numbers.

Karl


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PGP 4208 4D6E 595F 22B9 FF1C ECB6 4A3C 2C54 FE23 53A7


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Old 08-19-2008, 12:26 PM
Bart Silverstrim
 
Default Desk top missing

Leonard Chatagnier wrote:
> --- Bill Taylor <th1bill@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
>
>> I turned my computer on and my background and the
>> launchers are missing.
>> My task bars are there but just a blue, my choice,
>> desktop, nothing
>> else. I'm running:
>>
>> Ubuntu 8.04
>> Gnome Desk Top
>> No effects
>>
>> -
>>
> Hello Bill.
> I haven't the solution but had the same issue with KDE
> 4.1 desktop on Ubuntu AMD64 8.04.1. All the files are
> in my $HOME/Desktop folder, every last one of them but
> can't figure how to restore them on the GUI. Have
> also posted the issue but no response. Tried just
> copying the files to Desktop but you can't copy files
> to same files. My issue happened after a non-lightning
> related power failure. I can log in to kde reg desktop
> and the files/folders are still on the GUI desktop
> just not in KDE 4.1
> There should be be a simple solution to this, IMO, but
> haven't found it. Maybe some kde users like Derek can
> offer some help to us, hopefully.

What I would probably end up doing is create a new *administrative*
user (so the new userid can sudo). Log in as the new user, copy the
previous user directory to the new user directory (like under a ~/temp
folder or ~/oldhome). Then use the utilities to delete the old user, and
recreate the old username as an administrative user and copy the old
data to the now recreated username.

It may not restore the data to the exact same state, but it may fix the
problem you're seeing. Using chown -R back to the proper ownership after
each step should give you access to your data.

That's one possible fix, though.

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Old 08-19-2008, 02:41 PM
Leonard Chatagnier
 
Default Desk top missing

--- Bart Silverstrim <bsilver@chrononomicon.com>
wrote:

> Leonard Chatagnier wrote:
> > --- Bill Taylor <th1bill@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
Big Snip,
> > Maybe some kde users like Derek
> can
> > offer some help to us, hopefully.
>
> What I would probably end up doing is create a new
> *administrative*
> user (so the new userid can sudo). Log in as the new
> user, copy the
> previous user directory to the new user directory
> (like under a ~/temp
> folder or ~/oldhome). Then use the utilities to
> delete the old user, and
> recreate the old username as an administrative user
> and copy the old
> data to the now recreated username.
>
> It may not restore the data to the exact same state,
> but it may fix the
> problem you're seeing. Using chown -R back to the
> proper ownership after
> each step should give you access to your data.
>
> That's one possible fix, though.
>
Thanks Bart, for your reply and answer. I'm not sure
I'm up to the fairly complex task you provide. But I
will keep your response in my Debian folder to use
whenever I get the courage to try it. Thanks again
for you efforts,

Leonard Chatagnier
lenc5570@sbcglobal.net

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Old 08-19-2008, 02:46 PM
Ulin the Tech Mage
 
Default Desk top missing

On Tue, 2008-08-19 at 07:41 -0700, Leonard Chatagnier wrote:
> --- Bart Silverstrim <bsilver@chrononomicon.com>
> wrote:
>
> > Leonard Chatagnier wrote:
> > > --- Bill Taylor <th1bill@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
> Big Snip,
> > > Maybe some kde users like Derek
> > can
> > > offer some help to us, hopefully.
> >
> > What I would probably end up doing is create a new
> > *administrative*
> > user (so the new userid can sudo). Log in as the new
> > user, copy the
> > previous user directory to the new user directory
> > (like under a ~/temp
> > folder or ~/oldhome). Then use the utilities to
> > delete the old user, and
> > recreate the old username as an administrative user
> > and copy the old
> > data to the now recreated username.
> >
> > It may not restore the data to the exact same state,
> > but it may fix the
> > problem you're seeing. Using chown -R back to the
> > proper ownership after
> > each step should give you access to your data.
> >
> > That's one possible fix, though.
> >
> Thanks Bart, for your reply and answer. I'm not sure
> I'm up to the fairly complex task you provide. But I
> will keep your response in my Debian folder to use
> whenever I get the courage to try it. Thanks again
> for you efforts,
>
> Leonard Chatagnier
> lenc5570@sbcglobal.net
>

I don't use KDE but i don't think it should be that complicated.


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Old 08-19-2008, 03:43 PM
Bart Silverstrim
 
Default Desk top missing

Leonard Chatagnier wrote:
> --- Bart Silverstrim <bsilver@chrononomicon.com>
> wrote:
>
>> Leonard Chatagnier wrote:
>>> --- Bill Taylor <th1bill@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
> Big Snip,
>>> Maybe some kde users like Derek
>> can
>>> offer some help to us, hopefully.
>> What I would probably end up doing is create a new
>> *administrative*
>> user (so the new userid can sudo). Log in as the new
>> user, copy the
>> previous user directory to the new user directory
>> (like under a ~/temp
>> folder or ~/oldhome). Then use the utilities to
>> delete the old user, and
>> recreate the old username as an administrative user
>> and copy the old
>> data to the now recreated username.
>>
>> It may not restore the data to the exact same state,
>> but it may fix the
>> problem you're seeing. Using chown -R back to the
>> proper ownership after
>> each step should give you access to your data.
>>
>> That's one possible fix, though.
>>
> Thanks Bart, for your reply and answer. I'm not sure
> I'm up to the fairly complex task you provide. But I
> will keep your response in my Debian folder to use
> whenever I get the courage to try it. Thanks again
> for you efforts,

You're welcome, glad to try and help when I can.

If you're unsure, the process doesn't get destructive until you *delete
your "current" username*. That means you can, right now, without worry...
1) create the new user
2) log in as the new user
3) create, as the new user, a directory in your new user's home
directory (mkdir ~/oldhome)
4) copy your current user data into that directory (using sudo cp -R)

If you don't mind creating a new username, you can just use that for
awhile and get acclimated to it. The deleting old user and re-creating
it is just if you're really attached to your current username on your
home computer.

In that case, you'd create the new user as an administrative user (in
the users and groups tool under administration)...say, newuser.

Log in as newuser, you should get a "clean" desktop.

open a terminal.

"mkdir ~/oldhome"
"sudo cp -R /home/olduser ~/oldhome"

You should have lots of churning for awhile. Once done, do
"sudo chown -R newuser:newuser ~/oldhome"

More churning. You should then be able to
"cd ~/oldhome"
and do a directory and your old user's files should all be in there,
owned by your new user. You can then move/copy/etc. the files wherever
you want.

You'll still be able to log in as your old user if you wanted to, the
copy (sudo cp -R operation) won't hurt it at all, and you'll be able to
test out the new user to see if it will meet your needs.

-Bart

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Old 08-19-2008, 10:20 PM
Leonard Chatagnier
 
Default Desk top missing

--- Ulin the Tech Mage <ulinthetechmage@hit-techs.com>
wrote:

> On Tue, 2008-08-19 at 07:41 -0700, Leonard
> Chatagnier wrote:
> > --- Bart Silverstrim <bsilver@chrononomicon.com>
> > wrote:
> >
> > > Leonard Chatagnier wrote:
> > > > --- Bill Taylor <th1bill@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
> > Big Snip,
> > > > Maybe some kde users like Derek
> > > can
> > > > offer some help to us, hopefully.
> > >
> > > What I would probably end up doing is create a
> new
> > > *administrative*
> > > user (so the new userid can sudo). Log in as the
> new
> > > user, copy the
> > > previous user directory to the new user
> directory
> > > (like under a ~/temp
> > > folder or ~/oldhome). Then use the utilities to
> > > delete the old user, and
> > > recreate the old username as an administrative
> user
> > > and copy the old
> > > data to the now recreated username.
> > >
> > > It may not restore the data to the exact same
> state,
> > > but it may fix the
> > > problem you're seeing. Using chown -R back to
> the
> > > proper ownership after
> > > each step should give you access to your data.
> > >
> > > That's one possible fix, though.
> > >
> > Thanks Bart, for your reply and answer. I'm not
> sure
> > I'm up to the fairly complex task you provide.
> But I
> > will keep your response in my Debian folder to use
> > whenever I get the courage to try it. Thanks
> again
> > for you efforts,
> >
> > Leonard Chatagnier
> > lenc5570@sbcglobal.net
> >
>
> I don't use KDE but i don't think it should be that
> complicated.
>
I'll let the list know the results when I try it.

Leonard Chatagnier
lenc5570@sbcglobal.net

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Old 08-20-2008, 12:37 AM
Leonard Chatagnier
 
Default Desk top missing

--- Bart Silverstrim <bsilver@chrononomicon.com>
wrote:

> Leonard Chatagnier wrote:
> > --- Bart Silverstrim <bsilver@chrononomicon.com>
> > wrote:
> >
> >> Leonard Chatagnier wrote:
> >>> --- Bill Taylor <th1bill@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
> > Big Snip,
> >>> Maybe some kde users like Derek
> >> can
> >>> offer some help to us, hopefully.
> >> What I would probably end up doing is create a
> new
> >> *administrative*
> >> user (so the new userid can sudo). Log in as the
> new
> >> user, copy the
> >> previous user directory to the new user directory
> >> (like under a ~/temp
> >> folder or ~/oldhome). Then use the utilities to
> >> delete the old user, and
> >> recreate the old username as an administrative
> user
> >> and copy the old
> >> data to the now recreated username.
> >>
> >> It may not restore the data to the exact same
> state,
> >> but it may fix the
> >> problem you're seeing. Using chown -R back to the
> >> proper ownership after
> >> each step should give you access to your data.
> >>
> >> That's one possible fix, though.
> >>
> > Thanks Bart, for your reply and answer. I'm not
> sure
> > I'm up to the fairly complex task you provide.
> But I
> > will keep your response in my Debian folder to use
> > whenever I get the courage to try it. Thanks
> again
> > for you efforts,
>
> You're welcome, glad to try and help when I can.
>
> If you're unsure, the process doesn't get
> destructive until you *delete
> your "current" username*. That means you can, right
> now, without worry...
> 1) create the new user
> 2) log in as the new user
> 3) create, as the new user, a directory in your new
> user's home
> directory (mkdir ~/oldhome)
> 4) copy your current user data into that directory
> (using sudo cp -R)
>
> If you don't mind creating a new username, you can
> just use that for
> awhile and get acclimated to it. The deleting old
> user and re-creating
> it is just if you're really attached to your current
> username on your
> home computer.
>
> In that case, you'd create the new user as an
> administrative user (in
> the users and groups tool under
> administration)...say, newuser.
>
> Log in as newuser, you should get a "clean" desktop.
>
> open a terminal.
>
> "mkdir ~/oldhome"
> "sudo cp -R /home/olduser ~/oldhome"
>
> You should have lots of churning for awhile. Once
> done, do
> "sudo chown -R newuser:newuser ~/oldhome"
>
> More churning. You should then be able to
> "cd ~/oldhome"
> and do a directory and your old user's files should
> all be in there,
> owned by your new user. You can then move/copy/etc.
> the files wherever
> you want.
>
> You'll still be able to log in as your old user if
> you wanted to, the
> copy (sudo cp -R operation) won't hurt it at all,
> and you'll be able to
> test out the new user to see if it will meet your
> needs.
>
> -Bart
>
Thanks for the added info, Bart. It is reassuring. I
presume that when I get to the new user stage and the
old files/folders are not on the desktop(kde 4.1) then
it is no point in continuing. Correct? Say the new
user desktop has all I wanted, I would just copy from
old user home the files I wanted to keep for
configuration, etc. as one way of getting the desired
results. Then I could just chown -R olduser if I had
to have it? OTOH, is there anything I can do to also
fix the old home to get the desktop back? Sorry for
the additional questions but it would be a clearer
understanding for me if you would answer them.
Thanks much for your help. BTW, I'll eventually do
this but I may dally for a bit and will post the
result when I get to it. Thanks again,


Leonard Chatagnier
lenc5570@sbcglobal.net

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Old 08-20-2008, 12:43 AM
Bart Silverstrim
 
Default Desk top missing

Leonard Chatagnier wrote:

> I'll let the list know the results when I try it.

Good luck! :-)

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