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Old 08-16-2008, 10:10 PM
"Joep L. Blom"
 
Default File permissions problem

Ansgar Burchardt schreef:
> Hi,
>
> "David McNally" <david3333333@gmail.com> writes:
>> I'm trying to be able to access and edit files that aren't in my home folder,
>> but the computer says that I don't have permission to access the files.
>>
>> I'm the only person that has ever used this computer.
>
> Files not in /home usually belong to root (the administration account),
> some belong to other system accounts. On Ubuntu you can not directly
> log in as root, but you can use sudo to access the root account.
> See [1] for an explanation how to do this.
>
> Regards,
> Ansgar
>
> [1] https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo
>
login as root:
user$"su -"
passwd:"password"

Then you are root. ( always make a root window in xterm.).
Joep


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Old 08-16-2008, 11:27 PM
NoOp
 
Default File permissions problem

On 08/16/2008 03:10 PM, Joep L. Blom wrote:
> Ansgar Burchardt schreef:
>> Hi,
>>
>> "David McNally" <david3333333@gmail.com> writes:
>>> I'm trying to be able to access and edit files that aren't in my home folder,
>>> but the computer says that I don't have permission to access the files.
>>>
>>> I'm the only person that has ever used this computer.
>>
>> Files not in /home usually belong to root (the administration account),
>> some belong to other system accounts. On Ubuntu you can not directly
>> log in as root, but you can use sudo to access the root account.
>> See [1] for an explanation how to do this.
>>
>> Regards,
>> Ansgar
>>
>> [1] https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo
>>
> login as root:
> user$"su -"
> passwd:"password"
>
> Then you are root. ( always make a root window in xterm.).
> Joep
>
>

Please don't advise an apparently new user to create a root account.
It's not necessary, and can be dangerous for someone that is still
learning how to edit non-home (root) files.

@David: please read the page provided by Ansgar
(https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo) so that you have an
understanding of the sudo command. To edit your root configuration files
from the standard text editor:

From the terminal (Applications|Accessories|Terminal):

gksu gedit <filename>

(at the password prompt enter your standard user password)

From the desktop:
Alt-F2
gksu gedit <filename>

From Nautilus (the 'Places' file browser/manager)
Alt-F2
gksu nautilus

(you are now in a 'sudo' mode of Nautilus, so you can click on file to
open in the text editor. *Caution* in this mode you can also delete and
modify critical system files and totally screw up your system - this is
akin to being able to go into the Windows directory on Windows and
modify or delete any files there, so use with caution if you do not know
what you are doing!!).

You can also install the Nautilus administrator add-on which enables you
to have a menu option in your standard nautilus to edit a file in
adminstrator mode. To install - open the terminal and enter:

sudo apt-get install nautilus-gksu

Log out and log back in. Now open Nautilus (Places) and go to the root
configuration file that you wish to modify (example: /etc/hosts), right
click the file and select 'Open as administrator', enter your password
at the prompt. Nautilus will then open the file in the text editor in
'sudo' mode so that you can modify, change it, and save it. The text
editor will also automatically create a backup file (/etc/hosts~) that
you can go back to if you mess something up.





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Old 08-17-2008, 12:11 AM
"Verde Denim"
 
Default File permissions problem

On Sat, Aug 16, 2008 at 7:27 PM, NoOp <glgxg@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

On 08/16/2008 03:10 PM, Joep L. Blom wrote:

> Ansgar Burchardt schreef:

>> Hi,

>>

>> "David McNally" <david3333333@gmail.com> writes:

>>> I'm trying to be able to access and edit files that aren't in my home folder,

>>> but the computer says that I don't have permission to access the files.

>>>

>>> I'm the only person that has ever used this computer.

>>

>> Files not in /home usually belong to root (the administration account),

>> some belong to other system accounts. *On Ubuntu you can not directly

>> log in as root, but you can use sudo to access the root account.

>> See [1] for an explanation how to do this.

>>

>> Regards,

>> Ansgar

>>

>> [1] https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo

>>

> login as root:

> user$"su -"

> passwd:"password"

>

> Then you are root. ( always make a root window in xterm.).

> Joep

>

>



Please don't advise an apparently new user to create a root account.

It's not necessary, and can be dangerous for someone that is still

learning how to edit non-home (root) files.



@David: please read the page provided by Ansgar

(https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo) so that you have an

understanding of the sudo command. To edit your root configuration files

from the standard text editor:



From the terminal (Applications|Accessories|Terminal):



gksu gedit <filename>



(at the password prompt enter your standard user password)



From the desktop:

Alt-F2

gksu gedit <filename>



From Nautilus (the 'Places' file browser/manager)

Alt-F2

gksu nautilus



(you are now in a 'sudo' mode of Nautilus, so you can click on file to

open in the text editor. *Caution* in this mode you can also delete and

modify critical system files and totally screw up your system - this is

akin to being able to go into the Windows directory on Windows and

modify or delete any files there, so use with caution if you do not know

what you are doing!!).



You can also install the Nautilus administrator add-on which enables you

to have a menu option in your standard nautilus to edit a file in

adminstrator mode. To install - open the terminal and enter:



sudo apt-get install nautilus-gksu



Log out and log back in. Now open Nautilus (Places) and go to the root

configuration file that you wish to modify (example: /etc/hosts), right

click the file and select 'Open as administrator', enter your password

at the prompt. Nautilus will then open the file in the text editor in

'sudo' mode so that you can modify, change it, and save it. The text

editor will also automatically create a backup file (/etc/hosts~) that

you can go back to if you mess something up.
I would tend to agree with NoOp. New users to Ubuntu who want to modify files which belong to configurations of the system or application environments should be followed by "why do you want to (specifically)?" and "what are you trying to accomplish?" . Simply put, the best (and worst) attribute of any *NIX system has always been - You can do whatever you want; but you need to know what you're doing. There are a good many files in the system that you can modify and will only cause you headaches. There are a number of others which will upset the system itself, which a new user will find far less forgiving than a BSoD. Those of us who are more experienced should predicate assistance with finding out the level of experience of new(er) users, and should render assistance accordingly, if possible.


Jack












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Old 08-17-2008, 01:01 AM
"David McNally"
 
Default File permissions problem

Hi again.

I can see that the reaction to my question has mostly been "Why do you need to know?".

I'm trying to run Virtual Box OSE, which says that it needs to be able to read and write a file in /dev/vboxdrv/ that it can't access.


In retrospect, I probably should have mentioned that beforehand.

Thanks again,
David

On Sat, Aug 16, 2008 at 3:58 PM, David McNally <david3333333@gmail.com> wrote:

Hello everybody!

I'm trying to be able to access and edit files that aren't in my home folder, but the computer says that I don't have permission to access the files.


I'm the only person that has ever used this computer.


Thanks,
David



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Old 08-17-2008, 06:16 AM
Nils Kassube
 
Default File permissions problem

David McNally wrote:
> I'm trying to run Virtual Box OSE, which says that it needs to be able
> to read and write a file in /dev/vboxdrv/ that it can't access.

Add yourself to the vboxusers group. Someone else can probably tell you
how to do it with a Gnome GUI, but if you use a terminal you can do it
with this command:

sudo usermod -a -G vboxusers $USER

Then logout and login again. Now you should be able to run VirtualBox.


Nils

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Old 08-17-2008, 07:20 AM
"Joep L. Blom"
 
Default File permissions problem

NoOp schreef:
> On 08/16/2008 03:10 PM, Joep L. Blom wrote:
>> Ansgar Burchardt schreef:
>>> Hi,
>>>
>>> "David McNally" <david3333333@gmail.com> writes:
>>>> I'm trying to be able to access and edit files that aren't in my home folder,
>>>> but the computer says that I don't have permission to access the files.
>>>>
>>>> I'm the only person that has ever used this computer.
>>> Files not in /home usually belong to root (the administration account),
>>> some belong to other system accounts. On Ubuntu you can not directly
>>> log in as root, but you can use sudo to access the root account.
>>> See [1] for an explanation how to do this.
>>>
>>> Regards,
>>> Ansgar
>>>
>>> [1] https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo
>>>
>> login as root:
>> user$"su -"
>> passwd:"password"
>>
>> Then you are root. ( always make a root window in xterm.).
>> Joep
>>
>>
>
> Please don't advise an apparently new user to create a root account.
> It's not necessary, and can be dangerous for someone that is still
> learning how to edit non-home (root) files.
>
> @David: please read the page provided by Ansgar
> (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo) so that you have an
> understanding of the sudo command. To edit your root configuration files
> from the standard text editor:
>
>>From the terminal (Applications|Accessories|Terminal):
>
> gksu gedit <filename>
>
> (at the password prompt enter your standard user password)
>
>>From the desktop:
> Alt-F2
> gksu gedit <filename>
>
>>From Nautilus (the 'Places' file browser/manager)
> Alt-F2
> gksu nautilus
>
> (you are now in a 'sudo' mode of Nautilus, so you can click on file to
> open in the text editor. *Caution* in this mode you can also delete and
> modify critical system files and totally screw up your system - this is
> akin to being able to go into the Windows directory on Windows and
> modify or delete any files there, so use with caution if you do not know
> what you are doing!!).
>
> You can also install the Nautilus administrator add-on which enables you
> to have a menu option in your standard nautilus to edit a file in
> adminstrator mode. To install - open the terminal and enter:
>
> sudo apt-get install nautilus-gksu
>
> Log out and log back in. Now open Nautilus (Places) and go to the root
> configuration file that you wish to modify (example: /etc/hosts), right
> click the file and select 'Open as administrator', enter your password
> at the prompt. Nautilus will then open the file in the text editor in
> 'sudo' mode so that you can modify, change it, and save it. The text
> editor will also automatically create a backup file (/etc/hosts~) that
> you can go back to if you mess something up.
>
>
>
>
>
NoOp, You're right that newbies should be approached cautiously,
however, I don't like to patronize and when somebody asks how to do
something I help him, although I agree that I should have warned about
the dangers of being root.
I come from another distribution (Fedora) where the sudo approach is not
customary and you need to be root sometimes e.g. to change permissions
or repair something in you network, or whatever. And as I always say to
new Linux users "read a good book about Linux". Originally I come from
IRIX (the Silicon Graphics Unix) and have used Linux since version 0.99.
Joep



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