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Old 08-11-2008, 05:03 PM
Bob Smith
 
Default how big does /tmp need to be?

How big does a separate /tmp partition need to be? (for a typical
desktop/workstation)

Thanks

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Old 08-12-2008, 02:31 PM
Bob Smith
 
Default how big does /tmp need to be?

How big does a separate /tmp partition need to be? (for a typical
desktop/workstation)

Thanks

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Old 08-14-2008, 12:53 PM
Derek Broughton
 
Default how big does /tmp need to be?

Bob Smith wrote:

> How big does a separate /tmp partition need to be? (for a typical
> desktop/workstation)

Anything under 1GB seems small, to me. otoh, I rarely actually use much of
it. There's always something though that overuses /tmp
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Old 08-14-2008, 01:46 PM
"Brian McKee"
 
Default how big does /tmp need to be?

On Thu, Aug 14, 2008 at 8:53 AM, Derek Broughton <news@pointerstop.ca> wrote:
> Bob Smith wrote:
>
>> How big does a separate /tmp partition need to be? (for a typical
>> desktop/workstation)
>
> Anything under 1GB seems small, to me. otoh, I rarely actually use much of
> it. There's always something though that overuses /tmp

+1

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Old 08-14-2008, 02:01 PM
Chris Jones
 
Default how big does /tmp need to be?

Derek Broughton wrote:
> Bob Smith wrote:
>
>> How big does a separate /tmp partition need to be? (for a typical
>> desktop/workstation)
>
> Anything under 1GB seems small, to me. otoh, I rarely actually use much of
> it. There's always something though that overuses /tmp

I doubt a generic answer to this question can be given, as it really
depends on what applications are going to be used.

For instance, some video editing programs default to using /tmp to store
intermediary files, and these can *really* add up. Well beyond 1G...

Chris

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Old 08-14-2008, 02:08 PM
Rashkae
 
Default how big does /tmp need to be?

Brian McKee wrote:
> On Thu, Aug 14, 2008 at 8:53 AM, Derek Broughton <news@pointerstop.ca> wrote:
>> Bob Smith wrote:
>>
>>> How big does a separate /tmp partition need to be? (for a typical
>>> desktop/workstation)
>> Anything under 1GB seems small, to me. otoh, I rarely actually use much of
>> it. There's always something though that overuses /tmp
>
> +1
>

The only reason I can think of to use a separate partition for anything,
be it /var or /home, is to preserve that data when something else is
being destroyed/overwritten. There are few (if any) sensible reasons to
worry about preserving /tmp, so I would put it in any other partition
where you have the most space to spare. ex, if you're trying to keep /
small, create a tmp in your home partition and symlink to it from /tmp

No matter what you do, if you try to put tmp in it's own partition, it's
a loosing proposition. You either waste disk space by making it large
enough, or you run out of space when something tries to create a dvd iso
image there.

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Old 08-14-2008, 02:43 PM
"Brian McKee"
 
Default how big does /tmp need to be?

On Thu, Aug 14, 2008 at 10:08 AM, Rashkae <ubuntu@tigershaunt.com> wrote:
> The only reason I can think of to use a separate partition for anything,
> be it /var or /home, is to preserve that data when something else is
> being destroyed/overwritten.

People create partitions for other reasons too.

One is some kind of performance/disk size issues - e.g. /tmp is on a
separate faster drive, or it's local when all your other partitions
are NFS mounted.

Another reason I can think of is keeping the system up when you run
out of space.
For instance, if you have /var/log on a separate partition, and
something runs wild with logging filling that partition, the system
stays up and running. If it's all in one partition then you're hosed.
I could see that argument for having /tmp on it's own.

Lastly if you like playing with file system types - e.g. you use ext3
for / and xfs for /tmp because you know you do transcoding projects in
/tmp all the time and muck with big files.

I suppose the note I should add to my original +1 comment is use LVM
and then it's easy to change later.

Brian

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Old 08-14-2008, 03:04 PM
Rashkae
 
Default how big does /tmp need to be?

Brian McKee wrote:

> People create partitions for other reasons too.
>
> One is some kind of performance/disk size issues - e.g. /tmp is on a
> separate faster drive, or it's local when all your other partitions
> are NFS mounted.
>
> Another reason I can think of is keeping the system up when you run
> out of space.
> For instance, if you have /var/log on a separate partition, and
> something runs wild with logging filling that partition, the system
> stays up and running. If it's all in one partition then you're hosed.
> I could see that argument for having /tmp on it's own.
>
> Lastly if you like playing with file system types - e.g. you use ext3
> for / and xfs for /tmp because you know you do transcoding projects in
> /tmp all the time and muck with big files.
>
> I suppose the note I should add to my original +1 comment is use LVM
> and then it's easy to change later.
>
> Brian
>

Note self, think 5 minutes before posting.. Thanks

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Old 08-14-2008, 04:35 PM
Derek Broughton
 
Default how big does /tmp need to be?

Rashkae wrote:

> Brian McKee wrote:
>
>> People create partitions for other reasons too.
>>
>> One is some kind of performance/disk size issues - e.g. /tmp is on a
>> separate faster drive, or it's local when all your other partitions
>> are NFS mounted.
>>
>> Another reason I can think of is keeping the system up when you run
>> out of space.
>> For instance, if you have /var/log on a separate partition, and
>> something runs wild with logging filling that partition, the system
>> stays up and running. If it's all in one partition then you're hosed.
>> I could see that argument for having /tmp on it's own.
>>
>> Lastly if you like playing with file system types - e.g. you use ext3
>> for / and xfs for /tmp because you know you do transcoding projects in
>> /tmp all the time and muck with big files.
>>
>> I suppose the note I should add to my original +1 comment is use LVM
>> and then it's easy to change later.
>
> Note self, think 5 minutes before posting.. Thanks

LOL. I have to admit, I didn't think about things like video. _video_ never
goes to /tmp on my system. Specifically because it always wants to use a
lot more space than I have in /tmp.

I used to make a really, really, big swap partition, and put /tmp in tmpfs
(ie, it uses part of the swap). Then I figured I wasn't really wasting
space. But Ubuntu bollixed that and I never got around to fixing it.
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Old 08-14-2008, 05:52 PM
Bob Smith
 
Default how big does /tmp need to be?

> > The only reason I can think of to use a separate partition for anything,
> > be it /var or /home, is to preserve that data when something else is
> > being destroyed/overwritten.

Or to make sure it does get destroyed/overwritten, see below.

> People create partitions for other reasons too.
>
> One is some kind of performance/disk size issues - e.g. /tmp is on a
> separate faster drive, or it's local when all your other partitions
> are NFS mounted.

Well, I want /tmp to be on an encrypted filesystem using the
crypttab "tmp" option. I think this means the partition will be
reinitialized at boot-up with a random key and an ext2 will be
created from scratch on it. (I have a spare 10GB partition I can
use for this.)

There's nothing in /tmp that needs to persist between boots, is
there?

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