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Old 08-13-2008, 04:38 PM
Jeffrey Berger
 
Default newbie: getting wireless going on hardy

Installed from the network cd in what I thought was the completely
standard way.

When I try to use Network Manager to set up my wireless card, I run
into immediate problems getting going.

Clicking "Unlock" on the Network Settings window produces the
authentication screen. However, a few seconds later, an error box
appears with the message "Could not authenticate. An unexpected error
has occurred." The error box occurs whether or not I type anything at
all into the password field.

There's no other OS installed on the Inspiron 7500 I'm using.

Suggestions?

TIA
-JB

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Old 08-13-2008, 05:15 PM
NoOp
 
Default newbie: getting wireless going on hardy

On 08/13/2008 09:38 AM, Jeffrey Berger wrote:
> Installed from the network cd in what I thought was the completely
> standard way.
>
> When I try to use Network Manager to set up my wireless card, I run
> into immediate problems getting going.
>
> Clicking "Unlock" on the Network Settings window produces the
> authentication screen. However, a few seconds later, an error box
> appears with the message "Could not authenticate. An unexpected error
> has occurred." The error box occurs whether or not I type anything at
> all into the password field.
>
> There's no other OS installed on the Inspiron 7500 I'm using.
>

There are several bugs relating to this issue:
https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/xubuntu-meta/+bug/194496
[ [users-admin] Unlock -> "Could not authenticate. An unexpected error
has occurred."]

I recommend that you ensure that your /etc/hosts file is set up for:

127.0.0.1 localhost <machinename>
127.0.1.1 <machinename>

To edit the hosts file (use this command in the terminal -
Applications|Accessories|Terminal):

gksu gedit /etc/hosts

Other related bugs:
https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/gksu/+bug/187982
[ update-manager fails to bring up the password prompt for root privileges]
https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/gksu/+bug/91151
[ gksu doesn't always pop up a dialog]

An alternate possible workaround:
https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/gksu/+bug/187982/comments/19

Before you edit your hosts file, please post your /etc/hosts file;
Applications|Accessories|Terminal:

cat /etc/hosts

Note: I also recommend that you put the terminal on your panel so that
you don't need to Applications|Accessories|Terminal each time. Just
right-click it and select add to panel. You will be using terminal a
lot, so go ahead and add it so that in the future you just need to click
the icon.




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