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Old 07-18-2008, 05:09 PM
Jimmy Montague
 
Default new guy checking in has new problem(s)

Thanks for all the help, everyone. I did the "sudo apt-get install
gparted" trick (courtesy Ulin the Tech Mage) and it worked very nicely.

I was able to delete those evil Windoze partitions on hdc. Now I have
another problem --

I can't for the life of me figure out how to reformat the drive so
Ubuntu will allow me to mount it. Something about a "mount point" and a
disk label. Then there's the fact that I don't know how to set up a
partition if I don't intend to boot from the drive. Do I still need a
"swap" partition and a "boot" sector?

And which is the first thing that has to come first?

8-) Yeesh! an' all that sh_t 8-(

And thanks again for the apt-get solution.

jimmythewriter

On Thu, 2008-07-17 at 17:33 +0000, pkaplan1@comcast.net wrote:
> -------------- Original message ----------------------
> From: Steven Davies-Morris <sdavmor@systemstheory.net>
> > Jimmy Montague wrote:
> > >
> > > Right now I need some help with hdd administration. My system has 3
> > > hdds: I have two 80-gig ide Western Digitals. One is Master on the
> > > primary strap; the other is Master on the secondary strap. The
> > > third drive is an 80-gig Maxtor mounted externally via USB.
> > >
> > > Ubuntu formatted the WD on the primary strap. It is hda. Ubuntu did
> > > NOT format either of the other two drives. The master on the
> > > secondary strap is still formatted NTFS. So is the Maxtor. I want
> > > EVERYTHING formatted Linux, in whatever fashion you guys think is
> > > best.
> > >
> > > How can I do that?
> >
> > I presume that you're running Ubuntu Hardy 8.04 (rather than Kubuntu
> > or Xubuntu). And I presume that you've already got anything that you
> > wanted off the two NTFS drives. :-)
> >
> > I'm very partial to GParted. A very good tool much like Partition
> > Magic under Windows that you might want to have in your bag of tricks.
> >
> > Go here to download the CD ISO image (0.3.7.7):
> > <http://gparted.sourceforge.net/livecd.php>
> >
> > Reboot with it in place and use it to delete the partitions on the two
> > NTFS drives and replace them with whatever you're using for Ubuntu,
> > which is probably ext3 (the default).
> >
> > HTH...and welcome aboard.
> > --
>
> Since the two remaining drives are separate disks,
>
> sudo apt-get install gparted
>
> will install gparted which can then be run from within your installed distro.
>
> Make sure you format hdb and hdc, not hda!!!
> Paul
>


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Old 07-18-2008, 06:08 PM
 
Default new guy checking in has new problem(s)

gparted should allow you to format to ext3 or reiserfs as desired.

You need to create a directory where the device will be mounted (no drive letters here).

sudo mkdir /media/<whatever-you-want>

tell gparted to mount the new disk at the above location and away you go.

No disk label is needed. Similarly no swap or boot partitions if you don't intend to boot.

When you get cocky, you can simply edit /etc/fstab, but check man fstab first.

Paul
-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: Jimmy Montague <rhetoric102@iowatelecom.net>
> Thanks for all the help, everyone. I did the "sudo apt-get install
> gparted" trick (courtesy Ulin the Tech Mage) and it worked very nicely.
>
> I was able to delete those evil Windoze partitions on hdc. Now I have
> another problem --
>
> I can't for the life of me figure out how to reformat the drive so
> Ubuntu will allow me to mount it. Something about a "mount point" and a
> disk label. Then there's the fact that I don't know how to set up a
> partition if I don't intend to boot from the drive. Do I still need a
> "swap" partition and a "boot" sector?
>
> And which is the first thing that has to come first?
>
> 8-) Yeesh! an' all that sh_t 8-(
>
> And thanks again for the apt-get solution.
>
> jimmythewriter
>
> On Thu, 2008-07-17 at 17:33 +0000, pkaplan1@comcast.net wrote:
> > -------------- Original message ----------------------
> > From: Steven Davies-Morris <sdavmor@systemstheory.net>
> > > Jimmy Montague wrote:
> > > >
> > > > Right now I need some help with hdd administration. My system has 3
> > > > hdds: I have two 80-gig ide Western Digitals. One is Master on the
> > > > primary strap; the other is Master on the secondary strap. The
> > > > third drive is an 80-gig Maxtor mounted externally via USB.
> > > >
> > > > Ubuntu formatted the WD on the primary strap. It is hda. Ubuntu did
> > > > NOT format either of the other two drives. The master on the
> > > > secondary strap is still formatted NTFS. So is the Maxtor. I want
> > > > EVERYTHING formatted Linux, in whatever fashion you guys think is
> > > > best.
> > > >
> > > > How can I do that?
> > >
> > > I presume that you're running Ubuntu Hardy 8.04 (rather than Kubuntu
> > > or Xubuntu). And I presume that you've already got anything that you
> > > wanted off the two NTFS drives. :-)
> > >
> > > I'm very partial to GParted. A very good tool much like Partition
> > > Magic under Windows that you might want to have in your bag of tricks.
> > >
> > > Go here to download the CD ISO image (0.3.7.7):
> > > <http://gparted.sourceforge.net/livecd.php>
> > >
> > > Reboot with it in place and use it to delete the partitions on the two
> > > NTFS drives and replace them with whatever you're using for Ubuntu,
> > > which is probably ext3 (the default).
> > >
> > > HTH...and welcome aboard.
> > > --
> >
> > Since the two remaining drives are separate disks,
> >
> > sudo apt-get install gparted
> >
> > will install gparted which can then be run from within your installed distro.
> >
> > Make sure you format hdb and hdc, not hda!!!
> > Paul
> >
>
>
> --
> ubuntu-users mailing list
> ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
> Modify settings or unsubscribe at:
> https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users


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Old 07-21-2008, 01:15 PM
Jimmy Montague
 
Default new guy checking in has new problem(s)

I tried to do as you said. I got gparted to delete the old partitions
and create a single new partition formatted ext3. Problem is the new
partition has a folder in it called lost+found. It takes up 10g of space
and I can't delete it. So my 80g drive is now a 70 g drive.

I can't change the name of the drive or the mount point. gparted simply
doesn't offer me the option of doing either.

Advice?

And thanks very much for your patience

On Fri, 2008-07-18 at 18:08 +0000, pkaplan1@comcast.net wrote:
> gparted should allow you to format to ext3 or reiserfs as desired.
>
> You need to create a directory where the device will be mounted (no drive letters here).
>
> sudo mkdir /media/<whatever-you-want>
>
> tell gparted to mount the new disk at the above location and away you go.
>
> No disk label is needed. Similarly no swap or boot partitions if you don't intend to boot.
>
> When you get cocky, you can simply edit /etc/fstab, but check man fstab first.
>
> Paul
> -------------- Original message ----------------------
> From: Jimmy Montague <rhetoric102@iowatelecom.net>
> > Thanks for all the help, everyone. I did the "sudo apt-get install
> > gparted" trick (courtesy Ulin the Tech Mage) and it worked very nicely.
> >
> > I was able to delete those evil Windoze partitions on hdc. Now I have
> > another problem --
> >
> > I can't for the life of me figure out how to reformat the drive so
> > Ubuntu will allow me to mount it. Something about a "mount point" and a
> > disk label. Then there's the fact that I don't know how to set up a
> > partition if I don't intend to boot from the drive. Do I still need a
> > "swap" partition and a "boot" sector?
> >
> > And which is the first thing that has to come first?
> >
> > 8-) Yeesh! an' all that sh_t 8-(
> >
> > And thanks again for the apt-get solution.
> >
> > jimmythewriter
> >
> > On Thu, 2008-07-17 at 17:33 +0000, pkaplan1@comcast.net wrote:
> > > -------------- Original message ----------------------
> > > From: Steven Davies-Morris <sdavmor@systemstheory.net>
> > > > Jimmy Montague wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > Right now I need some help with hdd administration. My system has 3
> > > > > hdds: I have two 80-gig ide Western Digitals. One is Master on the
> > > > > primary strap; the other is Master on the secondary strap. The
> > > > > third drive is an 80-gig Maxtor mounted externally via USB.
> > > > >
> > > > > Ubuntu formatted the WD on the primary strap. It is hda. Ubuntu did
> > > > > NOT format either of the other two drives. The master on the
> > > > > secondary strap is still formatted NTFS. So is the Maxtor. I want
> > > > > EVERYTHING formatted Linux, in whatever fashion you guys think is
> > > > > best.
> > > > >
> > > > > How can I do that?
> > > >
> > > > I presume that you're running Ubuntu Hardy 8.04 (rather than Kubuntu
> > > > or Xubuntu). And I presume that you've already got anything that you
> > > > wanted off the two NTFS drives. :-)
> > > >
> > > > I'm very partial to GParted. A very good tool much like Partition
> > > > Magic under Windows that you might want to have in your bag of tricks.
> > > >
> > > > Go here to download the CD ISO image (0.3.7.7):
> > > > <http://gparted.sourceforge.net/livecd.php>
> > > >
> > > > Reboot with it in place and use it to delete the partitions on the two
> > > > NTFS drives and replace them with whatever you're using for Ubuntu,
> > > > which is probably ext3 (the default).
> > > >
> > > > HTH...and welcome aboard.
> > > > --
> > >
> > > Since the two remaining drives are separate disks,
> > >
> > > sudo apt-get install gparted
> > >
> > > will install gparted which can then be run from within your installed distro.
> > >
> > > Make sure you format hdb and hdc, not hda!!!
> > > Paul
> > >
> >
> >
> > --
> > ubuntu-users mailing list
> > ubuntu-users@lists.ubuntu.com
> > Modify settings or unsubscribe at:
> > https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
>
>


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Old 07-21-2008, 02:00 PM
"David Fox"
 
Default new guy checking in has new problem(s)

On Mon, Jul 21, 2008 at 6:15 AM, Jimmy Montague
<rhetoric102@iowatelecom.net> wrote:

> I tried to do as you said. I got gparted to delete the old partitions
> and create a single new partition formatted ext3. Problem is the new
> partition has a folder in it called lost+found. It takes up 10g of space
> and I can't delete it. So my 80g drive is now a 70 g drive.

That still leaves 12.5% (roughly) of the drive space unused, which
seems to be a bit much. lost+found shouldn't take up any space unless
files end up in there, otherwise should be empty (that directory is
for files that can't be linked to a directory entry anymore on a
filesystem check). ext3 and ext2 filesystems reserve a certain space
(that is tunable) available by only the superuser, but that's usually
10%, most times only 5%, especially on larger disks. That's there to
prevent the filesystem from filling up (not a good idea especially on
root partitions) and to minimize fragmentation.

> I can't change the name of the drive or the mount point. gparted simply
> doesn't offer me the option of doing either.

You use other tools for that. e2liabel or volid for disk labels
(although they're not necessary) and mount to mount the drive in the
new partition. If you edit /etc/fstab and add an entry you can get it
to mount where you want to on boot. For instance, I have one of my
partitions mounted on /storage (for mp3, avi, that sort of thing).

/dev/sdc5 /storage xfs defaults 0 0

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Old 07-21-2008, 02:21 PM
Karl Larsen
 
Default new guy checking in has new problem(s)

David Fox wrote:
> On Mon, Jul 21, 2008 at 6:15 AM, Jimmy Montague
> <rhetoric102@iowatelecom.net> wrote:
>
>
>> I tried to do as you said. I got gparted to delete the old partitions
>> and create a single new partition formatted ext3. Problem is the new
>> partition has a folder in it called lost+found. It takes up 10g of space
>> and I can't delete it. So my 80g drive is now a 70 g drive.
>>
That is way to large for lost+found. You can look inside that
directory and see what is there. My experience has been about 10 KB is
right. Tell us what you find in that directory.

Karl



>
> That still leaves 12.5% (roughly) of the drive space unused, which
> seems to be a bit much. lost+found shouldn't take up any space unless
> files end up in there, otherwise should be empty (that directory is
> for files that can't be linked to a directory entry anymore on a
> filesystem check). ext3 and ext2 filesystems reserve a certain space
> (that is tunable) available by only the superuser, but that's usually
> 10%, most times only 5%, especially on larger disks. That's there to
> prevent the filesystem from filling up (not a good idea especially on
> root partitions) and to minimize fragmentation.
>
>
>> I can't change the name of the drive or the mount point. gparted simply
>> doesn't offer me the option of doing either.
>>
>
> You use other tools for that. e2liabel or volid for disk labels
> (although they're not necessary) and mount to mount the drive in the
> new partition. If you edit /etc/fstab and add an entry you can get it
> to mount where you want to on boot. For instance, I have one of my
> partitions mounted on /storage (for mp3, avi, that sort of thing).
>
> /dev/sdc5 /storage xfs defaults 0 0
>
>


--

Karl F. Larsen, AKA K5DI
Linux User
#450462 http://counter.li.org.
PGP 4208 4D6E 595F 22B9 FF1C ECB6 4A3C 2C54 FE23 53A7


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Old 07-21-2008, 04:55 PM
Jimmy Montague
 
Default new guy checking in has new problem(s)

Yer too late, Karl: I finally got rid of the file by deleting the
partition a couple more times and then, finally formatted the thing
Reiserfs. If I had to guess what was in it, I'd say it was my old Ubuntu
install (botched first attempt). Now I've got my Ubuntu File System on
the primary strap and my new Reiserfs disk on the secondary strap, both
jumpered Master. I can mount or unmount the new partition, and it shows
up on my desktop as an icon named "80.0 GB Media".

Problems include the fact that I have no idea where it mounts, and I
can't write to it. If I try to write to it, a dialog tells me that I
don't have permission and I should contact root to correct the problem
(The poor penguin doesn't know that in this house, "root" is a dipshit).
So the drive is there, but it's useless.

Advice?

Thanks for your patience.

Jimmy

On Mon, 2008-07-21 at 08:21 -0600, Karl Larsen wrote:
> David Fox wrote:
> > On Mon, Jul 21, 2008 at 6:15 AM, Jimmy Montague
> > <rhetoric102@iowatelecom.net> wrote:
> >
> >
> >> I tried to do as you said. I got gparted to delete the old partitions
> >> and create a single new partition formatted ext3. Problem is the new
> >> partition has a folder in it called lost+found. It takes up 10g of space
> >> and I can't delete it. So my 80g drive is now a 70 g drive.
> >>
> That is way to large for lost+found. You can look inside that
> directory and see what is there. My experience has been about 10 KB is
> right. Tell us what you find in that directory.
>
> Karl
>
>
>
> >
> > That still leaves 12.5% (roughly) of the drive space unused, which
> > seems to be a bit much. lost+found shouldn't take up any space unless
> > files end up in there, otherwise should be empty (that directory is
> > for files that can't be linked to a directory entry anymore on a
> > filesystem check). ext3 and ext2 filesystems reserve a certain space
> > (that is tunable) available by only the superuser, but that's usually
> > 10%, most times only 5%, especially on larger disks. That's there to
> > prevent the filesystem from filling up (not a good idea especially on
> > root partitions) and to minimize fragmentation.
> >
> >
> >> I can't change the name of the drive or the mount point. gparted simply
> >> doesn't offer me the option of doing either.
> >>
> >
> > You use other tools for that. e2liabel or volid for disk labels
> > (although they're not necessary) and mount to mount the drive in the
> > new partition. If you edit /etc/fstab and add an entry you can get it
> > to mount where you want to on boot. For instance, I have one of my
> > partitions mounted on /storage (for mp3, avi, that sort of thing).
> >
> > /dev/sdc5 /storage xfs defaults 0 0
> >
> >
>
>
> --
>
> Karl F. Larsen, AKA K5DI
> Linux User
> #450462 http://counter.li.org.
> PGP 4208 4D6E 595F 22B9 FF1C ECB6 4A3C 2C54 FE23 53A7
>
>


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Old 07-21-2008, 05:22 PM
"Cybe R. Wizard"
 
Default new guy checking in has new problem(s)

Jimmy Montague <rhetoric102@iowatelecom.net> said:
> Problems include the fact that I have no idea where it mounts, and I
> can't write to it. If I try to write to it, a dialog tells me that I
> don't have permission and I should contact root to correct the problem
> (The poor penguin doesn't know that in this house, "root" is a
> dipshit). So the drive is there, but it's useless.
>
> Advice?

The typical mount point is in /media.
Open the drive in Nautilus and check permissions. You may have to sudo
into Nautilus in order to change permissions.
<sudo nautilus>

Cybe R. Wizard
--
Nice computers don't go down.
Larry Niven, Steven Barnes
"The Barsoom Project"

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Old 07-21-2008, 05:37 PM
Jimmy Montague
 
Default new guy checking in has new problem(s)

I did sudo nautilus. I gave it my password. Nautilus opened. So far as I
can tell, Nautilus won't do anything with permissions. The word
"Permissions" appears nowhere in Nautilus, so far as I can tell.

Try again?

Jimmy

On Mon, 2008-07-21 at 12:22 -0500, Cybe R. Wizard wrote:
> Jimmy Montague <rhetoric102@iowatelecom.net> said:
> > Problems include the fact that I have no idea where it mounts, and I
> > can't write to it. If I try to write to it, a dialog tells me that I
> > don't have permission and I should contact root to correct the problem
> > (The poor penguin doesn't know that in this house, "root" is a
> > dipshit). So the drive is there, but it's useless.
> >
> > Advice?
>
> The typical mount point is in /media.
> Open the drive in Nautilus and check permissions. You may have to sudo
> into Nautilus in order to change permissions.
> <sudo nautilus>
>
> Cybe R. Wizard
> --
> Nice computers don't go down.
> Larry Niven, Steven Barnes
> "The Barsoom Project"
>


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Old 07-21-2008, 05:45 PM
"Cybe R. Wizard"
 
Default new guy checking in has new problem(s)

Jimmy Montague <rhetoric102@iowatelecom.net> said:
> I did sudo nautilus. I gave it my password. Nautilus opened. So far
> as I can tell, Nautilus won't do anything with permissions. The word
> "Permissions" appears nowhere in Nautilus, so far as I can tell.
>
> Try again?
>
> Jimmy

Right click? Properties is at the bottom, permissions are included.

Cybe R. Wizard
--
Nice computers don't go down.
Larry Niven, Steven Barnes
"The Barsoom Project"

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Old 07-21-2008, 05:54 PM
Jimmy Montague
 
Default new guy checking in has new problem(s)

I already tried right-click. It gave me nothing about preferences. I
tried it again just now. Same result. When I right-click the 80.0 GB
Media icon, I get a menu that offers "Open," "Open in New Window,"
"Remove," "Rename," and "Unmount." "Remove" and "Rename" are greyed out.
If I unmount and right-click again, my options are the same.

And yes, Nautilus presents me with a "root file manager" window.

Try again?

Jimmy

On Mon, 2008-07-21 at 12:45 -0500, Cybe R. Wizard wrote:
> Jimmy Montague <rhetoric102@iowatelecom.net> said:
> > I did sudo nautilus. I gave it my password. Nautilus opened. So far
> > as I can tell, Nautilus won't do anything with permissions. The word
> > "Permissions" appears nowhere in Nautilus, so far as I can tell.
> >
> > Try again?
> >
> > Jimmy
>
> Right click? Properties is at the bottom, permissions are included.
>
> Cybe R. Wizard
> --
> Nice computers don't go down.
> Larry Niven, Steven Barnes
> "The Barsoom Project"
>


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