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Old 12-02-2007, 08:10 PM
Hal Davis
 
Default Newbie video problems

I grew up in DOS and Windows, but just getting started in Linux.
Installed Ubuntu 7.10, and had it set up a partition on my Windows laptop.

First, I don't know how to interrupt the boot process to tell it to load
Windows instead of Unix.

Second, the Linux install didn't work until it reloaded using Video Safe
Mode (or something like that). Then, noticed that the bottom of my
screen wasn't being displayed, so if I moved the toolbar to the bottom,
I couldn't see it (but I was able to move the mouse down all the way,
right click, and access properties to move it somewhere else). Then,
like a genius, I thought I'd change the video selection to solve the
problem. I guess I was expecting the Windows-like temporary
installation, that requires me to tell it that it works before it's
really switched. But now, I can't read ANYTHING on the screen after the
initial Ubuntu logo.

Tried to figure out how to change the video (went online and looked at
help), and it gave me some scripts to run. Problem is, I don't know how
to run the scripts. The only DOS-like prompt I've been able to reach is
GRUB> and it doesn't like the text I input. I'm guessing that if I knew
how to get to the correct prompt the scripts would work fine.

Can someone tell me how to get my Linux system out of the ditch?

Thanks,

Hal Davis

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Old 12-02-2007, 09:46 PM
James Takac
 
Default Newbie video problems

On Monday 03 December 2007 07:10:44 Hal Davis wrote:
> I grew up in DOS and Windows, but just getting started in Linux.
> Installed Ubuntu 7.10, and had it set up a partition on my Windows laptop.
>
> First, I don't know how to interrupt the boot process to tell it to load
> Windows instead of Unix.
>
> Second, the Linux install didn't work until it reloaded using Video Safe
> Mode (or something like that). Then, noticed that the bottom of my
> screen wasn't being displayed, so if I moved the toolbar to the bottom,
> I couldn't see it (but I was able to move the mouse down all the way,
> right click, and access properties to move it somewhere else). Then,
> like a genius, I thought I'd change the video selection to solve the
> problem. I guess I was expecting the Windows-like temporary
> installation, that requires me to tell it that it works before it's
> really switched. But now, I can't read ANYTHING on the screen after the
> initial Ubuntu logo.
>
> Tried to figure out how to change the video (went online and looked at
> help), and it gave me some scripts to run. Problem is, I don't know how
> to run the scripts. The only DOS-like prompt I've been able to reach is
> GRUB> and it doesn't like the text I input. I'm guessing that if I knew
> how to get to the correct prompt the scripts would work fine.
>
> Can someone tell me how to get my Linux system out of the ditch?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Hal Davis


Hi Hal

Your system should have a menu when you first boot unless you told it to use
the entire drive at which point windows would be gone. Assuming you resized
the partion windows was on via the install you should see a boot menu. Just
use the up and down arrows on the keyboard to navigate and enter to select

As for the rest we need more info. What are the system specs, e.g. graphic
card, etc. Even if we know the laptop in question we might be able to look up
the specs online

Can you get to a terminal via CTRL-ALT-F1
You can think of that as a DOS prompt when you get there. It will ask you to
log in at that prompt first time you enter it

You also mention you can't read anything on the screen anymore. Fonts too
small? Blury,............ You don't give any detail

You mentioned changing video selection so I'm guessing you either changed the
default graphic card or you changed the resolution or refresh rate

James

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Old 12-02-2007, 10:04 PM
Hal Davis
 
Default Newbie video problems

James,



Thanks for taking the time.



I tried to be careful to tell it to set up the new partition to 50%
(moved the slider almost all the way to the left). However, after it
was done, I think it reported that there was now only 8mb of free space
on the Windows partition.



When I boot with the Ubuntu installation CD out, I don't get an initial
menu.



When I boot with the Ubuntu installation CD in, the menu is includes
Start Ubuntu, start in video safe mode, etc. I can change the video
selections, but they apparently don't get saved and doesn't change
what* happens when I reboot without the CD in.



After the splash Ubuntu screen, I see about four of the login screen
horizontally, and it goes down about 80% of the screen, with gibberish
underneath that. The screen has "untuubuntuubuntuubuntuub" going
across, with 4 logos, and a half username box, 3 username boxes, and
another half username box.



Laptop is a HP Pavilion zd7000. HP's site says the video card is nvidia
geforce 4. Don't know the exact model of the screen to put into the
ubuntu settings, but it's widescreen and 17".



So, how do I boot in video safe mode, change video settings, and then
get them to stick when I reboot without the CD? And, any idea which
video settings I should pick from the menu?



Thanks so much.



Hal Davis



James Takac wrote:

On Monday 03 December 2007 07:10:44 Hal Davis wrote:


I grew up in DOS and Windows, but just getting started in Linux.
Installed Ubuntu 7.10, and had it set up a partition on my Windows laptop.

First, I don't know how to interrupt the boot process to tell it to load
Windows instead of Unix.

Second, the Linux install didn't work until it reloaded using Video Safe
Mode (or something like that). Then, noticed that the bottom of my
screen wasn't being displayed, so if I moved the toolbar to the bottom,
I couldn't see it (but I was able to move the mouse down all the way,
right click, and access properties to move it somewhere else). Then,
like a genius, I thought I'd change the video selection to solve the
problem. I guess I was expecting the Windows-like temporary
installation, that requires me to tell it that it works before it's
really switched. But now, I can't read ANYTHING on the screen after the
initial Ubuntu logo.

Tried to figure out how to change the video (went online and looked at
help), and it gave me some scripts to run. Problem is, I don't know how
to run the scripts. The only DOS-like prompt I've been able to reach is
GRUB> and it doesn't like the text I input. I'm guessing that if I knew
how to get to the correct prompt the scripts would work fine.

Can someone tell me how to get my Linux system out of the ditch?

Thanks,

Hal Davis




Hi Hal

Your system should have a menu when you first boot unless you told it to use
the entire drive at which point windows would be gone. Assuming you resized
the partion windows was on via the install you should see a boot menu. Just
use the up and down arrows on the keyboard to navigate and enter to select

As for the rest we need more info. What are the system specs, e.g. graphic
card, etc. Even if we know the laptop in question we might be able to look up
the specs online

Can you get to a terminal via CTRL-ALT-F1
You can think of that as a DOS prompt when you get there. It will ask you to
log in at that prompt first time you enter it

You also mention you can't read anything on the screen anymore. Fonts too
small? Blury,............ You don't give any detail

You mentioned changing video selection so I'm guessing you either changed the
default graphic card or you changed the resolution or refresh rate

James






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Old 12-02-2007, 10:53 PM
James Takac
 
Default Newbie video problems

Hi Hal

On Monday 03 December 2007 09:04:20 Hal Davis wrote:
> James,
>
> Thanks for taking the time.
>
> I tried to be careful to tell it to set up the new partition to 50% (moved
> the slider almost all the way to the left). However, after it was done, I
> think it reported that there was now only 8mb of free space on the Windows
> partition.
>

I'm guessing that was 8 gb not 8 mb

> When I boot with the Ubuntu installation CD out, I don't get an initial
> menu.
>

Strange. Would expect a menu with a choice between Ubuntu and Windows at this
point. Will work this part out after we get your screen back

> When I boot with the Ubuntu installation CD in, the menu is includes Start
> Ubuntu, start in video safe mode, etc. I can change the video selections,
> but they apparently don't get saved and doesn't change what* happens when I
> reboot without the CD in.
>

When you boot with the cd in you're essentially running Ubuntu directly off
the cd, not your hd. It's a live cd so you can run/try it without installing
first.

> After the splash Ubuntu screen, I see about four of the login screen
> horizontally, and it goes down about 80% of the screen, with gibberish
> underneath that. The screen has "untuubuntuubuntuubuntuub" going across,
> with 4 logos, and a half username box, 3 username boxes, and another half
> username box.
>

Ok, sounds like the driver have been switched to either the wrong one or wrong
mode.

Use CTRL-ALT-F1 to get a console. You'll have to login there. Don't worry that
it wont echo the password, that's normal

next type "sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf" without the quotes. You'll be asked
for your password again. Scroll down to where you see the graphic card
idintified. You should see something resembling the following

Section "Device"
Identifier "Generic Video Card"
Driver "nv"
Busid "PCI:1:0:0"
Option "AddARGBVisuals" "True"
Option "AddARGBGLXVisuals" "True"
Option "NoLogo" "True"
EndSection

What does yours list there? Take note more so of the driver here.

Below that will be the monitor and default screnn areas. Might help to report
back what they say as well

At the very worst, where mine says "nv" can be replaced with "vesa" just to
get a working screen. For nvidia cards it's usually "nvidia" for 3d support
or "nv" for 2d acceleration

When making a change use CTRL-O to write back to disk. CTRL-X will exit back
to the prompt at which you can type "sudo reboot" to reboot the system for
changes to take effect for now

Do you recall exactly what you did before things went awry?

> Laptop is a HP Pavilion zd7000. HP's site says the video card is nvidia
> geforce 4. Don't know the exact model of the screen to put into the ubuntu
> settings, but it's widescreen and 17".
>
> So, how do I boot in video safe mode, change video settings, and then get
> them to stick when I reboot without the CD? And, any idea which video
> settings I should pick from the menu?
>

That would be recovery mode but you're not getting a grub menu to select that
so not sure how to without that


> Thanks so much.
>
> Hal Davis
>

Hope I can be of help. Someonelse will likely chime in soon enough

James
> James Takac wrote:
> On Monday 03 December 2007 07:10:44 Hal Davis wrote:
>
> I grew up in DOS and Windows, but just getting started in Linux.
> Installed Ubuntu 7.10, and had it set up a partition on my Windows laptop.
>
> First, I don't know how to interrupt the boot process to tell it to load
> Windows instead of Unix.
>
> Second, the Linux install didn't work until it reloaded using Video Safe
> Mode (or something like that). Then, noticed that the bottom of my
> screen wasn't being displayed, so if I moved the toolbar to the bottom,
> I couldn't see it (but I was able to move the mouse down all the way,
> right click, and access properties to move it somewhere else). Then,
> like a genius, I thought I'd change the video selection to solve the
> problem. I guess I was expecting the Windows-like temporary
> installation, that requires me to tell it that it works before it's
> really switched. But now, I can't read ANYTHING on the screen after the
> initial Ubuntu logo.
>
> Tried to figure out how to change the video (went online and looked at
> help), and it gave me some scripts to run. Problem is, I don't know how
> to run the scripts. The only DOS-like prompt I've been able to reach is
> GRUB> and it doesn't like the text I input. I'm guessing that if I knew
> how to get to the correct prompt the scripts would work fine.
>
> Can someone tell me how to get my Linux system out of the ditch?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Hal Davis
>
>
>
> Hi Hal
>
> Your system should have a menu when you first boot unless you told it to
> use the entire drive at which point windows would be gone. Assuming you
> resized the partion windows was on via the install you should see a boot
> menu. Just use the up and down arrows on the keyboard to navigate and enter
> to select
>
> As for the rest we need more info. What are the system specs, e.g. graphic
> card, etc. Even if we know the laptop in question we might be able to look
> up the specs online
>
> Can you get to a terminal via CTRL-ALT-F1
> You can think of that as a DOS prompt when you get there. It will ask you
> to log in at that prompt first time you enter it
>
> You also mention you can't read anything on the screen anymore. Fonts too
> small? Blury,............ You don't give any detail
>
> You mentioned changing video selection so I'm guessing you either changed
> the default graphic card or you changed the resolution or refresh rate
>
> James



--
Mankind and religion are like prism and light. The word of God passes through
the prism of Man and seperates into the various colours we call religions.

Penndragon.

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Old 12-02-2007, 10:56 PM
James Takac
 
Default Newbie video problems

On Monday 03 December 2007 09:04:20 Hal Davis wrote:
> James,
>
> Thanks for taking the time.
>
> I tried to be careful to tell it to set up the new partition to 50% (moved
> the slider almost all the way to the left). However, after it was done, I
> think it reported that there was now only 8mb of free space on the Windows
> partition.
>
> When I boot with the Ubuntu installation CD out, I don't get an initial
> menu.
>
> When I boot with the Ubuntu installation CD in, the menu is includes Start
> Ubuntu, start in video safe mode, etc. I can change the video selections,
> but they apparently don't get saved and doesn't change what* happens when I
> reboot without the CD in.
>
> After the splash Ubuntu screen, I see about four of the login screen
> horizontally, and it goes down about 80% of the screen, with gibberish
> underneath that. The screen has "untuubuntuubuntuubuntuub" going across,
> with 4 logos, and a half username box, 3 username boxes, and another half
> username box.
>
> Laptop is a HP Pavilion zd7000. HP's site says the video card is nvidia
> geforce 4. Don't know the exact model of the screen to put into the ubuntu
> settings, but it's widescreen and 17".
>
> So, how do I boot in video safe mode, change video settings, and then get
> them to stick when I reboot without the CD? And, any idea which video
> settings I should pick from the menu?
>
> Thanks so much.
>
> Hal Davis
>
> James Takac wrote:
> On Monday 03 December 2007 07:10:44 Hal Davis wrote:
>
> I grew up in DOS and Windows, but just getting started in Linux.
> Installed Ubuntu 7.10, and had it set up a partition on my Windows laptop.
>
> First, I don't know how to interrupt the boot process to tell it to load
> Windows instead of Unix.
>
> Second, the Linux install didn't work until it reloaded using Video Safe
> Mode (or something like that). Then, noticed that the bottom of my
> screen wasn't being displayed, so if I moved the toolbar to the bottom,
> I couldn't see it (but I was able to move the mouse down all the way,
> right click, and access properties to move it somewhere else). Then,
> like a genius, I thought I'd change the video selection to solve the
> problem. I guess I was expecting the Windows-like temporary
> installation, that requires me to tell it that it works before it's
> really switched. But now, I can't read ANYTHING on the screen after the
> initial Ubuntu logo.
>
> Tried to figure out how to change the video (went online and looked at
> help), and it gave me some scripts to run. Problem is, I don't know how
> to run the scripts. The only DOS-like prompt I've been able to reach is
> GRUB> and it doesn't like the text I input. I'm guessing that if I knew
> how to get to the correct prompt the scripts would work fine.
>
> Can someone tell me how to get my Linux system out of the ditch?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Hal Davis
>
>
>
> Hi Hal
>
> Your system should have a menu when you first boot unless you told it to
> use the entire drive at which point windows would be gone. Assuming you
> resized the partion windows was on via the install you should see a boot
> menu. Just use the up and down arrows on the keyboard to navigate and enter
> to select
>
> As for the rest we need more info. What are the system specs, e.g. graphic
> card, etc. Even if we know the laptop in question we might be able to look
> up the specs online
>
> Can you get to a terminal via CTRL-ALT-F1
> You can think of that as a DOS prompt when you get there. It will ask you
> to log in at that prompt first time you enter it
>
> You also mention you can't read anything on the screen anymore. Fonts too
> small? Blury,............ You don't give any detail
>
> You mentioned changing video selection so I'm guessing you either changed
> the default graphic card or you changed the resolution or refresh rate
>
> James



Hi Hal

Forgot to mention. Best thing for a newbie to install nvidia drivers is likely
to be the envy script which can be found at

http://albertomilone.com/nvidia_scripts1.html

James

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Old 12-02-2007, 11:06 PM
andy baxter
 
Default Newbie video problems

James Takac wrote:
>> After the splash Ubuntu screen, I see about four of the login screen
>> horizontally, and it goes down about 80% of the screen, with gibberish
>> underneath that. The screen has "untuubuntuubuntuubuntuub" going across,
>> with 4 logos, and a half username box, 3 username boxes, and another half
>> username box.
>>
>>
>
> Ok, sounds like the driver have been switched to either the wrong one or wrong
> mode.
>
> Use CTRL-ALT-F1 to get a console. You'll have to login there. Don't worry that
> it wont echo the password, that's normal
>
> next type "sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf" without the quotes. You'll be asked
> for your password again. Scroll down to where you see the graphic card
> idintified. You should see something resembling the following
>
> Section "Device"
> Identifier "Generic Video Card"
> Driver "nv"
> Busid "PCI:1:0:0"
> Option "AddARGBVisuals" "True"
> Option "AddARGBGLXVisuals" "True"
> Option "NoLogo" "True"
> EndSection
>
> What does yours list there? Take note more so of the driver here.
>
> Below that will be the monitor and default screnn areas. Might help to report
> back what they say as well
>
> At the very worst, where mine says "nv" can be replaced with "vesa" just to
> get a working screen. For nvidia cards it's usually "nvidia" for 3d support
> or "nv" for 2d acceleration
>
> When making a change use CTRL-O to write back to disk. CTRL-X will exit back
> to the prompt at which you can type "sudo reboot" to reboot the system for
> changes to take effect for now
>
> Do you recall exactly what you did before things went awry?
>
I was going to suggest exactly the same thing, but realised you can do
the same thing in a way that may be easier for a new user by running
dpkg-reconfigure.

I.e.:

get a terminal using ctrl-alt-f1
log in as a normal user.
type:
sudo -i
and type your user's password to become root.
then type:
dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg

This will start a text mode menu system which lets you reconfigure the
graphics card. If you say yes whenever it asks you to autodetect
something, and choose the selected option the rest of the time, you
should get a working configuration. If not, try setting the driver to
'vesa' instead of (probably) 'nv' when that option comes up.

You need to type:
/etc/init.d/gdm restart

to restart the graphics system (x server) after you've changed the
configuration. You shouldn't need to reboot.

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Old 12-02-2007, 11:36 PM
James Takac
 
Default Newbie video problems

On Monday 03 December 2007 10:06:30 andy baxter wrote:
> James Takac wrote:
> >> After the splash Ubuntu screen, I see about four of the login screen
> >> horizontally, and it goes down about 80% of the screen, with gibberish
> >> underneath that. The screen has "untuubuntuubuntuubuntuub" going across,
> >> with 4 logos, and a half username box, 3 username boxes, and another
> >> half username box.
> >
> > Ok, sounds like the driver have been switched to either the wrong one or
> > wrong mode.
> >
> > Use CTRL-ALT-F1 to get a console. You'll have to login there. Don't worry
> > that it wont echo the password, that's normal
> >
> > next type "sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf" without the quotes. You'll be
> > asked for your password again. Scroll down to where you see the graphic
> > card idintified. You should see something resembling the following
> >
> > Section "Device"
> > Identifier "Generic Video Card"
> > Driver "nv"
> > Busid "PCI:1:0:0"
> > Option "AddARGBVisuals" "True"
> > Option "AddARGBGLXVisuals" "True"
> > Option "NoLogo" "True"
> > EndSection
> >
> > What does yours list there? Take note more so of the driver here.
> >
> > Below that will be the monitor and default screnn areas. Might help to
> > report back what they say as well
> >
> > At the very worst, where mine says "nv" can be replaced with "vesa" just
> > to get a working screen. For nvidia cards it's usually "nvidia" for 3d
> > support or "nv" for 2d acceleration
> >
> > When making a change use CTRL-O to write back to disk. CTRL-X will exit
> > back to the prompt at which you can type "sudo reboot" to reboot the
> > system for changes to take effect for now
> >
> > Do you recall exactly what you did before things went awry?
>
> I was going to suggest exactly the same thing, but realised you can do
> the same thing in a way that may be easier for a new user by running
> dpkg-reconfigure.
>
> I.e.:
>
> get a terminal using ctrl-alt-f1
> log in as a normal user.
> type:
> sudo -i
> and type your user's password to become root.
> then type:
> dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg
>
> This will start a text mode menu system which lets you reconfigure the
> graphics card. If you say yes whenever it asks you to autodetect
> something, and choose the selected option the rest of the time, you
> should get a working configuration. If not, try setting the driver to
> 'vesa' instead of (probably) 'nv' when that option comes up.
>
> You need to type:
> /etc/init.d/gdm restart
>
> to restart the graphics system (x server) after you've changed the
> configuration. You shouldn't need to reboot.



Hi Andy

You forgot to stop the gdm with
/etc/init.d/gdm stop
before restarting it

However good point that it may well be easier for him as a newbie. Hell, I'm
no expert myself

James

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Old 12-03-2007, 12:01 AM
Hal Davis
 
Default Newbie video problems

James,



Thanks again for taking the time. I'm feeling incredibly lost.



Booted the computer. Killed the computer. Managed to eject the CD and
booted again. Got the multiple-on-one log-in screed. Did the
Ctrl-alt-F1 thing. Entered username and password. Then, every few
seconds I keep getting the line:

[** 90.000000] bcm43xx: Error: Microcode "bcm43xx_microcode4.fw" not
available or load failed.



In between messages, I typed what you gave me to type.



found:

Section "Device"

Identifier "Generic Video Card"

Boardname "vesa"

Busid "PCI:1:0:0"



Section "Monitor"

Identifier "Generic Monitor"

Vendorname "Hewlett-Packard"

Modelname "HP Pavilion M45/S40 Monitor"

Horizsync 31.468-50

vertrefresh 56.0-750



then several modeline "800x66@56".... kinda things



Now, are you saying I should find something I want to change, typeover
the wrong information, and then type ctrl-O ("oh" as in "Oscar") and
the changed info will be saved to the disk? What about the intervening
lines that have been inserted about the microcode4.fw?



Hal Davis



James Takac wrote:

Hi Hal

On Monday 03 December 2007 09:04:20 Hal Davis wrote:


James,

Thanks for taking the time.

I tried to be careful to tell it to set up the new partition to 50% (moved
the slider almost all the way to the left). However, after it was done, I
think it reported that there was now only 8mb of free space on the Windows
partition.




I'm guessing that was 8 gb not 8 mb



When I boot with the Ubuntu installation CD out, I don't get an initial
menu.




Strange. Would expect a menu with a choice between Ubuntu and Windows at this
point. Will work this part out after we get your screen back



When I boot with the Ubuntu installation CD in, the menu is includes Start
Ubuntu, start in video safe mode, etc. I can change the video selections,
but they apparently don't get saved and doesn't change what* happens when I
reboot without the CD in.




When you boot with the cd in you're essentially running Ubuntu directly off
the cd, not your hd. It's a live cd so you can run/try it without installing
first.



After the splash Ubuntu screen, I see about four of the login screen
horizontally, and it goes down about 80% of the screen, with gibberish
underneath that. The screen has "untuubuntuubuntuubuntuub" going across,
with 4 logos, and a half username box, 3 username boxes, and another half
username box.




Ok, sounds like the driver have been switched to either the wrong one or wrong
mode.

Use CTRL-ALT-F1 to get a console. You'll have to login there. Don't worry that
it wont echo the password, that's normal

next type "sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf" without the quotes. You'll be asked
for your password again. Scroll down to where you see the graphic card
idintified. You should see something resembling the following

Section "Device"
Identifier "Generic Video Card"
Driver "nv"
Busid "PCI:1:0:0"
Option "AddARGBVisuals" "True"
Option "AddARGBGLXVisuals" "True"
Option "NoLogo" "True"
EndSection

What does yours list there? Take note more so of the driver here.

Below that will be the monitor and default screnn areas. Might help to report
back what they say as well

At the very worst, where mine says "nv" can be replaced with "vesa" just to
get a working screen. For nvidia cards it's usually "nvidia" for 3d support
or "nv" for 2d acceleration

When making a change use CTRL-O to write back to disk. CTRL-X will exit back
to the prompt at which you can type "sudo reboot" to reboot the system for
changes to take effect for now

Do you recall exactly what you did before things went awry?



Laptop is a HP Pavilion zd7000. HP's site says the video card is nvidia
geforce 4. Don't know the exact model of the screen to put into the ubuntu
settings, but it's widescreen and 17".

So, how do I boot in video safe mode, change video settings, and then get
them to stick when I reboot without the CD? And, any idea which video
settings I should pick from the menu?




That would be recovery mode but you're not getting a grub menu to select that
so not sure how to without that




Thanks so much.

Hal Davis




Hope I can be of help. Someonelse will likely chime in soon enough

James


James Takac wrote:
On Monday 03 December 2007 07:10:44 Hal Davis wrote:

I grew up in DOS and Windows, but just getting started in Linux.
Installed Ubuntu 7.10, and had it set up a partition on my Windows laptop.

First, I don't know how to interrupt the boot process to tell it to load
Windows instead of Unix.

Second, the Linux install didn't work until it reloaded using Video Safe
Mode (or something like that). Then, noticed that the bottom of my
screen wasn't being displayed, so if I moved the toolbar to the bottom,
I couldn't see it (but I was able to move the mouse down all the way,
right click, and access properties to move it somewhere else). Then,
like a genius, I thought I'd change the video selection to solve the
problem. I guess I was expecting the Windows-like temporary
installation, that requires me to tell it that it works before it's
really switched. But now, I can't read ANYTHING on the screen after the
initial Ubuntu logo.

Tried to figure out how to change the video (went online and looked at
help), and it gave me some scripts to run. Problem is, I don't know how
to run the scripts. The only DOS-like prompt I've been able to reach is
GRUB> and it doesn't like the text I input. I'm guessing that if I knew
how to get to the correct prompt the scripts would work fine.

Can someone tell me how to get my Linux system out of the ditch?

Thanks,

Hal Davis



Hi Hal

Your system should have a menu when you first boot unless you told it to
use the entire drive at which point windows would be gone. Assuming you
resized the partion windows was on via the install you should see a boot
menu. Just use the up and down arrows on the keyboard to navigate and enter
to select

As for the rest we need more info. What are the system specs, e.g. graphic
card, etc. Even if we know the laptop in question we might be able to look
up the specs online

Can you get to a terminal via CTRL-ALT-F1
You can think of that as a DOS prompt when you get there. It will ask you
to log in at that prompt first time you enter it

You also mention you can't read anything on the screen anymore. Fonts too
small? Blury,............ You don't give any detail

You mentioned changing video selection so I'm guessing you either changed
the default graphic card or you changed the resolution or refresh rate

James










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Old 12-03-2007, 12:02 AM
Hal Davis
 
Default Newbie video problems

OK, it's good to know where the scripts are and such on the internet,
but I haven't a clue about how to get on the internet from a command
prompt, nor how to run a script.

Hal



James Takac wrote:

On Monday 03 December 2007 09:04:20 Hal Davis wrote:


James,

Thanks for taking the time.

I tried to be careful to tell it to set up the new partition to 50% (moved
the slider almost all the way to the left). However, after it was done, I
think it reported that there was now only 8mb of free space on the Windows
partition.

When I boot with the Ubuntu installation CD out, I don't get an initial
menu.

When I boot with the Ubuntu installation CD in, the menu is includes Start
Ubuntu, start in video safe mode, etc. I can change the video selections,
but they apparently don't get saved and doesn't change what* happens when I
reboot without the CD in.

After the splash Ubuntu screen, I see about four of the login screen
horizontally, and it goes down about 80% of the screen, with gibberish
underneath that. The screen has "untuubuntuubuntuubuntuub" going across,
with 4 logos, and a half username box, 3 username boxes, and another half
username box.

Laptop is a HP Pavilion zd7000. HP's site says the video card is nvidia
geforce 4. Don't know the exact model of the screen to put into the ubuntu
settings, but it's widescreen and 17".

So, how do I boot in video safe mode, change video settings, and then get
them to stick when I reboot without the CD? And, any idea which video
settings I should pick from the menu?

Thanks so much.

Hal Davis

James Takac wrote:
On Monday 03 December 2007 07:10:44 Hal Davis wrote:

I grew up in DOS and Windows, but just getting started in Linux.
Installed Ubuntu 7.10, and had it set up a partition on my Windows laptop.

First, I don't know how to interrupt the boot process to tell it to load
Windows instead of Unix.

Second, the Linux install didn't work until it reloaded using Video Safe
Mode (or something like that). Then, noticed that the bottom of my
screen wasn't being displayed, so if I moved the toolbar to the bottom,
I couldn't see it (but I was able to move the mouse down all the way,
right click, and access properties to move it somewhere else). Then,
like a genius, I thought I'd change the video selection to solve the
problem. I guess I was expecting the Windows-like temporary
installation, that requires me to tell it that it works before it's
really switched. But now, I can't read ANYTHING on the screen after the
initial Ubuntu logo.

Tried to figure out how to change the video (went online and looked at
help), and it gave me some scripts to run. Problem is, I don't know how
to run the scripts. The only DOS-like prompt I've been able to reach is
GRUB> and it doesn't like the text I input. I'm guessing that if I knew
how to get to the correct prompt the scripts would work fine.

Can someone tell me how to get my Linux system out of the ditch?

Thanks,

Hal Davis



Hi Hal

Your system should have a menu when you first boot unless you told it to
use the entire drive at which point windows would be gone. Assuming you
resized the partion windows was on via the install you should see a boot
menu. Just use the up and down arrows on the keyboard to navigate and enter
to select

As for the rest we need more info. What are the system specs, e.g. graphic
card, etc. Even if we know the laptop in question we might be able to look
up the specs online

Can you get to a terminal via CTRL-ALT-F1
You can think of that as a DOS prompt when you get there. It will ask you
to log in at that prompt first time you enter it

You also mention you can't read anything on the screen anymore. Fonts too
small? Blury,............ You don't give any detail

You mentioned changing video selection so I'm guessing you either changed
the default graphic card or you changed the resolution or refresh rate

James





Hi Hal

Forgot to mention. Best thing for a newbie to install nvidia drivers is likely
to be the envy script which can be found at

http://albertomilone.com/nvidia_scripts1.html

James






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Old 12-03-2007, 12:14 AM
Hal Davis
 
Default Newbie video problems

Andy, James,



After trying Andy's suggestion, and fumbling and guessing my way
through a large number of things, I now have Ubuntu up and running in
low graphics mode.



I think I know what graphics adaptor to tell it to use, but I don't
know what to tell it about my monitor. Looking at the HP tech support
web site, it's not at all clear which monitor was installed on my
laptop. Do I just guess-and-test until something works?



Thanks,



Hal



andy baxter wrote:

James Takac wrote:



After the splash Ubuntu screen, I see about four of the login screen
horizontally, and it goes down about 80% of the screen, with gibberish
underneath that. The screen has "untuubuntuubuntuubuntuub" going across,
with 4 logos, and a half username box, 3 username boxes, and another half
username box.




Ok, sounds like the driver have been switched to either the wrong one or wrong
mode.

Use CTRL-ALT-F1 to get a console. You'll have to login there. Don't worry that
it wont echo the password, that's normal

next type "sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf" without the quotes. You'll be asked
for your password again. Scroll down to where you see the graphic card
idintified. You should see something resembling the following

Section "Device"
Identifier "Generic Video Card"
Driver "nv"
Busid "PCI:1:0:0"
Option "AddARGBVisuals" "True"
Option "AddARGBGLXVisuals" "True"
Option "NoLogo" "True"
EndSection

What does yours list there? Take note more so of the driver here.

Below that will be the monitor and default screnn areas. Might help to report
back what they say as well

At the very worst, where mine says "nv" can be replaced with "vesa" just to
get a working screen. For nvidia cards it's usually "nvidia" for 3d support
or "nv" for 2d acceleration

When making a change use CTRL-O to write back to disk. CTRL-X will exit back
to the prompt at which you can type "sudo reboot" to reboot the system for
changes to take effect for now

Do you recall exactly what you did before things went awry?



I was going to suggest exactly the same thing, but realised you can do
the same thing in a way that may be easier for a new user by running
dpkg-reconfigure.

I.e.:

get a terminal using ctrl-alt-f1
log in as a normal user.
type:
sudo -i
and type your user's password to become root.
then type:
dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg

This will start a text mode menu system which lets you reconfigure the
graphics card. If you say yes whenever it asks you to autodetect
something, and choose the selected option the rest of the time, you
should get a working configuration. If not, try setting the driver to
'vesa' instead of (probably) 'nv' when that option comes up.

You need to type:
/etc/init.d/gdm restart

to restart the graphics system (x server) after you've changed the
configuration. You shouldn't need to reboot.






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