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Old 09-02-2010, 11:53 PM
Ric Moore
 
Default hi

On Thu, 2010-09-02 at 20:57 +0100, Colin Law wrote:

> > Yes that's a drawback of the technology. But after all, that also we humans
> > have created! But we have not created emotions, the later is natural,
> > superseding the creation.
>
> Now that is a deep thought.

Namaskar. Ric


--
My father, Victor Moore (Vic) used to say:
"There are two Great Sins in the world...
..the Sin of Ignorance, and the Sin of Stupidity.
Only the former may be overcome." R.I.P. Dad.
Linux user# 44256


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Old 09-03-2010, 12:45 AM
Parshwa Murdia
 
Default hi

On Fri, Sep 3, 2010 at 1:27 AM, Colin Law <clanlaw@googlemail.com> wrote:



Just to make sure everyone is clear on the matter, so am I. *Not that

it matters much, here at least.


Ok.

*




Now that is a deep thought.


It might be!
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Old 09-03-2010, 12:47 AM
Parshwa Murdia
 
Default hi

On Fri, Sep 3, 2010 at 2:07 AM, Colin Law <clanlaw@googlemail.com> wrote:


I think that is the most beautiful description of backing up a hard

disk that I have ever read.

It might be but we should know how it is stored in a hard-disk, it must be charge residing somewhere over a hard-disk!
*


I think actually the data is stored

magnetically rather than as charge in CMOS circuits, but who cares.

Emoticon added because emotions supersede the Creation. *
*
It might be stored magnetically.
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Old 09-03-2010, 12:49 AM
Parshwa Murdia
 
Default hi

On Fri, Sep 3, 2010 at 2:19 AM, Gurus Knugum <gurus.knugum@gmail.com> wrote:


You can also make a Live USB stick. If it fits on a CD, it will sure fit

on a 2 GB stick.

But Ubuntu 10.04 would not be less (or equal to) than 2 Gb, that I guess.
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Old 09-03-2010, 12:51 AM
Parshwa Murdia
 
Default hi

On Fri, Sep 3, 2010 at 5:23 AM, Ric Moore <wayward4now@gmail.com> wrote:


Namaskar. Ric


Namaskar, .
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Old 09-03-2010, 01:22 AM
James Takac
 
Default hi

Hi Collin

On Thursday 02 September 2010 23:14:08 Colin Law wrote:
> On 2 September 2010 13:47, Parshwa Murdia <ubuntu.bkn@gmail.com> wrote:
> > On Thu, Sep 2, 2010 at 6:06 PM, Colin Law <clanlaw@googlemail.com> wrote:
> >> It is up to you, you can replace the existing system if you want to,
> >> or if you have space you can shrink the existing partitions and
> >> install Ubuntu as a third boot option. *Make sure you back up
> >> everything important first of course.
> >
> > I am having 250 GB in all but 150 GB is for Windows which is having many
> > useful softwares (right now). So for me, the only possible option would
> > be to use the 100 GB space in which I have Fedora 11, replacing that and
> > installing Ubuntu would be okay. But if I am replacing that only, in that
> > case also, should I take Windows back-up?
>
> You should always have a backup of anything important. A disk may go
> up in smoke at any moment. In particular when doing things like
> installing Ubuntu it is always possible to click the wrong button and
> overwrite your windows partition. I forget exactly what the
> installation screen is like but *do not* say Install Side By Side with
> existing OS, instead you have to go to an advanced setup where you can
> explicitly say which partition you want to re-format and install
> Ubuntu on. If in any doubt then ask for further help when you have
> seen exactly what are the options.
>
> Ubuntu will install and run perfectly well in 10Gig by the way, though
> you will not have a huge amount of space for saving videos and so on.
> The OS itself is less than 5 I think. So if you just want to try it
> you could shrink one of your existing partitions.
>
> Colin

What I've done in similar instances was to first boot into the live cd and use
it's partition editor to wipe the partitions I was no longer going to use.
Then go back to the install phase and tell it to use the free space on the
drive. That's always worked for me

James

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Old 09-03-2010, 01:48 AM
James Takac
 
Default hi

Hi Parshwa

On Friday 03 September 2010 03:11:44 Parshwa Murdia wrote:
> On Thu, Sep 2, 2010 at 7:56 PM, Deryl R. Doucette <david@pgpkeys.net>
> wrote:
>
> Parsha, just remember that you can only have 4 *primary* partitions.
>
>
>
> Okay but my name is 'Parshwa'.
>
>
> This means that one primary partition will need to actually be an
>
> > extended partition inside which you make logical partitions. Ubuntu will
> > take care of the extended partition creation if you tell it that the
> > partition you want to make is a logical. I would suggest 2 or 3
> > *logical* partitions such as the following scheme:
> >
> > / on a logical
> > /home on a logical
> > swap on a logical
>
> Its really good to know but as I would be doing this first time (I am
> extremely new for understanding partitions), I would just replace the
> existing Linux system (Fedora Core 11) and I hope it would itself take care
> of it. Am I true?



That's basically the route I've taken in the past. What I'd suggest is to boot
the live cd and at first skip the install screen. An install icon will be
placed on the desktop. Once the desktop loads you can click through System ->
Administration -> Partion Editor from memory. The partion editor doesn't
appear to have installed by default after that on my system but can be added
in later if I need. You can then wipe the unwanted partions. Of course leave
the windows partion, the recovery partion assuming a recent pc and no windows
install disk, and any other partition you're not sure of. Generally you'll be
wiping the ext partions and the swap partion. Save that and exit the
partition manager. then double click the install icon on the desktop. Follow
the prompts and it should give you the option to use the largest available
free space. Take that option. It will look after the rest from there. On some
systems the install will appear to get stuck somewhere after the 90% mark. If
that happens (wait a while to make sure). You can safely reboot andlog in.
You'll likely have to click through Application -> Accessories -> Terminal
and enter the following command

sudo dpkg --configure -a

to correct a reported error from the update manager (assuming red minus sign
shows towards the top right of screen)

I'd also suggest to see what others may say re this. It's worked for me on 3
systems to date. 2 of which required that last step. It seems to depend on
the system being installed to

James


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Old 09-03-2010, 01:52 AM
James Takac
 
Default hi

Hi Parshwa

On Friday 03 September 2010 03:20:55 Parshwa Murdia wrote:
> On Thu, Sep 2, 2010 at 10:28 PM, Dave Woyciesjes
> <woyciesjes@sbcglobal.net>wrote:
>
> Colin - Judging by her (?) writing style in her posts, I'm guessing
>
> > English is not her native language, and she didn't really mean backing
> > up the BIOS/CMOS. Probably meant backing up the data on the hard drive...
> > It almost looks like she typing in native language and using a
> > program
> > to translate it to English..
>
> Colin is a lady? But it doesn't matter since here we are discussing
> technical aspects, and not the other ones.

I think they were assuming you were a lady. For most English only people a
name like yours can give confusion re gender. I'll admit to not knowing but
it's not so terribly important for now either

James


--
... Thus, the wise man deals with things through wu-wei and teaches through
no-words.
The ten thousand things flourish without interruption. They grow by
themselves, and no one possesses them.

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Old 09-03-2010, 02:00 AM
James Takac
 
Default hi

Hi Guys

On Friday 03 September 2010 06:49:16 Gurus Knugum wrote:
> Den 2010-09-02 19:14:27 skrev Parshwa Murdia <ubuntu.bkn@gmail.com>:
> > On Thu, Sep 2, 2010 at 9:25 PM, Gurus Knugum <gurus.knugum@gmail.com>
> > wrote:
> >
> > Another thing to do is to install Ubuntu to a USB memory. Then you can
> >
> >> start up your computer from it and you don't need to touch your HDD and
> >> you can play around with it for a while, even install things on it. When
> >> you really feel like you want it badly, then just install it on your
> >> Fedora partition, or wherever you like. I would replace the Windows
> >> partition, but you do as you like.
> >
> > Yes, but for me it would take time to replace Windows and swim in the
> > world
> > of open source, for it requires some time to know at least the basics to
> > handle the things smoothly. Further, as you suggest for USB, but I have
> > having only 2 GB (right now) of pen drive,so I must make it over a CD, a
> > live CD I mean.
>
> You can also make a Live USB stick. If it fits on a CD, it will sure fit
> on a 2 GB stick.
>
> --
> Kind regards
>
> Johnny Rosenberg


As an alternate idea one could use an actual external hard drive via usb which
gives much more room


James

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Old 09-03-2010, 07:13 AM
Parshwa Murdia
 
Default hi

On Fri, Sep 3, 2010 at 6:52 AM, James Takac <p3nndrag0n@gmail.com> wrote:


What I've done in similar instances was to first boot into the live cd and use

it's partition editor to wipe the partitions I was no longer going to use.

Then go back to the install phase and tell it to use the free space on the

drive. That's always worked for me


To wipe the partition is okay but as I am doing it first time, I am afraid a little if anything goes wrong. Though if it worked for you always, it would work then as it worked over the machine!

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