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Old 05-04-2011, 01:00 PM
 
Default Natty and the Real Time Kernel

Hi Giuliano,

On May 4, 2011 7:40am, Giuliano Braglia <forevergyl@gmail.com> wrote:
> I've been browsing through old threads but i haven't been able to understand...
>
> In natty (but also in maeverik, and I guess also in future upgrades) there is no rt kernel available.
>

There are PPA's available with real time kernels available and I would expect even for Natty. I believe Falktx's PPA is one of these and well maintained at that.

>
> Would they work even without it? In Lucid I tried to start without rtkernel and I had a lot of Xruns in Jack.
>
>

Absolutely you can start and run JACK well without a real time kernel.

I want to point out that a real time kernel is not a panacea, simply installing it will not make every system run perfectly. You still need to need to adjust your settings in JACK to accommodate your hardware. This might mean increasing your latency from 2.9msecs (for example) to 11.2msecs (for example) to find a stable latency without xruns.

Additionally, you did not specify how you installed your audio packages, i.e. if you did a fresh install from a Ubuntu Studio DVD or just added the packages to a vanilla Ubuntu install. If you did the later you will still need to add your user to the audio group and you should have installed JACK so that it could use real time privileges. Without these you would suffer performance degradation.

I should point out that using a -generic kernel does not preclude installing JACK with real time privileges. As noted above, I would advise that JACK have these privileges, even with the -generic kernel, or it will suffer poor performance and additional xruns.

I have found that the -generic kernel provides very acceptable stable latencies.

Regards,
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Old 05-04-2011, 02:32 PM
Giuliano Braglia
 
Default Natty and the Real Time Kernel

There are PPA's available with real time kernels available and I would expect even for Natty. I believe Falktx's PPA is one of these and well maintained at that.


I don't know what a PPA is *
>
> Would they work even without it? In Lucid I tried to start without rtkernel and I had a lot of Xruns in Jack.

>
>


Additionally, you did not specify how you installed your audio packages, i.e. if you did a fresh install from a Ubuntu Studio DVD or just added the packages to a vanilla Ubuntu install. If you did the later you will still need to add your user to the audio group and you should have installed JACK so that it could use real time privileges. Without these you would suffer performance degradation.



Actually I'm on a Ubuntu properly modified following a guide made by an italian guy, do you think that, in future, I should install a complete Ubuntu Studio?

*
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Old 05-04-2011, 10:06 PM
 
Default Natty and the Real Time Kernel

On May 4, 2011 9:32am, Giuliano Braglia <forevergyl@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> There are PPA's available with real time kernels available and I would expect even for Natty. I believe Falktx's PPA is one of these and well maintained at that.
>
>
>
>
> I don't know what a PPA is *
>

PPA is an acronym for Personal Package Archive. This lets people package and build applications in their own personal repositories. These are very similar to the official repositories (like Main, Restricted, Universe, Multiverse) in Ubuntu.

You can add PPA's to your sources.list file and install applications from there. It is suggested that you should use caution and only use trusted PPA's as not all will have functioning applications or will be maintained well.

Here is a link that you can read more about PPA's: https://help.launchpad.net/Packaging/PPA

> >
> > Would they work even without it? In Lucid I tried to start without rtkernel and I had a lot of Xruns in Jack.
>
> >
> >
>
>
>
> Additionally, you did not specify how you installed your audio packages, i.e. if you did a fresh install from a Ubuntu Studio DVD or just added the packages to a vanilla Ubuntu install. If you did the later you will still need to add your user to the audio group and you should have installed JACK so that it could use real time privileges. Without these you would suffer performance degradation.
>
>
>
>
> Actually I'm on a Ubuntu properly modified following a guide made by an italian guy, do you think that, in future, I should install a complete Ubuntu Studio?
>
>
>
> *
>
>
>

I have found that some people feel very passionate about this questions. I personally appreciate the complete Ubuntu Studio install as it reduces the amount that I have to tinker with my system. Others prefer to add their packages as required because it allows them to moderate their system to better serve their needs.

If you have a system that works for you then I would suggest staying with it. But you may try a full install once and see if it works better for you.

In some instances there are people that choose to start with a Ubuntu install first for technical reasons that might have been resolved in later Ubuntu Studio releases. I am specifically thinking about networking and wifi. In past Ubuntu Studio releases we shipped gnome-network-admin which had difficulty with setting wifi, therefore some might have started with a vanilla Ubuntu install before it shipped with network-manager which worked brilliantly for wiki. Ubuntu Studio has recently moved to using network-manager as well, so the reasoning for their installation process may not exists anymore.

Again, it's still a personal decision.

Regards,
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Old 05-05-2011, 07:17 AM
Bellegarde Laurent
 
Default Natty and the Real Time Kernel

Selon ScottALavender@gmail.com:

> On May 4, 2011 9:32am, Giuliano Braglia <forevergyl@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> > There are PPA's available with real time kernels available and I would
> > expect even for Natty. I believe Falktx's PPA is one of these and well
> > maintained at that.
>
>
>
>

Hi all,

I'm starting testing natty i386 on a netbook celeron 900 2Go Asus eeepc 900
which is running with lucid i386 RT kernel fine (RT kernel is Alessio's one).

For natty, which kernel should I test ? Alessio's one, or FaltX' one ?

My wish is to test if natty low latency or RT kernel is stable and as performant
as lucid one before talking about it at Ubuntu Party in Paris the 28-29 may
2011...

Thanks for answers.


Bellegarde Laurent
free video : lprod.org

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Old 05-05-2011, 08:46 AM
Victor henri
 
Default Natty and the Real Time Kernel

Hello


>
> Hi all,
>
> I'm starting testing natty i386 on a netbook celeron 900 2Go Asus eeepc 900
> which is running with lucid i386 RT kernel fine (RT kernel is Alessio's one).
>
> For natty, which kernel should I test ? Alessio's one, or FaltX' one ?

Hello both (rt from Falk's and low latency from Alessio's) are probably fine

My personal experience is, since 2.6.33, many improvements have been done in the low latency kernel; I, as several other people, have reported excellent performances of the 2.6.37 and 2.6.38 low latency kernel, that seemed to get much closer closer to the rt performance then before. That allows me, most of the time to not use anymore the RT kernel and all its related problems...

Victor


>
> My wish is to test if natty low latency or RT kernel is stable and as performant
> as lucid one before talking about it at Ubuntu Party in Paris the 28-29 may
> 2011...
>
> Thanks for answers.
>
>
> Bellegarde Laurent
> free video : lprod.org
>


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Old 05-07-2011, 05:30 AM
Brian David
 
Default Natty and the Real Time Kernel

On Thu, May 5, 2011 at 3:46 AM, Victor henri <nadaeck@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> My personal experience is, since 2.6.33, many improvements have been done in
> the low latency kernel; I, as several other people, have reported excellent
> performances of the 2.6.37 and 2.6.38 low latency kernel, that seemed to get
> much closer closer to the rt performance then before. That allows me, most
> of the time to not use anymore the RT kernel and all its related problems...
>

I just installed Natty for the first time tonight. This time around,
I went with Xubuntu and installed the Ubuntu Studio packages on top of
that. As Scott mentioned, I needed to add myself to the audio group,
but after this my equipment immediately worked. Unlike previous
versions, there was no need to change any configuration files to get
access to my firewire device, which means that Ubuntu Studio is
basically working out of the box for me now (or, it would be if I had
installed from an Ubuntu Studio disc). Yay!

For a test run, I did some mixing on a recording I'm working on right
now. I started out using the generic kernel, and performance was
surprisingly solid. There were a few x-runs when starting up or
switching between applications, but otherwise it was usable.

I then installed Allessio's low latency kernel, and proceeded to mix
for an hour and half without a single x-run, even when starting up
applications and switching between them. Rock on! So, I can say
definitively that the low latency kernel gives me better performance
over generic.

This test was run at 44.1 khz / 512 frames / 3 periods - getting about
34.9 msec latency. The next time I get the chance, I'll set up some
mics and do a recording test at lower latencies (I'll push it to 128
frames, which will take it down to 8.71 msec latency. This is
something I have been able to do previously using rt kernels) and see
how it performs.

So far so good. Thanks for the work, everyone!


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Old 05-07-2011, 06:05 AM
bart deruyter
 
Default Natty and the Real Time Kernel

Hi all,

I've got the same result as Brian David. The generic kernel works quite well, but has xruns, strangely enough, mostly when doing 'nothing'. So far I had no xruns because of recording, mixing, using rakarrack etc... The xruns seem to happen at random.



I do use Unity though, maybe there is something in there that asks some processes which cause the xruns.

My soundcard is an external one, Audiofire 12. jackd is setup at 48000, 256 frames/period and 3 periods/buffer, at a latency of 16 msec.



Running the low-latency kernel eliminates all xruns... I'll definatly keep using it, and I do recommend it too.

http://www.bartart3d.be/



2011/5/7 Brian David <beejunk@gmail.com>


On Thu, May 5, 2011 at 3:46 AM, Victor henri <nadaeck@hotmail.com> wrote:

>

> My personal experience is, since 2.6.33, many improvements have been done in

> the low latency kernel; I, as several other people, have reported excellent

> performances of the 2.6.37 and 2.6.38 low latency kernel, that seemed to get

> much closer closer to the rt performance then before. That allows me, most

> of the time to not use anymore the RT kernel and all its related problems...

>



I just installed Natty for the first time tonight. *This time around,

I went with Xubuntu and installed the Ubuntu Studio packages on top of

that. *As Scott mentioned, I needed to add myself to the audio group,

but after this my equipment immediately worked. *Unlike previous

versions, there was no need to change any configuration files to get

access to my firewire device, which means that Ubuntu Studio is

basically working out of the box for me now (or, it would be if I had

installed from an Ubuntu Studio disc). *Yay!



For a test run, I did some mixing on a recording I'm working on right

now. *I started out using the generic kernel, and performance was

surprisingly solid. *There were a few x-runs when starting up or

switching between applications, but otherwise it was usable.



I then installed Allessio's low latency kernel, and proceeded to mix

for an hour and half without a single x-run, even when starting up

applications and switching between them. *Rock on! *So, I can say

definitively that the low latency kernel gives me better performance

over generic.



This test was run at 44.1 khz / 512 frames / 3 periods - getting about

34.9 msec latency. *The next time I get the chance, I'll set up some

mics and do a recording test at lower latencies (I'll push it to 128

frames, which will take it down to 8.71 msec latency. *This is

something I have been able to do previously using rt kernels) and see

how it performs.



So far so good. *Thanks for the work, everyone!





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Old 05-24-2011, 07:29 PM
"laurent.bellegarde"
 
Default Natty and the Real Time Kernel

Hi all tonight here in France,



I've finished my tests on my netbook.



So with last low-latency kernel coming from Alessio PPA, i can run
jackd + hydrogen + ardour at 11,4ms, 256 frames /3 periods with an
small intel onboard sound card on my modest netbook asus eeepc
celeron 900 MHz, 2Go with natty and unity desktop without any xruns.
I'm using 17% of Jackd RT power.



on the generic kernel, i've got many xruns as soon as i'm moving a
window of any program...



Compare to lucid RT kernel running under the same computer, the
level of performance is quite the same and low-latency kernel could
be use for production.



An another info, the graphic controller is an old onboard intel
i810.



Complete demo and official conference about multimedia with
ubuntu/ubuntu studio in Paris next saturday in La Villette sciences
city if the island volcanoe let me fly to Paris ;-)



Some news coming soon.



Bye



Laurent



Le 07/05/2011 08:05, bart deruyter a écrit*:
Hi all,



I've got the same result as Brian David. The generic kernel works
quite well, but has xruns, strangely enough, mostly when doing
'nothing'. So far I had no xruns because of recording, mixing,
using rakarrack etc... The xruns seem to happen at random.



I do use Unity though, maybe there is something in there that asks
some processes which cause the xruns.



My soundcard is an external one, Audiofire 12. jackd is setup at
48000, 256 frames/period and 3 periods/buffer, at a latency of 16
msec.



Running the low-latency kernel eliminates all xruns... I'll
definatly keep using it, and I do recommend it too.




http://www.bartart3d.be/





2011/5/7 Brian David <beejunk@gmail.com>


On Thu, May 5, 2011 at 3:46 AM, Victor henri
<nadaeck@hotmail.com>
wrote:

>

> My personal experience is, since 2.6.33, many
improvements have been done in

> the low latency kernel; I, as several other people,
have reported excellent

> performances of the 2.6.37 and 2.6.38 low latency
kernel, that seemed to get

> much closer closer to the rt performance then before.
That allows me, most

> of the time to not use anymore the RT kernel and all
its related problems...

>




I just installed Natty for the first time tonight. *This time
around,

I went with Xubuntu and installed the Ubuntu Studio packages
on top of

that. *As Scott mentioned, I needed to add myself to the audio
group,

but after this my equipment immediately worked. *Unlike
previous

versions, there was no need to change any configuration files
to get

access to my firewire device, which means that Ubuntu Studio
is

basically working out of the box for me now (or, it would be
if I had

installed from an Ubuntu Studio disc). *Yay!



For a test run, I did some mixing on a recording I'm working
on right

now. *I started out using the generic kernel, and performance
was

surprisingly solid. *There were a few x-runs when starting up
or

switching between applications, but otherwise it was usable.



I then installed Allessio's low latency kernel, and proceeded
to mix

for an hour and half without a single x-run, even when
starting up

applications and switching between them. *Rock on! *So, I can
say

definitively that the low latency kernel gives me better
performance

over generic.



This test was run at 44.1 khz / 512 frames / 3 periods -
getting about

34.9 msec latency. *The next time I get the chance, I'll set
up some

mics and do a recording test at lower latencies (I'll push it
to 128

frames, which will take it down to 8.71 msec latency. *This is

something I have been able to do previously using rt kernels)
and see

how it performs.



So far so good. *Thanks for the work, everyone!





--

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