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Old 11-25-2007, 06:21 PM
Dennis Neumeier
 
Default Discussion from RoLo - my Point of view

Hello list,

I just read some of the points from RoLos Mail "so frustrating" and I simply
want to says some words about this.

First of all, I want you to know who am I. I am living in germany and I play
bass guitar for nearly 10 years, but although music is a central point in my
life, I never thought about going professional - so music is "just" a hobby
for me. Musically, I am into Hard Rock, Metal and Prog Rock.

Now, what concerns the mail from RoLo, I think we should all relax a little
bit and gain access to the issue from another point of view. I guess that
everyone making music comes to the point, where he/she wants to record it in
some way. Here arises the question: Where to go to record? Sure, in a pro
studio would be the first idea about it, but as far as I know, millionaires
among us are quite rare, so there are not many bands who can really afford a
pro studio.

Next idea: Home recording. Okay, this is realisable. But how? I do not want to
use commercial products such as Cubase and Pro Tools because of the amount of
money I waste. So Linux and Ardour is quite the next step. But to tell you
the truth: It's not easy for beginners to use this (and, btw, which soundcard
one should buy is another central question...) because of all the things you
have to know about jack...

So is there any alternative? Yes, I found myself one in the Boss BR-600
digital recorder. It's a 8-Track-recorder, smaller than a notebook and as
easy as a CD-Player. But is there any negative side of it (and that's what I
what you to think about)? Yes. Making music is a creative process and at some
point you're limited by the options the device you're using is giving you.
Although the BR-600 has even a (very good) mastering tool in it, you may face
the problem that at some point, you can't create the sound you want.

My own point of view can now be explained. If you don't want to learn all
about jack etc, you may use such a device as the BR 600 (320 Euros in
germany), so you spend a certain amount of money, but don't have spend time
learning stuff. But if you want to make sounds in the direction Mike Oldfield
or Jordan Rudess (on the keyboards of Dream Theater), such a device is not
enough so you have to learn deeper about home-recording technology.

Whichever of these both ways you may go - it's up to you!

Regards,
Dennis

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Old 11-25-2007, 07:25 PM
greg emond
 
Default Discussion from RoLo - my Point of view

I am pretty much in the same situation...playing for 15 years, home studio..ect ect.* and I agree with dennis. on almost everything

*

but where I differ is on the ease of use of commercial DAWs. ANY remotely decent recording tool* has a steep learning curve.* The first time you look at pro tools or cubase, you only see knobs and lines.* took me almost 2 years to be comfy with pro tools.** What is easyer though, is to switch from one DAW to an other. Understanding Ardour after being comfy on something else was much less a hassle.* There is just one* way to be 100% comfy with a DAW and that to use it, and use it* again, and use it even more.

*

Ardour is not harder to learn than pro tools, its just....differently laid.* And quite frankly, the Jack system is MUCH more flexible than anything on* windows.*

*

Again, I would compare recording to driving... it takes years to drive properly, but only months to go from automatic to standard transmission.

*

although, if something goes wrong under the hood, im clueless!* Thank god, ubuntu studio is nice and stable... caus Unix and me are 2 different beasts that will never communicate!

*

cheers! greg

> From: dennismail@gmx.net
> To: ubuntu-studio-users@lists.ubuntu.com
> Subject: Discussion from RoLo - my Point of view
> Date: Sun, 25 Nov 2007 20:21:00 +0100
>
> Hello list,
>
> I just read some of the points from RoLos Mail "so frustrating" and I simply
> want to says some words about this.
>
> First of all, I want you to know who am I. I am living in germany and I play
> bass guitar for nearly 10 years, but although music is a central point in my
> life, I never thought about going professional - so music is "just" a hobby
> for me. Musically, I am into Hard Rock, Metal and Prog Rock.
>
> Now, what concerns the mail from RoLo, I think we should all relax a little
> bit and gain access to the issue from another point of view. I guess that
> everyone making music comes to the point, where he/she wants to record it in
> some way. Here arises the question: Where to go to record? Sure, in a pro
> studio would be the first idea about it, but as far as I know, millionaires
> among us are quite rare, so there are not many bands who can really afford a
> pro studio.
>
> Next idea: Home recording. Okay, this is realisable. But how? I do not want to
> use commercial products such as Cubase and Pro Tools because of the amount of
> money I waste. So Linux and Ardour is quite the next step. But to tell you
> the truth: It's not easy for beginners to use this (and, btw, which soundcard
> one should buy is another central question...) because of all the things you
> have to know about jack...
>
> So is there any alternative? Yes, I found myself one in the Boss BR-600
> digital recorder. It's a 8-Track-recorder, smaller than a notebook and as
> easy as a CD-Player. But is there any negative side of it (and that's what I
> what you to think about)? Yes. Making music is a creative process and at some
> point you're limited by the options the device you're using is giving you.
> Although the BR-600 has even a (very good) mastering tool in it, you may face
> the problem that at some point, you can't create the sound you want.
>
> My own point of view can now be explained. If you don't want to learn all
> about jack etc, you may use such a device as the BR 600 (320 Euros in
> germany), so you spend a certain amount of money, but don't have spend time
> learning stuff. But if you want to make sounds in the direction Mike Oldfield
> or Jordan Rudess (on the keyboards of Dream Theater), such a device is not
> enough so you have to learn deeper about home-recording technology.
>
> Whichever of these both ways you may go - it's up to you!
>
> Regards,
> Dennis
>
> --
> Ubuntu-Studio-users mailing list
> Ubuntu-Studio-users@lists.ubuntu.com
> Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-studio-users


Envoie un sourire, fais rire, amuse-toi! Employez-le maintenant!
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