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Old 11-25-2007, 02:00 PM
RoLo
 
Default So Frustrating

Hello, been working with Ubuntu Studio, and have some question for you.

1. Can somebody explain in simple words how do you do your musical
process overflow on Ubuntu studio??
2. Can somebody explain me what is jack and how to use it. I use some
programs, cause I dream about a day where I can produce all my music
with Open Source, but to be honest It's been so hard because of the
documentation. I still join everything with cubase 'cause is faster for
me and don't really understand how to connect programs on Linux using
jack, so I export everything to wav and mix it up on Cubase, yeah I'm
not proud of it but I haven't been able to use JAMin, so....
3. Do you know any guide for Audio on Linux for newbies? For a standard
Windows/Mac user is FRUSTRATING not to found a nice guide on
ubuntustudio site. Don't wan't to be annoying but ¿How exactly do you
guys plan on making people adopt this new software/apps with out a GOOD
tutorials for newbies? And being said so, Is anybody out here interested
on doing that? I'll join to that initiative.
4. This mailing list is a really good method for helping users but I
think that maybe is time to wonder about a really nice, cool user
friendly way to teach new users this exciting distro.

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Old 11-25-2007, 03:30 PM
"Chris Dawson"
 
Default So Frustrating

Rolo,

I think you are dead on correct in your criticism of the current state
of UbuntuStudio and your thoughts point to issues with the Linux and
Open-Source communities at large.

However, this is an incredible opportunity to create a new type of
community because of this exact issue. One of the things that Ubuntu
(and Canonical the company that "owns" Ubuntu) has done that is unlike
any other Linux community in history is to expand the user community
outside of traditional Linux users. This is the first Linux community
in history where I would estimate the majority of new users are not
users coming from another Linux community but are coming from outside,
most likely Windows or even sometimes Macintosh OSX. This is a world
changing community.

This community is going to be different because of the sharing that
occurs. I would not say that, for example, the Windows development
community is good at "sharing." Windows developers hide their
solutions (so they can get paid for consulting) whereas Linux
developers offer their solutions to the world at large for free
(price) and freely (licensing).

This is the same opportunity we have with Ubuntu Studio. We as a
community have to find the ways to share information about this
project. I'm using it particularly as I learn piano, and so I use
JackD via QJack, Rosegarden, Qsynth. But, I've never shared how I use
it. I'll commit to doing this.

A friend of mine made a great little multimedia capture program called
"Screen-cast-o-matic." It is purely browser based, you just go to the
site and click a button to do screen captures with Java software in
the browser. Would anyone on this list be interested in documenting
their processes using something like this? I'll commit to using this
to document one or two of my processes; first step for me would be to
organize and figure out which two processes are interesting and
helpful. One problem I see with his software immediately is that SCOM
cannot capture using a java applet running inside of Firefox as the
sound card will be blocked by the Jackd process and Firefox cannot
connect to jackd. I've been trying to find a solution to this for a
long while. Perhaps there is another screen capture program, or would
people care if these were video only? I suppose it does not make a
lot of sense that audio creation demonstrations are without audio...

Any thoughts? Could we create a user generated site full of
UbuntuStudio audio application usage?

Chris

On Nov 25, 2007 1:00 PM, RoLo <rolodoom@gmail.com> wrote:
> Hello, been working with Ubuntu Studio, and have some question for you.
>
> 1. Can somebody explain in simple words how do you do your musical
> process overflow on Ubuntu studio??
> 2. Can somebody explain me what is jack and how to use it. I use some
> programs, cause I dream about a day where I can produce all my music
> with Open Source, but to be honest It's been so hard because of the
> documentation. I still join everything with cubase 'cause is faster for
> me and don't really understand how to connect programs on Linux using
> jack, so I export everything to wav and mix it up on Cubase, yeah I'm
> not proud of it but I haven't been able to use JAMin, so....
> 3. Do you know any guide for Audio on Linux for newbies? For a standard
> Windows/Mac user is FRUSTRATING not to found a nice guide on
> ubuntustudio site. Don't wan't to be annoying but ¿How exactly do you
> guys plan on making people adopt this new software/apps with out a GOOD
> tutorials for newbies? And being said so, Is anybody out here interested
> on doing that? I'll join to that initiative.
> 4. This mailing list is a really good method for helping users but I
> think that maybe is time to wonder about a really nice, cool user
> friendly way to teach new users this exciting distro.
>
> --
> Ubuntu-Studio-users mailing list
> Ubuntu-Studio-users@lists.ubuntu.com
> Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-studio-users
>

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Old 11-25-2007, 04:00 PM
"Cory K."
 
Default So Frustrating

RoLo wrote:
> Hello, been working with Ubuntu Studio, and have some question for you.
>
> 1. Can somebody explain in simple words how do you do your musical
> process overflow on Ubuntu studio??
> 2. Can somebody explain me what is jack and how to use it. I use some
> programs, cause I dream about a day where I can produce all my music
> with Open Source, but to be honest It's been so hard because of the
> documentation. I still join everything with cubase 'cause is faster for
> me and don't really understand how to connect programs on Linux using
> jack, so I export everything to wav and mix it up on Cubase, yeah I'm
> not proud of it but I haven't been able to use JAMin, so....
>

I'll leave this for others.

> 3. Do you know any guide for Audio on Linux for newbies? For a standard
> Windows/Mac user is FRUSTRATING not to found a nice guide on
> ubuntustudio site. Don't wan't to be annoying but ¿How exactly do you
> guys plan on making people adopt this new software/apps with out a GOOD
> tutorials for newbies?And being said so, Is anybody out here interested
> on doing that? I'll join to that initiative.
>

We do and have had a place for just this.
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UbuntuStudio That is the place to
generate info/help/guides specific to Ubuntu Studio.

Murat Günes, has recently been appointed our documentation lead. Over
the coming months he hopes to address some of the issues here. Realize
that this is a community and it takes YOU (directed at everyone reading)
also to improve this.

> 4. This mailing list is a really good method for helping users but I
> think that maybe is time to wonder about a really nice, cool user
> friendly way to teach new users this exciting distro.
>

This mailing list and wiki will remain the "official" places for
documentation though it would be nice to output to a printable format.


Everyone has to also remember that windows nor Mac (since the comparison
was made) does this. Documentation is generated by upstream. So I'm
against doing *major* documentation for a app within Ubuntu Studio. If
one starts to write documentation than realizes that most of the writing
is about the app specifically than I would encourage that person to look
at getting the info to upstream.

One thing we can do and should/can be a fairly easy task is have a wiki
page with links to upstream documentation.

-Cory m/

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Old 11-25-2007, 04:03 PM
"Cory K."
 
Default So Frustrating

Chris Dawson wrote:
> Rolo,
>
> I think you are dead on correct in your criticism of the current state
> of UbuntuStudio and your thoughts point to issues with the Linux and
> Open-Source communities at large.
>

The latter part of this is actually the more correct point.

> However, this is an incredible opportunity to create a new type of
> community because of this exact issue. One of the things that Ubuntu
> (and Canonical the company that "owns" Ubuntu) has done that is unlike
> any other Linux community in history is to expand the user community
> outside of traditional Linux users. This is the first Linux community
> in history where I would estimate the majority of new users are not
> users coming from another Linux community but are coming from outside,
> most likely Windows or even sometimes Macintosh OSX. This is a world
> changing community.
>
> This community is going to be different because of the sharing that
> occurs. I would not say that, for example, the Windows development
> community is good at "sharing." Windows developers hide their
> solutions (so they can get paid for consulting) whereas Linux
> developers offer their solutions to the world at large for free
> (price) and freely (licensing).
>
> This is the same opportunity we have with Ubuntu Studio. We as a
> community have to find the ways to share information about this
> project. I'm using it particularly as I learn piano, and so I use
> JackD via QJack, Rosegarden, Qsynth. But, I've never shared how I use
> it. I'll commit to doing this.
>
> A friend of mine made a great little multimedia capture program called
> "Screen-cast-o-matic." It is purely browser based, you just go to the
> site and click a button to do screen captures with Java software in
> the browser. Would anyone on this list be interested in documenting
> their processes using something like this? I'll commit to using this
> to document one or two of my processes; first step for me would be to
> organize and figure out which two processes are interesting and
> helpful. One problem I see with his software immediately is that SCOM
> cannot capture using a java applet running inside of Firefox as the
> sound card will be blocked by the Jackd process and Firefox cannot
> connect to jackd. I've been trying to find a solution to this for a
> long while. Perhaps there is another screen capture program, or would
> people care if these were video only? I suppose it does not make a
> lot of sense that audio creation demonstrations are without audio...
>
> Any thoughts? Could we create a user generated site full of
> UbuntuStudio audio application usage?
>

We have a place. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UbuntuStudio

-Cory m/

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Old 11-25-2007, 04:18 PM
"D. Michael McIntyre"
 
Default So Frustrating

On Sunday 25 November 2007, RoLo wrote:
> 1. Can somebody explain in simple words how do you do your musical
> process overflow on Ubuntu studio??

I can think of two representative examples from recent memory. One involved
notation, while the other did not.

First, Zynfidel started life when I was playing with ZynAddSubFX one day. I
had started ZynAddSubFX, and routed its JACK audio outputs to alsa_pcm in
order to hear it, using the Connect button and Audio tab in QJackCtl. I had
my keyboard's MIDI output routed to ZynAddSubFX by way of the Connect button
and MIDI tab also in QJackCtl, which an indispensable application for
managing JACK audio and ALSA MIDI connections, as well as starting the JACK
server itself, and monitoring its status.

I found one particular patch that sounded really cool when I played one note,
let it ring a bit, and then played another one. It was a seed of
inspiration.

So I fired up Rosegarden, routed Rosegarden's first MIDI output device to
ZynAddSubFX via its Manage MIDI Devices button, and recorded this little two
note motif. I looped it.

Then I went back to ZynAddSubFX, configured it to receive input on more than
one MIDI channel, found a drum patch that also sounded cool, set that up to
play on channel 2, and went back to Rosegarden to do something with the
drums, which I also looped.

I wound up using five different patches in ZynAddSubFX, along with a live
recording of me playing two arpeggiated chords on acoustic guitar. This all
formed the endlessly repeating and unchanging backbone of a long and
rambling "ambiance" piece. It went on for something like 8-9 minutes before
I finally came in with a long off the cuff acoustic guitar solo noodling
around on top of the tapestry of other sounds, including some
random "whacking on something" noises I also produced with ZynAddSubFX. The
whole thing wound up being all Zyn and live guitar, with nothing else
included, which I thought was rather cool of Zyn to be functional enough to
be pushed to what I thought was an impressive limit.

Then I probably used Time Machine to record a mixdown of all the tracks into
one file, probably by routing alsa_pcm directly to Time Machine. These days
I've taken to recording the mix directly inside Rosegarden, so I don't have
to load a gigantic file into an editor to cut off the first two minutes.

As I said, that example didn't include any notation. For another recent
project, I went back to a MIDI file I composed with Cakewalk in 1996 or so as
a pure MIDI piece, imported it into Rosegarden, and then I worked on a "live
instrument remix" version from there.

I ditched the lame MIDI acoustic guitar, and replaced it with a live
recording. To do this, I turned my external speakers off, and listened to my
Sound Canvas on headphones, so I wouldn't record the MIDI parts along with my
acoustic guitar. (This didn't completely work, and I can still hear the
synth instruments in the guitar recording a little, but it's close enough for
my low standards anyway.)

After I had replaced the worst part, I decided to use Hydrogen's superior drum
sounds to replace the lame drum kit on my aging Sound Canvas. I started
Hydrogen, found an appropriate kit, then went to the drum track in
Rosegarden, and assigned it to a MIDI playback instrument that was part of
the device connected to Hydrogen. Then I had to use various Rosegarden
features to remap the part to find the correct drums in Hydrogen, which has
different and all non-standard mappings for each one of its kits. After all
of that was said and done, I went ahead and recorded the drum track into an
audio segment.

Once I had that going, I replaced the MIDI pipe organ part with Aeolus, and
recorded that into an audio segment too.

Then I moved into the melody lines. One of them was written for "pan flute"
and the other for "trombone." I took each of these parts to convert for live
brass. I started with the "pan flute" part, transposed its playback -2 and
opened the segment in a notation view. I double clicked the key signature
and re-inserted the same key, directing Rosegarden to transpose relative to
the segment level transpose, which moved the notation +2 automatically, and
wrote the right key for me. Then I cleaned up the notation a little,
smoothed out some weird rests, moved pitches around to avoid anything too
high or too low for my own trumpet chops on a real instrument, and printed it
via LilyPond. I repeated the process for the "trombone" segment, moving it
around to fit my "Alto horn in Eb," and printing that as well.

As it happened, my alto horn chops are not good enough, and I was under a time
crunch to get this track onto a CD for an old friend, so I wound up using a
lame fake MIDI instrument on that part, but it does include a live trumpet.

Then I had considerable trouble mixing this one down. I was recording several
live tracks from my Sound Canvas mixed with several canned audio tracks. I
had to fiddle with the MIDI and the Audio mixers in Rosegarden, and my real
external mixer endlessly to get the right levels, and still wound up not
quite happy with the mix. I should do another mixdown one day, of a future
version that includes a live horn part, but this will suffice for today.

This last example really shows why I like Rosegarden so much for my own way of
working, because I can do everything in one place for compositions like
these. It is less satisfactory for trying to arrange big pieces of music for
a wide array of real instruments, but I will probably never do that. I
usually only need to make a small number of the parts playable on real
instruments for people who read music (flutes and brass, in other words,
because I don't read music for guitar anyway, and play all my guitar parts
(as well as most of my flute parts, actually) out of my head.) The rest can
be ugly in the notation view, and it still sounds fine.

I'm going to avoid getting into the rest of your questions, and hope somebody
else has something to say.
--
D. Michael McIntyre

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Old 11-25-2007, 04:54 PM
greg emond
 
Default So Frustrating

im pretty new to ubuntu studio, but I gotta say, the tools it offers are of pretty good quality once you get past the learning curve.* Took me about a month* of trial-error before recording, editind and mastering my first song.* What convinced me*to keep on going*was**was Jamin.** The only other "affordable" mastering tool that beats what jamin*offers is the Waves suite, and its still worth thousands.

Ardour is pretty complex, but if youre familiar with pro tools, you wont take too long to get it..Ive fiddled with it for 2 months or so now, and*once you get how*everything communicates together, you will*be impressed.
*
*Take jack as a virtual patch bay that makes every music app comunicate together.. like "real" cables.* just take it as virtual patch cables. Say you want to want to link your drum machine to your mixer, your mixer to your recorder, and your recorder back in your mixer for monitoring....in the*real world, you would have a spaghetti behind your desk right?*jack is exactly that, but virtually.* So heres a few tips.. I hope it helps.
*
keep in mind im like most car drivers out there... i know how to drive, but if something*goes wrong mechanically, I am at a loss.
*
*Make sure Jack is seeing your sound card, and that its buffer settings are set to accomodate your sound card.
there is* a nice setup tutorial at http://www.ubustu.com/globe/2007/05/29/how-to-configure-jack-in-ubuntu-studio/
(the fact that the tutorial uses my sound card as an example helps a lot though *
*
*Keep in mind* that ubuntu is much lighter than windows, so dont be shy* to use pretty high frames/period settings(buffers).**Even past 1500 the latency is still not a hindrance, and I*have very little xruns.***This high buffer allows me to record at 24 bit 96 khz without major issues.** remember, always let jack run in the background and keep an eye on xruns
*
*just select your inputs and outputs from your respective programs and jack does the rest.
*
ill give you a quck example of how I use ardour and jamin... hope it helps.
*
say I have a 16 track mix in ardour that sounds kool enough to be worth mastering.* First of all, I create a 17th stereo track that I mute as soon as I create it and arm it for recording.
*
then i start jamin
*
* then, in*ardours mixer window I right click in the master out. *(the black box at the bottom of every track.)* click edit* and remove your main ALSA outs* (your sound cards output) to avoid loop feedback.*
*
then I switch *to jamin, and in the input menu, I select the master outs from ardour. Then I select jamins output menu*and select the main ALSA outs.* You should have sound from jamin now if you press play in ardour.* there is a nice tutorial on jamins tools at http://jamin.sourceforge.net/en/uibasics.html* check the whole site, its worth it!
*
once youre happy with he mastering, select the 17th track (the one thats muted) as an output in jamin. Giving it a name when you created it wil make it easyer to spot. just play and record ath the same time, and that 17th track will be your master...just right click it and export it in the format you want.
*
hope this helps a bit, and feel free to ask the commuity if stomped.
*
*
> Date: Sun, 25 Nov 2007 10:00:44 -0500
> From: rolodoom@gmail.com
> To: ubuntu-studio-users@lists.ubuntu.com
> Subject: So Frustrating
>
> Hello, been working with Ubuntu Studio, and have some question for you.
>
> 1. Can somebody explain in simple words how do you do your musical
> process overflow on Ubuntu studio??
> 2. Can somebody explain me what is jack and how to use it. I use some
> programs, cause I dream about a day where I can produce all my music
> with Open Source, but to be honest It's been so hard because of the
> documentation. I still join everything with cubase 'cause is faster for
> me and don't really understand how to connect programs on Linux using
> jack, so I export everything to wav and mix it up on Cubase, yeah I'm
> not proud of it but I haven't been able to use JAMin, so....
> 3. Do you know any guide for Audio on Linux for newbies? For a standard
> Windows/Mac user is FRUSTRATING not to found a nice guide on
> ubuntustudio site. Don't wan't to be annoying but ¿How exactly do you
> guys plan on making people adopt this new software/apps with out a GOOD
> tutorials for newbies? And being said so, Is anybody out here interested
> on doing that? I'll join to that initiative.
> 4. This mailing list is a really good method for helping users but I
> think that maybe is time to wonder about a really nice, cool user
> friendly way to teach new users this exciting distro.
>
> --
> Ubuntu-Studio-users mailing list
> Ubuntu-Studio-users@lists.ubuntu.com
> Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-studio-users
> From: michael.mcintyre@rosegardenmusic.com
> To: ubuntu-studio-users@lists.ubuntu.com
> Subject: Re: So Frustrating
> Date: Sun, 25 Nov 2007 12:18:21 -0500
>
> On Sunday 25 November 2007, RoLo wrote:
> > 1. Can somebody explain in simple words how do you do your musical
> > process overflow on Ubuntu studio??
>
> I can think of two representative examples from recent memory. One involved
> notation, while the other did not.
>
> First, Zynfidel started life when I was playing with ZynAddSubFX one day. I
> had started ZynAddSubFX, and routed its JACK audio outputs to alsa_pcm in
> order to hear it, using the Connect button and Audio tab in QJackCtl. I had
> my keyboard's MIDI output routed to ZynAddSubFX by way of the Connect button
> and MIDI tab also in QJackCtl, which an indispensable application for
> managing JACK audio and ALSA MIDI connections, as well as starting the JACK
> server itself, and monitoring its status.
>
> I found one particular patch that sounded really cool when I played one note,
> let it ring a bit, and then played another one. It was a seed of
> inspiration.
>
> So I fired up Rosegarden, routed Rosegarden's first MIDI output device to
> ZynAddSubFX via its Manage MIDI Devices button, and recorded this little two
> note motif. I looped it.
>
> Then I went back to ZynAddSubFX, configured it to receive input on more than
> one MIDI channel, found a drum patch that also sounded cool, set that up to
> play on channel 2, and went back to Rosegarden to do something with the
> drums, which I also looped.
>
> I wound up using five different patches in ZynAddSubFX, along with a live
> recording of me playing two arpeggiated chords on acoustic guitar. This all
> formed the endlessly repeating and unchanging backbone of a long and
> rambling "ambiance" piece. It went on for something like 8-9 minutes before
> I finally came in with a long off the cuff acoustic guitar solo noodling
> around on top of the tapestry of other sounds, including some
> random "whacking on something" noises I also produced with ZynAddSubFX. The
> whole thing wound up being all Zyn and live guitar, with nothing else
> included, which I thought was rather cool of Zyn to be functional enough to
> be pushed to what I thought was an impressive limit.
>
> Then I probably used Time Machine to record a mixdown of all the tracks into
> one file, probably by routing alsa_pcm directly to Time Machine. These days
> I've taken to recording the mix directly inside Rosegarden, so I don't have
> to load a gigantic file into an editor to cut off the first two minutes.
>
> As I said, that example didn't include any notation. For another recent
> project, I went back to a MIDI file I composed with Cakewalk in 1996 or so as
> a pure MIDI piece, imported it into Rosegarden, and then I worked on a "live
> instrument remix" version from there.
>
> I ditched the lame MIDI acoustic guitar, and replaced it with a live
> recording. To do this, I turned my external speakers off, and listened to my
> Sound Canvas on headphones, so I wouldn't record the MIDI parts along with my
> acoustic guitar. (This didn't completely work, and I can still hear the
> synth instruments in the guitar recording a little, but it's close enough for
> my low standards anyway.)
>
> After I had replaced the worst part, I decided to use Hydrogen's superior drum
> sounds to replace the lame drum kit on my aging Sound Canvas. I started
> Hydrogen, found an appropriate kit, then went to the drum track in
> Rosegarden, and assigned it to a MIDI playback instrument that was part of
> the device connected to Hydrogen. Then I had to use various Rosegarden
> features to remap the part to find the correct drums in Hydrogen, which has
> different and all non-standard mappings for each one of its kits. After all
> of that was said and done, I went ahead and recorded the drum track into an
> audio segment.
>
> Once I had that going, I replaced the MIDI pipe organ part with Aeolus, and
> recorded that into an audio segment too.
>
> Then I moved into the melody lines. One of them was written for "pan flute"
> and the other for "trombone." I took each of these parts to convert for live
> brass. I started with the "pan flute" part, transposed its playback -2 and
> opened the segment in a notation view. I double clicked the key signature
> and re-inserted the same key, directing Rosegarden to transpose relative to
> the segment level transpose, which moved the notation +2 automatically, and
> wrote the right key for me. Then I cleaned up the notation a little,
> smoothed out some weird rests, moved pitches around to avoid anything too
> high or too low for my own trumpet chops on a real instrument, and printed it
> via LilyPond. I repeated the process for the "trombone" segment, moving it
> around to fit my "Alto horn in Eb," and printing that as well.
>
> As it happened, my alto horn chops are not good enough, and I was under a time
> crunch to get this track onto a CD for an old friend, so I wound up using a
> lame fake MIDI instrument on that part, but it does include a live trumpet.
>
> Then I had considerable trouble mixing this one down. I was recording several
> live tracks from my Sound Canvas mixed with several canned audio tracks. I
> had to fiddle with the MIDI and the Audio mixers in Rosegarden, and my real
> external mixer endlessly to get the right levels, and still wound up not
> quite happy with the mix. I should do another mixdown one day, of a future
> version that includes a live horn part, but this will suffice for today.
>
> This last example really shows why I like Rosegarden so much for my own way of
> working, because I can do everything in one place for compositions like
> these. It is less satisfactory for trying to arrange big pieces of music for
> a wide array of real instruments, but I will probably never do that. I
> usually only need to make a small number of the parts playable on real
> instruments for people who read music (flutes and brass, in other words,
> because I don't read music for guitar anyway, and play all my guitar parts
> (as well as most of my flute parts, actually) out of my head.) The rest can
> be ugly in the notation view, and it still sounds fine.
>
> I'm going to avoid getting into the rest of your questions, and hope somebody
> else has something to say.
> --
> D. Michael McIntyre
>
> --
> Ubuntu-Studio-users mailing list
> Ubuntu-Studio-users@lists.ubuntu.com
> Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-studio-users

Envoie un sourire, fais rire, amuse-toi! Employez-le maintenant!
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Old 11-26-2007, 06:19 AM
Asmo Koskinen
 
Default So Frustrating

RoLo kirjoitti:
> 2. Can somebody explain me what is jack and how to use it.

Maybe this helps, I just found it.

"JACK Sync: A Primer For Linux Users"

http://www.linuxjournal.com/node/1004080

Dave Philips's articles are always good to read and learn.

http://www.linuxjournal.com/user/800764/track

Best Regards Asmo Koskinen.

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Old 11-26-2007, 09:27 AM
Ismael Valladolid Torres
 
Default So Frustrating

RoLo escribe:
> I still join everything with cubase 'cause is faster for
> me and don't really understand how to connect programs on Linux using
> jack

Then you certainly were born knowing how to use Cubase, lucky you...

Cordially, Ismael
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Old 11-26-2007, 11:25 AM
Greg K.
 
Default So Frustrating

...And born with a Cubase licence too

*

Anyway, if you're as noob as me on linux-audio/jack/ardour/blahblah, try connecting your apps with Patchage which is way more easy to use.

And if you still don't see how it works, ask someone to show you once, then you'll understand.

*

Cheers

*

*

> Message: 2
> Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2007 11:27:30 +0100
> From: Ismael Valladolid Torres <ivalladt@ono.com>
> Subject: Re: So Frustrating
> To: rolodoom@gmail.com, Ubuntu Studio Users Help and Discussion
> <ubuntu-studio-users@lists.ubuntu.com>
> Message-ID: <20071126102730.GA3344@ono.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
>
> RoLo escribe:
> > I still join everything with cubase 'cause is faster for
> > me and don't really understand how to connect programs on Linux using
> > jack
>
> Then you certainly were born knowing how to use Cubase, lucky you...
>
> Cordially, Ismael
> --
> Ismael Valladolid Torres GnuPG key: DE721AF4
> Jabber: ivalladt@gmail.com
> http://usuarios.lycos.es/ivalladt/ Skype: ivalladt
>

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