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Old 01-31-2008, 07:23 PM
"Christopher Stamper"
 
Default A bad experience ...

Well, I just redid them. They were pretty simple at that time, so it wasn't worth fixing.

Just irritating bugs with dynamics, velocity, etc.

On Jan 30, 2008 11:26 PM, Haig Dedeyan <hdedeyan@videotron.ca> wrote:

On January 30, 2008 08:36:36 pm Haig Dedeyan wrote:

> I agree that if you want something to work guaranteed, fork over a gob of

> cash, and buy the real stuff. *Even if the real stuff doesn't actually
> work, at least you'll be someone else's support problem. *I don't mean that
> in a personal way directed at you, Christopher, just in general at any user

> who really needs something to work guaranteed.
> D. Michael McIntyre

Even the real stuff, be it hardware or software, has issues regardless of how
much it costs.

Speaking from experience, the only equipment that are somewhat bug free are

turnkey systems and even at that, if you deviate from the original
configuration in any way, the support team will tell you sucks to be you,
reload the initial configuration from a restore cd and then call us if you

have problems, not to mention the few hundred bugs that are still open when
the system is released.

Haig

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Old 02-04-2008, 09:50 PM
Gustin Johnson
 
Default A bad experience ...

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

Det wrote:
| @Larry Lines and @Andrew Hunter
|
| Larry Lines wrote:
|> My first question would be... Why Rosegarden? I would never think
|> to use Rosegarden for live recording. I keep seeing people do
|> this, but certainly Ardour would be my first choice. A lot less
|> overhead. Maybe I am wrong.
|
| 1.) I stumbled over Rosegarden somewhere in the past and it then was
| the pendant to Cubase, which I knew from my vintage Atari. So it was
| a natural first step to start that up.

Rosegarden works for me. I have a 16 channel rig (RME 9652 + external
interfaces).

| 2.) Why *not* Rosegarden? It seems meant for that, I immediately
| found good documentation answering my questions ...?!

I prefer Ardour for these tasks. Having come from the Cubase world a
few years ago, Ardour best suits my work flow.

I do use Rosegarden for midi editing and composition. But the audio
almost always gets routed to Ardour.

I have both apps open at the same time, doing separate tasks.

There is a learning curve, but once you wrap your head around the
basics, the payoff will be immense.

As an aside, I have been using Ardour for many years, and I still learn
something new on a regular basis. This is true for Linux Audio in general.

| 3.) As I said, I *did* recording with Rosegarden. And recording some
| synthe waves and doing multitrack voice recording isn't less "live"
| as a electric guitar, from the tool's viewpoint, is it?

I would look at hard drive performance. The I/O on laptops is usually
significantly slower on laptops. You may also need to tune your hard
drive with hdparm, google is your friend here.

| Nevertheless, I heard of, but do not know Ardour. Seems this has to
| change pronto. I'll see how the machine reacts to this. (Beside that
| I wonder if Michael would like to say something...)

<snip>

| I already saw that argument too. But neither did I claim I'd have a
| valid test scenario for comparision, nor did I imagine my machine as
| "inadequate" (reg. the datasheet), as Jack and Rosegarden wired 2 in
| 2 out should do the job at least as well as Jack, Rosegarden,
| ZynAddthing, QSynth, all wired together midiwise and audiowise (not
| to mention my sons pc being standard, not "dedicated"). That seems to
| have been an illusion.

Linux is not Windows. It is not a valid comparison. Your son does not
have a jack equivalent (and yes I have used rewire extensively, it is
still not in the same ball park). You would likely have had the same
results as your son if you had not used the apps you did. Audacity
works fine for me on all my Linux boxes. It is sort of like pulling out
a sword that you don't know how to use, then whining when you cut
yourself.

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Old 02-05-2008, 01:05 PM
Sean Edwards
 
Default A bad experience ...

Ecasound, Audacity, arecord, aplay and sox are pretty much all I need for recording.* I mostly use ecasound for recording, and Audacity for clean up and mastering.

-=cybersean=-

----- Original Message ----
From: Gustin Johnson <gustin@echostar.ca>
To: Ubuntu Studio Users Help and Discussion <ubuntu-studio-users@lists.ubuntu.com>
Sent: Monday, February 4, 2008 4:50:35 PM
Subject: Re: A bad experience ...


-----BEGIN
PGP
SIGNED
MESSAGE-----
Hash:
SHA1

Det
wrote:
|
@Larry
Lines
and
@Andrew
Hunter
|
|
Larry
Lines
wrote:
|>
My
first
question
would
be...
Why
Rosegarden?*
I
would
never
think
|>
to
use
Rosegarden
for
live
recording.*
I
keep
seeing
people
do
|>
this,
but
certainly
Ardour
would
be
my
first
choice.*
A
lot
less
|>
overhead.
Maybe
I
am
wrong.
|
|
1.)
I
stumbled
over
Rosegarden
somewhere
in
the
past
and
it
then
was
|
the
pendant
to
Cubase,
which
I
knew
from
my
vintage
Atari.
So
it
was
|
a
natural
first
step
to
start
that
up.

Rosegarden
works
for
me.*
I
have
a
16
channel
rig
(RME
9652
+
external
interfaces).

|
2.)
Why
*not*
Rosegarden?*
It
seems
meant
for
that,
I
immediately
|
found
good
documentation
answering
my
questions
...?!

I
prefer
Ardour
for
these
tasks.*
Having
come
from
the
Cubase
world
a
few
years
ago,
Ardour
best
suits
my
work
flow.

I
do
use
Rosegarden
for
midi
editing
and
composition.*
But
the
audio
almost
always
gets
routed
to
Ardour.

I
have
both
apps
open
at
the
same
time,
doing
separate
tasks.

There
is
a
learning
curve,
but
once
you
wrap
your
head
around
the
basics,
the
payoff
will
be
immense.

As
an
aside,
I
have
been
using
Ardour
for
many
years,
and
I
still
learn
something
new
on
a
regular
basis.*
This
is
true
for
Linux
Audio
in
general.

|
3.)
As
I
said,
I
*did*
recording
with
Rosegarden.
And
recording
some
|
synthe
waves
and
doing
multitrack
voice
recording
isn't
less
"live"
|
as
a
electric
guitar,
from
the
tool's
viewpoint,
is
it?

I
would
look
at
hard
drive
performance.*
The
I/O
on
laptops
is
usually
significantly
slower
on
laptops.*
You
may
also
need
to
tune
your
hard
drive
with
hdparm,
google
is
your
friend
here.

|
Nevertheless,
I
heard
of,
but
do
not
know
Ardour.
Seems
this
has
to
|
change
pronto.
I'll
see
how
the
machine
reacts
to
this.
(Beside
that
|
I
wonder
if
Michael
would
like
to
say
something...)

<snip>

|
I
already
saw
that
argument
too.
But
neither
did
I
claim
I'd
have
a
|
valid
test
scenario
for
comparision,
nor
did
I
imagine
my
machine
as
|
"inadequate"
(reg.
the
datasheet),
as
Jack
and
Rosegarden
wired
2
in
|
2
out
should
do
the
job
at
least
as
well
as
Jack,
Rosegarden,
|
ZynAddthing,
QSynth,
all
wired
together
midiwise
and
audiowise
(not
|
to
mention
my
sons
pc
being
standard,
not
"dedicated").
That
seems
to
|
have
been
an
illusion.

Linux
is
not
Windows.*
It
is
not
a
valid
comparison.*
Your
son
does
not
have
a
jack
equivalent
(and
yes
I
have
used
rewire
extensively,
it
is
still
not
in
the
same
ball
park).*
You
would
likely
have
had
the
same
results
as
your
son
if
you
had
not
used
the
apps
you
did.*
Audacity
works
fine
for
me
on
all
my
Linux
boxes.*
It
is
sort
of
like
pulling
out
a
sword
that
you
don't
know
how
to
use,
then
whining
when
you
cut
yourself.

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PGP
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Version:
GnuPG
v1.4.5
(MingW32)
Comment:
Using
GnuPG
with
Mozilla
-
http://enigmail.mozdev.org

iD8DBQFHp5a7wRXgH3rKGfMRArluAJ9dtLXlen6eJlL4P4/gFbqzFZOGLwCghayj
t/DoDTjz2K3Qcp6zBNzXXvc=
=KjD+
-----END
PGP
SIGNATURE-----

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Old 02-05-2008, 02:30 PM
"Det"
 
Default A bad experience ...

Hi Gustin,

thanks for your mail.

> I would look at hard drive performance. The I/O on laptops is usually
> significantly slower on laptops. You may also need to tune your hard
> drive with hdparm, google is your friend here.

Thanks for the tip.
Reg. dedicated hardware, it will come to S-ATA, I suppose?

> Linux is not Windows.

Fortunately not.
I am somewhat sceptic when it comes to windows.

> It is not a valid comparison.

That's right, as I already said.

> Your son does not have a jack equivalent (and yes I have used
> rewire extensively, it is still not in the same ball park).
> You would likely have had the same results as your son if you had
> not used the apps you did.

This may indeed be right, but nevertheless a sad result, isn't it?

It all comes to the same result in the end:
Musicians want to make music, not administering their OS in the first place.

UbuntuStudio wants to be a distribution for exactly that people, a
specific kind
of all the people who simply wants to work with their computers, what is the
target of Ubuntu in general.

To be of really great usability, a system needs to be reliable,
understandable,
maintainable. That's why so many people are attracted by Macs.
Buying and running a Mac is like buying and running a DVD recorder or the
like.

For UbuntuStudio to be of a comparable usability for new people giving it
a try,
it needs better documentation and clear hardware requirements.

A step by step instruction beginning with hints for purchasing adequate
hardware
(a list with some examples reg. some common use cases will do), installing
instructions, getting started with jack a.s.o. and then extracts from and
links to
the dedicated manuals for the different apps would be a bestseller in the
bookstores,
I suppose.

Its only a matter of time, I think ;-).

Many of the stuff is catchable in the wilderness of the internet already,
but not
in a structured, consolidated way.

Hardware advices, the first step, seems to be the last one to
be documented.

I for my part am software developer for business apps. I'm not shy to do
google researches and turn the screws of my system to get it work.
But after years of doing that with Unix, Suse, Debian, Knoppix and now
Ubuntu (without being the typical admin), I get weary.
Now it is okay to invest some few nights into such stuff, but it must be
balanced
with the experience of actively using it.


> Audacity works fine for me on all my Linux boxes. It is sort of like
pulling out
> a sword that you don't know how to use, then whining when you cut
> yourself.

Experience from teachers:
If you teach your childs to do manufacturing, give them sharp tools.
The danger to get hurt is much bigger with the edgeless ones.

I thought the named combi to be a tool sharp enough for the job.
BTW: It is an interesting consideration that we already DID that jobs with
apps like Cubase on machines that were far away from the performance
data of actual systems. But that was deep down in history ...

Regarding what I said above: Yes, unfortunately the machine may
be fit for the cutter, not for the swiss army knife.
Yes, I'm not interested in doing too much research in performance
optimisation
of the said laptop.
Buying dedicated hardware is an option.
So the question is: Which?

KR
Dirk




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